Sign in to follow this  
Dr. Crossbar

How Do We Manage Hughes's Ice Time So He Doesn't Burn Out?

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

9 minutes ago, Dr. Crossbar said:

It's been incredible to see the impact Quinn Hughes has had on our blueline. We're seeing something special now on a nightly basis and it's really just beginning.

Looking at the last five games, though, Hughes is logging 20 minutes per game, the same as Myers and Tanev with Edler still logging the most D minutes at approx 23 minutes.

As we continue to do well, with goals coming and everyone contributing, we're playing at what appears to be break neck pace through 11 games. And if we're going to make the playoffs, we can't afford to let games slip away. We have to keep it up night in and night out.

Last season we saw Pettersson burn out after January and struggle with the lengthy season. He even admitted in the offseason that he had trouble keeping pace late into last season, which is why we saw him dry up.

The most games Hughes played in a college season was 37. We're only 11 games in and Hughes is logging top veteran minutes. I just think it's more likely that he'll hit a similar wall as Pettersson. The year before last, Petey had only played 44 games in Sweden.

Im my view, there are two issues here: potential for burn out, which could increase potential for injury.

How do you guys think Green should manage Hughes's ice time across a full season? Especially if we're in the thick of a playoff spot come February/March. If there's any time we're going to need a fully energized Hughes, it's going to be later in the season.

Should Green start looking ahead in the schedule to giving Hughes nights off? Or should he use games like Florida when we're up 5-1 in the first to reduce his ice time? Or should we keep going the way we are, keep winning games, and look for opportunities to rest Hughes along the way? Can we still win if Hughes ends up burning out?

From your view, what's the best way to approach this?

I thought it looked like Pettersson was because my defended against better as opposed to burning out.

 

Quinn is now first unit power play so 3-4 of those minutes one from there.

 

Also, because Quinn is playing 20 minutes a night Edler doesn't need to be logging 25-28 a night, and IMHO Edler is more important at the moment for the teams success

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As Quinn has shown he is a great player, but even great players that aren't adjusted to the riggers of the NHL get tired, as Petey did last year "his" rookie year.

It wouldn't be a bad idea to call up a few boys from the farm (Sautner has been called up already and Olli J. Or G. Brisebois)and rest Quinn H. so he doesn't get tired and then be susceptible to injury.

Also when we do have injuries we will be more prepared to pick the proper replacements.

 

Edited by DADDYROCK
  • Hydration 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe he used to run cross country and would win from what his father said, so I would think his cardio is pretty good.  

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Wanless said:

I thought it looked like Pettersson was because my defended against better as opposed to burning out.

The competition got more intense but he did admit to not having enough energy later in the season.

 

https://www.sportsnet.ca/hockey/nhl/canucks-elias-pettersson-improving-conditioning-ahead-sophomore-year/

 

"Still, Pettersson freely admits he hit a wall before the end of the Canucks’ 82-game schedule. When it came time to craft his workout plan for this summer, it was built with that fall-off in mind.

 

'I feel like at the end of the season a lot of teams were making a push to make the playoffs, so definitely they were tougher games at the end of the season,' he said. 'And also for myself, I felt like I didn’t have 100 per cent energy coming into every game, so that’s been a big thing for me. That I have better conditioning, I have more strength and power in my legs, and just trying to get stronger and faster.'"

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Dr. Crossbar said:

It's been incredible to see the impact Quinn Hughes has had on our blueline. We're seeing something special now on a nightly basis and it's really just beginning.

Looking at the last five games, though, Hughes is logging 20 minutes per game, the same as Myers and Tanev with Edler still logging the most D minutes at approx 23 minutes.

As we continue to do well, with goals coming and everyone contributing, we're playing at what appears to be break neck pace through 11 games. And if we're going to make the playoffs, we can't afford to let games slip away. We have to keep it up night in and night out.

Last season we saw Pettersson burn out after January and struggle with the lengthy season. He even admitted in the offseason that he had trouble keeping pace late into last season, which is why we saw him dry up.

The most games Hughes played in a college season was 37. We're only 11 games in and Hughes is logging top veteran minutes. I just think it's more likely that he'll hit a similar wall as Pettersson. The year before last, Petey had only played 44 games in Sweden.

Im my view, there are two issues here: potential for burn out, which could increase potential for injury.

How do you guys think Green should manage Hughes's ice time across a full season? Especially if we're in the thick of a playoff spot come February/March. If there's any time we're going to need a fully energized Hughes, it's going to be later in the season.

Should Green start looking ahead in the schedule to giving Hughes nights off? Or should he use games like Florida when we're up 5-1 in the first to reduce his ice time? Or should we keep going the way we are, keep winning games, and look for opportunities to rest Hughes along the way? Can we still win if Hughes ends up burning out?

From your view, what's the best way to approach this?

he's such an effortless skater, I'm not sure it will grind on him the way it does ther players.  I used to coach a kid who was like that.............he could skate for miles and never get tired, probably could have played a full 60 mins if I'd let him

  • Hydration 1
  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Bure_Pavel said:

I believe he used to run cross country and would win from what his father said, so I would think his cardio is pretty good.  

Did they have 6'4", 215lbs behemoths trying to take your head off and/or ram you through the boards on a nightly basis while he was cross country running^_^

 

Making it through a full NHL season is about WAY more than just cardio.  Especially for kids coming from the NCAA ranks, they play very few games/season so they're simply not accustomed to the mental/physical rigors of pro-hockey at this level. 

 

It's a factor I'm sure Green and his coaching/training staff are aware of - especially since it was evident last season where EP noticeably hit a wall.

  • Hydration 1
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Bure_Pavel said:

I believe he used to run cross country and would win from what his father said, so I would think his cardio is pretty good.  

ok but was that full contact cross country? :bigblush:

 

I think the burnout can be a normal part of the maturing process, and helps players know where they need to get to in order to succeed.. 

 

the only real issue I see is the potential for injury, especially with a smaller frame. 

 

on the other hand, Green would be crucified if he healthy scratched the new sensation.. even reduced minutes would ruffle some feathers.. better keep the status quo.. 

  • Hydration 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Dr. Crossbar said:

It's been incredible to see the impact Quinn Hughes has had on our blueline. We're seeing something special now on a nightly basis and it's really just beginning.

Looking at the last five games, though, Hughes is logging 20 minutes per game, the same as Myers and Tanev with Edler still logging the most D minutes at approx 23 minutes.

As we continue to do well, with goals coming and everyone contributing, we're playing at what appears to be break neck pace through 11 games. And if we're going to make the playoffs, we can't afford to let games slip away. We have to keep it up night in and night out.

Last season we saw Pettersson burn out after January and struggle with the lengthy season. He even admitted in the offseason that he had trouble keeping pace late into last season, which is why we saw him dry up.

The most games Hughes played in a college season was 37. We're only 11 games in and Hughes is logging top veteran minutes. I just think it's more likely that he'll hit a similar wall as Pettersson. The year before last, Petey had only played 44 games in Sweden.

Im my view, there are two issues here: potential for burn out, which could increase potential for injury.

How do you guys think Green should manage Hughes's ice time across a full season? Especially if we're in the thick of a playoff spot come February/March. If there's any time we're going to need a fully energized Hughes, it's going to be later in the season.

Should Green start looking ahead in the schedule to giving Hughes nights off? Or should he use games like Florida when we're up 5-1 in the first to reduce his ice time? Or should we keep going the way we are, keep winning games, and look for opportunities to rest Hughes along the way? Can we still win if Hughes ends up burning out?

From your view, what's the best way to approach this?

The key will be beating teams 7-2 so that he only has to play 18 minutes per night!

  • Like 1
  • Hydration 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Fanuck said:

Did they have 6'4", 215lbs behemoths trying to take your head off and/or ram you through the boards on a nightly basis while he was cross country running^_^

 

Making it through a full NHL season is about WAY more than just cardio.  Especially for kids coming from the NCAA ranks, they play very few games/season so they're simply not accustomed to the mental/physical rigors of pro-hockey at this level. 

 

It's a factor I'm sure Green and his coaching/training staff are aware of - especially since it was evident last season where EP noticeably hit a wall.

There's no doubt in my mind Green and co. are aware of it. They have to be. I'm just curious as to the best or most effective way to manage it.

 

If Hughes does get injured, some fans will blame Green for playing him too much. Tough call. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Winning a lot of games, especially if they are blowouts, will allow the Canucks to keep Quinn's icetime down.

 

This season Hughes has averaged 19:18 on the ice when the Canucks win and 22:28 when they lose.

 

  • Hydration 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe just keep him out of the 2nd game when we play two days in a row?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, 6of1_halfdozenofother said:

but for a developing player, there's nothing more important than knowing where your limits are so that you can prepare for (and address) long seasons in future.

 

16 minutes ago, Glug Datt said:

I think the burnout can be a normal part of the maturing process, and helps players know where they need to get to in order to succeed.. 

 

the only real issue I see is the potential for injury, especially with a smaller frame. 

I agree with you both here. There has to be an experience factor. If you have to cross a swamp, you can try to avoid it or look for short cuts, but eventually you have to get dirty and experience the swamp itself to better cross it next time.

 

The wild card is the injury factor. 

 

I'm just big on when you actually have the power of foresight - ala, it happened to Pettersson last season - and it's a real possibility - it may not be the smartest decision to let it happen again with Hughes when you can manage it earlier. Especially if we are driving for playoffs. 

 

It's a fine line to walk really.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Dr. Crossbar said:

 

I agree with you both here. There has to be an experience factor. If you have to cross a swamp, you can try to avoid it or look for short cuts, but eventually you have to get dirty and experience the swamp itself to better cross it next time.

 

The wild card is the injury factor. 

 

I'm just big on when you actually have the power of foresight - ala, it happened to Pettersson last season - and it's a real possibility - it may not be the smartest decision to let it happen again with Hughes when you can manage it earlier. Especially if we are driving for playoffs. 

 

It's a fine line to walk really.

Of course, there are ways that coaches can "soft-land" the rookies into the wall that they should experience (instead of letting them crash into it with unbridled enthusiasm).  But I think that knowing where their wall is and working to push it out for future seasons is the key, and in the long run, will build their ability to tackle their problems professionally.

 

And yes, the potential for injury is a definite concern, but even at his young age, Quinn Hughes looks to be a wily old coyote (not to be confused with the cartoon who keeps getting outdone by the Road Runner), and so he seems to be able to skate his way out of most situations that might flatten less capable skaters.

  • Hydration 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please... take a closer look next time.  Is this the face of someone that will burn out from playing too much?

 

500_F_261501799_L790luBfj8yUFmdDj6J56kmn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hughes is one of those rare guys that skates fast while looking like he isn't trying to get anywhere any time soon. Bure looked like he was sprinting on ice. He was a beautiful skater too, but it didn't look effortless. That will bode well for Hughes' longevity. I think January/February is when the team will have to begin thinking about load management. February has been historically rough on the Canucks and if they start getting hemmed into their own zone on a nightly basis I think that's when you start worrying about Hughes. When he is wheeling the way he has been to start the season, he can do that for days on end. 

  • Hydration 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, BCNate said:

The key will be beating teams 7-2 so that he only has to play 18 minutes per night!

In all seriousness though, last night is a good example of managing his minutes. He plays a lot of PP time, so when we're getting 2 PPs in a game he'll probably be under 20 minutes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.