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canuckster19

Question for Indo-Canadians who grew up in those big houses

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10 hours ago, 189lb enforcers? said:

Instead of asking how many people live there, I’d rather hear how many incomes are in the home. 
 

I admire those willing to put away ego, pride, independence or whatever reason that I, a  dastardly white male, can’t similarly combine residences and finances in this way for certain benefits. 
 

The premise of the OP question feels like it’s a cultural difference, but more recently, perhaps more-so heritage, relating to how wide-open the land was in the Western Hemisphere for the past 300 years, 130 in BC versus India. 
 

I’d be interested in how many incomes are put towards the household because that’s where a ‘strategy’ in a country unaccustomed to such living arrangements and their impact on real estate are interesting to me.  

 

 

I imagine this is going to be reality for many european-canadian families in the future.

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, PunjabiCanucks said:

We built as a family a 5 bedroom house, 4.5 washrooms, 2 kitchens, family dining living room, 2 story, about 3600 square feet.

This is our familys dream house and in the future my parents will live with me/ vice versa. Its in the culture and I see the pros and cons but I love them and want them to stay. 

 

Dream house as my parents/ grandparents first migrated here and lived in a small farm cabin (3 to 5 people) for years before they bought their first house (almost 8 years later).

 

 

 

How extended can it get? For example do you know of any who have two adult siblings and their entire families along with their parents?

Edited by canuckster19

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12 minutes ago, Duodenum said:

Grandparents will have pension income plus whatever work they do while they are still young (ie. Picking berries, farm work). Some will have two pensions (one from India and one from Canada). Instead of using this money for paying for old folks homes or anything, they basically use it for their kids and grandkids. Immigrant parents will be both working usually (cab, truck, construction, factory, other).

A lot of immigrants bought property back when it was cheap as Indians put high value on home ownership. Property value and rent increases put a lot of them into the upper middle class. Many own multiple property now, bringing in rental income. Children have their schooling paid for and stay at home rent free until they get married. Usually leave home with zero debt and decent savings. Huge emphasis on getting educated and high paying jobs or starting their own businesses. 

That is something I regret that my extended family was unable to do. 
Is it cultural?

I know entire blocks in Kamloops that were quickly bought up by organized families that way. I’m jelly. 

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1 minute ago, 189lb enforcers? said:

That is something I regret that my extended family was unable to do. 
Is it cultural?

I know entire blocks in Kamloops that were quickly bought up by organized families that way. I’m jelly. 

I agree, my parents pushed me out of the house, they just never realized how far I would go, I never really wanted to leave Canada, but I had no desire to live on my own.

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Posted (edited)
9 minutes ago, canuckster19 said:

I imagine this is going to be reality for many european-canadian families in the future.

It’s kind of like a monopoly in a way, but legal. 
The structure wasn’t set up for this strategy, so it was susceptible, I guess. 
 

Are we White families too proud or too something else to band together to accomplish something like this real estate strategy? 
 

There are lessons to learn here, hopefully before a SJW arrives to be the surrogate offended-person. I’m thankful for those responses in here. We have a good community. 

Edited by 189lb enforcers?
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6 minutes ago, 189lb enforcers? said:

That is something I regret that my extended family was unable to do. 
Is it cultural?

I know entire blocks in Kamloops that were quickly bought up by organized families that way. I’m jelly. 

 

4 minutes ago, canuckster19 said:

I agree, my parents pushed me out of the house, they just never realized how far I would go, I never really wanted to leave Canada, but I had no desire to live on my own.

I wasn't pushed out, but I started paying rent to them the second I turned 18 and for all intents and purposes, was self-sufficient. Mom maybe picked up a few things for me here and there when she went shopping, but other than that nada. Now, we (my two sisters, mom, dad, and myself) are all spread out and don't get to visit each other nearly as much as we would like.

 

I am also envious of families smart enough to structure themselves this way; the advantages are obvious and so conductive to setting each other up for success. 

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As the saying goes, "united we stand, divided we fall". This pandemic shows us valuable lessons of why living with family is important. Grandmothers or Grandfathers living in old folks home that is risky during this crisis. Or couples living pay cheque to pay cheque, now are probably stressed to get EI cheques and barely could afford to pay rent. Now those families that stick together can combine their income and pay off any mortgages or rents while having enough to eat. I think after this crisis there will be a lot of restructuring for some families.

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2 hours ago, 189lb enforcers? said:

That is something I regret that my extended family was unable to do. 
Is it cultural?

I know entire blocks in Kamloops that were quickly bought up by organized families that way. I’m jelly. 

Yea, it's cultural. 

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My friend lived in one of those. His relatives from India came to work on the farm and live in the house. The farm now is worth millions. He could inherit it all and sell it to retire when his parents pass it on to him. 

They're the smart ones. They live together. One, maybe two mortgages. Instead of us stupid white people taking on individual mortgages and etc. 

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6 hours ago, 189lb enforcers? said:

That is something I regret that my extended family was unable to do. 
Is it cultural?

I know entire blocks in Kamloops that were quickly bought up by organized families that way. I’m jelly. 

A lot Ranch and farm families do this also so I wouldn't say it's a culture thing.

its just putting family first cause if one succeeds they all succeed. 

 

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7 hours ago, canuckster19 said:

How extended can it get? For example do you know of any who have two adult siblings and their entire families along with their parents?

Well it depends on each individual family I'd say... 

 

when a majority of folks migrate here they try sticking together and living as one family. However, the idea becomes everyone wants their privacy and space does run low. Plus one of the best things one can do is to invest and get a 2nd house. Families may do that where they work together buying a second house, just so a smaller family has a house to their name

 

I have a friend who lives in the lower mainland. His dad and his dads brother own a mansion together on a farm. However, each side has their own private entrance and immediate family privacy is maintained. they have family dogs and both grandparents live in the uncle's house. 

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Posted (edited)
On 3/30/2020 at 10:21 AM, 189lb enforcers? said:

It’s kind of like a monopoly in a way, but legal. 
The structure wasn’t set up for this strategy, so it was susceptible, I guess. 
 

Are we White families too proud or too something else to band together to accomplish something like this real estate strategy? 
 

There are lessons to learn here, hopefully before a SJW arrives to be the surrogate offended-person. I’m thankful for those responses in here. We have a good community. 

 

The importance of the family structure seems to have become lost (to a greater degree) with white people. 

 

Maybe having the religious base (or atleast holding onto some of the principals), is something that has benefitted indo Canadian family structure in this way aswell.

 

As our white western society has drifted more into 'post-modernism', whether that be consciously/intentionally, or just as a result of impulse. I guess that could go a bit further into parenting aswell (in some cases anyways), but that's a bit deeper. 

Could be wrong but its a thought. 

 

 

On 3/30/2020 at 10:30 AM, Gäz said:

 

I wasn't pushed out, but I started paying rent to them the second I turned 18 and for all intents and purposes, was self-sufficient. Mom maybe picked up a few things for me here and there when she went shopping, but other than that nada. Now, we (my two sisters, mom, dad, and myself) are all spread out and don't get to visit each other nearly as much as we would like.

 

I am also envious of families smart enough to structure themselves this way; the advantages are obvious and so conductive to setting each other up for success. 

 

Yeah I'm with you on the envy.

 

I hated school pretty much all the way though elementary & secondary school, mostly for social reasons I'd say. So starting work after highschool I was right into paying my own way too. Which is fair & proper. But there was never really that guidance or structure of building towards something communally.

 

My Dad has recently proposed us all going in (my parents, me, my brother & sister) and buying a house (one that would probably require some reno's). None of us are in any position to buy anything ourselves, and our parents are getting closer to retirement. But I've decided I'm going back to school, & I don't have alot of faith in our ability to take on such a commitment collectively as our homelife growing up wasn't (& sometimes still isn't) always the greatest. I appreciate my dad trying to find a way to give us an opportunity though, as much as it would've been better if the groundwork was laid sooner. 

 

 

 

Edited by Smashian Kassian
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