Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Alain Vigneault'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Canucks Discussion
    • Canucks Talk
    • Current Roster
    • Prospects / In the System
    • Proposals and Armchair GM'ing
  • Hockey Discussion
    • Around the NHL
    • Trades, Rumours, Signings
    • AHL, International, and Junior Hockey
    • Fantasy Hockey
  • Off-Topic
    • Off-Topic General
    • Sports
    • Gaming
    • White Noise
    • Mafia Games
    • Creative and Media Forum
  • Support and Feedback
    • Support and Feedback
  • CDC Foodie Group's Topics
  • Victoria Royals Fan Club's Topics
  • The Fruits of CDC's Fruit Talk
  • The Fruits of CDC's Canucks Talk
  • The Fruits of CDC's White Noise
  • The Fruits of CDC's My Little Pony Friendship is Magic
  • Blackjack and Hookers's GDT/PGT
  • Blackjack and Hookers's Hockey Talk
  • Blackjack and Hookers's Post Ya Tunes!
  • Blackjack and Hookers's General Discussion
  • Mafia: The Game's Topics
  • Bring back Nikita Tryamkin - memebership counts!'s Tryamkin talk

Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Canucks 2018/2019 Season Calendar

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 5 results

  1. As Canucks fans continue to live in the here and now, digesting every morsel of Vancouver playoff hockey, it's easy to forget the stepping stones that brought them this far. Mike Gillis, Alain Vigneault, and Rick Bowness have proven the cream rises to the top So often in professional sports, media and critics either directly or indirectly raise the question: What have you done for me lately? For the moment, let's fail to adopt that mentality, and recall a former General Manager for the Vancouver Canucks, Brian Burke. For that matter, let's involve another, Dave Nonis. While it's impossible to say what would have evolved were they to stay longer, the results they produced are irrefutable. The Western conference finals we are witnessing involve a solid number of players that these former GM's brought in during their tenure. You may recall one of them from the third period of Game One - With the game on the line, this Hart Trophy candidate laid his body down to block a slap-shot. Sure, he didn't score a goal or register a point in the game, but his importance to the outcome can't be understated. By now you must realize I'm referring to Daniel Sedin, one half of the oh-so-important tandem Burke brought in. He fervently worked the phones and 1999 Draft floor to obtain the 2nd and 3rd picks to ensure Henrik and Daniel would play together, in Vancouver. Keith Ballard works on his slap-shot under the tutelage of Assistant Coach Rick Bowness (photo courtesy of Harry How/ Getty Images) It would be an understatement to say that, prior to the Sedin-era, the Vancouver Canucks organization had challenges developing talent from within. Suffice it to say that Shawn Antoski, significant though he was in a trade, didn't pan out. Even 'can't misses' such as Petr Nedved, wound up improving their game, but only once they were dealt to another organization. Even more specifically, only now are they seeing dividends from investments developed in Manitoba in the farm system with the Moose. Cory Schneider is the first real bonafide Canuck goaltender produced in quite a span, thanks largely in part to Dave Nonis, who also saw promise in Ryan Kesler, and Alex Burrows. For reference, we need only look back on Troy Gamble, Mike Fountain and Kevin Weekes (the latter brought in via trade). Now, players such as Cody Hodgson and Sergei Shirokov that have been called up to the parent club show similar promise as the next generation of in-house talent. Sergei Shirokov (#25) and Jeff Tambellini (#10) stretch during Western Conference Finals practice at Rogers Arena Ultimately, although GM's have a lot to do with the process, there are others involved that drastically alter the final product that a team ices. One cannot acknowledge the contributions of Burke and Nonis without giving kudos to the Ownership group. Francesco Aquilini, the Managing Director of the Aquilini Investment Group has, like the Vancouver Canucks team he owns, grown and progressed. He hand-picked Mike Gillis, a retired player and player agent, which raised eyebrows across the league. But like so many of his other business decisions, Aquilini paved the way for a seeming stroke of genius. Gillis was instrumental in keeping Henrik and Daniel Sedin away from the free agency market. He flew to Sweden and negotiated identical $30.5 m deals hours before the July 1st deadline. He immediately set his sights on Roberto Luongo, whose four-year contract, signed by Dave Nonis, was coming to an end. Luongo imposed a Sept. 13 deadline before ceasing negotiations for the upcoming season. Several days after, Gillis signed Luongo to an historic 12 year, $64 million contract. Gillis also signed unrestricted free agent Mikael Samuelsson, and emerging Kontinental Hockey League prospect, Sergei Shirokov (pictured earlier). The Canuck Way will soon examine other integral components responsible for the exciting product we see before us in the 2011 Western Conference Finals.
  2. The February 28th trade deadline came and went, with the Vancouver Canucks adding without subtracting. With the additions of Chris Higgins and Maxim Lapierre, the Canucks now find their forward ranks replete with depth and character. Roles once filled by Ryan Kesler and Alex Burrows as agitating, shift disturbing defensive types, have been filled by Lapierre and Higgins. General Manager Mike Gillis added the two players without surrendering a roster player. Instead, he moved 3rd round picks to both the Anaheim Ducks and the Florida Panthers, as well as minor leaguers Joel Perrault and Evan Oberg. "I think we added experience and we added a little bit of a different element than we possess on this team currently." New Canuck recruits, Chris Higgins and Maxim Lapierre Higgins, though currently out of action with a broken thumb, is likely out another 10 games. Though he will debut on the fourth line, there is the opportunity for him to bump up to another line. Higgins, though with only 11 goals and 23 points this year with Florida, had three straight 20 goal years with the Canadiens. "It wasn't predicated on Mason's play at all. What we wanted to do was to strengthen in areas we didn't currently have," Gillis added. Lapierre, who was brought in to center the fourth line between Tanner Glass and Jeff Tambellini, has worked under Alain Vigneault before. He played three seasons of junior hockey in Prince Edward Island, and he credits Vigneault with improving his play within a system. "He was in the NHL before he came to junior so he helped me a lot in my development when I was young and I'm glad to be back with him." He played 5:41 in his first game with the Canucks Tuesday night against the Columbus Blue Jackets, and was a minus one, with two penalty minutes. Maxim Lapierre studied under Alain Vigneault for 3 years in Prince Edward Island Lapierre and Higgins were teammates for three seasons in Montreal. "I have always been a pretty versatile player who can be used in a variety of different situations," Higgins explained. "I am just looking to build chemistry with whoever I am playing with in Vancouver. If I can score some goals, that would be great, but I am just looking forward to finding my niche on the team and being able to contribute every night." Canuck fans were head over heals for this boisterous hit on Jakub Voracek by Dan Hamhuis (photos courtesy of AP Photo) As he quite often does, Alex Burrows added a little humor. In his response to having another Francophone joining the club, he quipped: "It's always good to add a few French Fry guys. There's too many Swedes in this dressing room." Of course, in our household, there's still only one "Little Frenchie". But we certainly are curious to see what dynamic the newest Canucks add.
  3. September is always the toughest to swallow when you're a hockey fan because it's the only month where Opening Night feels so close yet so far away as well. At least the NFL has kicked off. But September may very well be the most important month as well because this is really where teams start to take shape. A great camp from a rookie may change the entire depth chart for certain teams like Florida and Atlanta, who are desperately hoping for a gem to emerge from their ranks to being their re-build. Even Cup contenders like Vancouver, are waiting to see if Cody Hodgson or Jordan Schroeder can make the big club and make an impact. Pittsburgh is waiting to see which of Eric Tangradi, Ryan Craig, Dustin Jeffrey, or whoever they may unearth can step into a top six role. To help you bide the time while waiting for the puck to drop, here are some grumblings... <img src="http://tomferda.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/dustin-byfuglien.jpg"class="imageFloatRightFramed">Craig Ramsay has announced that he will start Dustin Byfuglien on defense. I guess if you're going to spend the majority of the season treading water and trying to keep pucks out of the night it's more logical to use your biggest player to clear the crease rather than cause havoc in the offensive zone. People think because Byfuglien can play defense he's versatile, but he really isn't. Anyone who watched him play this year knows that he's an atrocious skater and given the emergence of young defensemen with extraordinary skating ability, like Drew Doughty, Erik Johnson, and John Carlson, you'd have to think if this is a good move. Byfuglien won't help with the transition game - instead, he's more like an Andy Sutton-type with better hands. If you look at the players who can play both defense and offense, they're mostly guys who really don't do either very well. Ian White aside, the list includes the likes of Christoph Schubert, Matt Carkner, and Wade Belak - a pretty mediocre group. Given the right environment, like lining up besides two potential Hall of Famers like Jonathan Toews and Patrick Kane, Byfuglien will succeed, but not in Atlanta. So long as Ron Wilson is behind the bench at the Air Canada Centre, Tomas Kaberle won't play... according to his father. It was a non-headline at the beginning and I'm going to sound like a broken record, but the Leafs desperately need him on the blueline. I don't think Brian Burke was ever really dangling him but I do believe at least 10 teams have called and if they have a good offer, you listen. He's a great puck-moving defenseman with a very affordable salary, which in the CBA world pretty much counts as a first round pick. Without him the Leafs won't have anyone to spring Phil Kessel on a breakaway. Kaberle is still the Leafs' best player. Jersey numbers have a way of sticking in hockey fans' heads. 99 is synonymous with Wayne Gretzky, 66 with Mario Lemieux, and 4 with Bobby Orr. In Edmonton, 4 evokes memories of Kevin Lowe, the Oilers' great blueliner during their 'City of Champions' years. When I heard that Taylor Hall was going to wear that number, my stomach did a little flip. Lowe's number is not retired by the Oilers so it's fair game, but it's a number that hasn't been used since 1992, Lowe's final season in Edmonton in which he was also captain. I'm obviously making too big of a deal out of it but I wish Hall picked a different number and blazed a path of his own. But then again, it's Lowe's number to give and no one is really going to watch the Oilers this year anyway (which makes them dangerous, actually, like Colorado and Phoenix last year). The Blues weren't very involved during free agency (they didn't have to) but did get an upgrade in goal with Jaroslav Halak. Habs fans still are still swooning over their playoff hero during a recent visit to Montreal. But let's put things into perspective: Ville Leino will not be a force in the regular season, at best a second line player, and Dustin Byfuglien won't score 41 goals in the regular season. Playoff heroics has a funny way of driving up a player's stock and more often than not those players become way overrated. The Blues should be excited because they've finally found a legitimate no. 1 goalie but Habs fans shouldn't forget that Carey Price also managed to post a respectable .912 SV%. If you're expecting Halak to be all-star material I wouldn't bank on it. Count me as a skeptic. Speaking of skepticism, Mike Modano evokes none from me. Wearing the unfamiliar number 90 and even more unfamiliar red and white, Modano has an opportunity to finish his career a winner, at home, no less. The Michigan native signed a one-year contract for one last kick at the can and the stars have lined up for him. Chicago lost quality players and the Wings have Johan Franzen, Jiri Hudler, and Niklas Lidstrom back. The Wings are poised to re-take the Central Division title and a little bit of luck and staying healthy could mean the Wings could be back in the finals for a third time in four years. Modano won't have the pressure of having to score and his defensive game has improved by leaps and bounds the past 5 years. The Wings' puck-possession game suits him well with his deft hands and great skating. One of the more intriguing training camp stories this year (there's always a few - who's going to be our Sergei Shirokov this year?) has been the Stars' invite to Jonathan Cheechoo. Cheechoo's fall from grace has been well documented but if anyone can find your offensive mojo it's Marc Crawford. The Stars can score goals in bunches if they can keep the puck out of their own zone long enough with Brad Richards dishing out passes while James Neal, Jamie Benn, and Loui Eriksson finish them off. My prediction is that Cheechoo does land himself a contract from GM Joe Nieuwendyk but there's no returning to form here. I think it's case-closed that Cheechoo's 56-goal season was a major fluke and more Joe Thornton than him. I also would've rather kept Modano rather than invite Cheechoo. There's been reports (sorry, no link) that Bobby Ryan is close to inking an extension with the Ducks but it'll be on the Ducks' terms, not his. Reportedly the main holdup between the two sides is length, with Ryan wishing to become a UFA as early as possible while the Ducks hope to have him signed beyond that, ensuring that Ryan, Corey Perry, and Ryan Getzlaf won't all bolt at the same time. Thanks for the paranoia, Miami Heat. LeBron James' summer fiasco has changed free agency forever. That's his legacy. Forget about the championships, he's all smoke and dollar signs. <img src="http://i.cdn.turner.com/si/multimedia/photo_gallery/0810/nhl.rookies.to.watch/images/cody-hodgson.jpg"class="imageFloatLeftFramed">If you're banking on either Schroeder or Hodgson to make this squad, the safe bet is Schroeder. It wouldn't hurt for both to return to the AHL for more seasoning and the Canucks have zero need to rush them but at this point Schroeder has at least proven he's capable of producing at the AHL level. The Canucks recently announced that Hodgson won't be attending the rookie tournament in Penticton after doctors couldn't declare him fit to play. Alain Vigneault, never one to shy away from challenging a player's mental toughness publicly, has refused to elaborate but it doesn't take a genius to know that he's not particularly happy with this whole fiasco. But neither is Hodgson - I'm sure he's frustrated too. It's been two years since his misdiagnosed back but it's been disappointment after disappointment, some of them undeserved. He got cut because he wasn't 100%. He lost out the MVP award at the World Juniors to John Tavares even though he was more deserving. Tavares will now have at least 2 NHL seasons under his belt before Hodgson. Underclassman Schroeder is leapfrogging him on the depth charts. However, let's not panic - Hodgson still has a bright future and to give up on him now would be a mistake. Hodgson is once again a big fixture in the training camp news wire and he'll really need to impress if he wants to make it. For now, the odds are stacked against him and it'll be another long test of his character. Oh, and Sidney Crosby hits home runs.
  4. <img src="http://cdn.nhl.com/canucks/images/upload/2010/01/jan1710_skills17_rr.jpg" class="imageFloatLeftFramed">Jersey change? It was brought to our attention by Icethetics.info in blog posts on both December 1, 2009 and December 3, 2009 that the Canucks may be switching to their modernized stick-in-rink jersey as their home jersey for the 2010-11 NHL campaign. It's interesting to note that on Sunday at the team's annual SuperSkills event, Team Blue wore the team's third jersey featuring the modernized stick-in-rink as the main crest and the Johnny V logo on the shoulders as opposed to their home jersey with the orca on the front and the modernized stick-in-rink on the shoulders. If something isn't up, it's a bit weird that the Canucks would choose to wear their thirds as opposed to their home jersey. Needless to say, we know which one the Canucks like better as an organization. However, the Canucks mascot Fin and the player's kids were wearing the home jersey. Maybe it's an attempt to throw the fans off and make the switch less obvious, but also ever so slightly hinting towards a possible switch. The colours of the Canucks are awesome, but the logo needs to change. The orca logo was designed with blue-silver-red in mind, not the blue-white-green of our current jersey. <img src="http://cdn.nhl.com/canucks/images/upload/2009/12/dec0709_nashville36_rr.jpg" class="imageFloatRightFramed">Vigneault gets it right in the third I don't like to question the coach's decision because he is the one getting paid the big bucks to do it, but it completely puzzled me as to why the plan Wednesday night was scratch Kyle Wellwood, move Steve Bernier to the second line, move Demitra to centre on the third line, and drop Samuelsson down to the third line. Glass has been a great story this year, coming to training camp this year, he was expected to be with the Manitoba Moose all season long and probably won't even get a sniff at the NHL with the Canucks. He defied the odds made the team and has set career highs in every statistical category. However, Glass is not a third line player; he has four goals and five assists all season. Glass is a banger and is not going to snipe any passes he gets from Demitra. News broke late that Rick Rypien had the stomach flu and they could not get Ryan Johnson of long-term injured reserve in time, Wellwood had his spot in the lineup salvaged. Vigneault puts the fourth line player in Glass on the third line and puts the third line player in Wellwood on the fourth line. Puzzling. The lines of Raymond-Kesler-Bernier and Glass-Demitra-Samuelsson all looked lost out there especially Glass. Thankfully, Vigneault saw that and reunited the Raymond-Kesler-Samuelsson unit and formed the dream third line of many Canucks fans of Demitra-Wellwood-Bernier. Wellwood's played with Steve Bernier for the most part in their times as Canucks and Wellwood has displayed the ability to put up points when put with skilled players. Raymond, Kesler, and Samuelsson are a line that have been together all season long. It ain't broken, why fix it? The second and third lines didn't generate the goal to tie the game, but they were a threat to score and put on pressure in the offensive zone. Tonight's going to be an easy decision on whose going to come out of the lineup for Ryan Johnson's expected return. Tanner Glass, Jannik Hansen, and Darcy Hordichuk then didn't see a single shift five on five in the third period, so it's easy to say one of them will come out. <img src="http://cdn.nhl.com/canadiens/images/upload/2009/04/laraque_bruins.jpg" class="imageFloatLeftFramed">Nylander treatment for Laraque News broke this morning that the Montreal Canadiens will part with veteran enforcer Georges Laraque because head coach Jacques Martin has lost confidence in Laraque and thinks the team will be better off without Laraque. At this moment, it doesn't appear Laraque will be placed on waivers or traded, but rather will be getting the "Michael Nylander treatment." Which is we will continue to pay your salary, but you are not welcomed to be near the team at all and you can just sit at home all day. I personally believe that you need an enforcer in the NHL despite the fact this is the post-lockout era. Just take a look at last night for the Canadiens, Carey Price gets run over by Cam Janssen (or you could say Janssen got run over by Price), but would that have happened had Laraque been in the lineup? I would like to lean towards no. Take the Washington Capitals for example, who are without an enforcer, star defenceman Mike Green gets hit from behind by David Koci and gets blindsided by Colton Orr, and their captain Alex Ovechkin almost had to fight Steve Downie of the Tampa Bay Lightning. From a previous blog post of mine: Having an enforcer is important and look no further than the last four Stanley Cup champions coming out of the lockout. Last year, Eric Godard was there to serve and protect for the Pittsburgh Penguins. In 2008, there was Aaron Downey on the Detroit Red Wings. In 2007, there was of course George Parros and Shawn Thornton on Brian Burke's Anaheim Ducks. In 2006, there was Jesse Boulerice for the Carolina Hurricanes, albeit for four months of the season before being traded as part of the Doug Weight deal. Questionable hits so far this year in the NHL this season have also been committed to mostly teams that have lacked a heavyweight enforcer. Both Jarkko Ruutu and Alexander Ovechkin's respective hits on Patrick Kaleta of the Buffalo Sabres, David Koci on Washington's Mike Green, Ovechkin on Tim Gleason of Carolina, Mike Richards on David Booth of Florida, Carcillo's cheapshot on Matt Bradley of Washington in a fight, or Georges Laraques knee on Niklas Kronwall of Detroit. Oh noes! This briefly appeared on the TSN.ca Ice Chips page: The whole Canucks team is injured and will be missing tonight's game!
  5. <img src="http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3365/3609026921_4f821f6de1_m.jpg" class="imageFloatLeftFramed">With no Toronto Maple Leafs game on the NHL schedule tomorrow, it is expected we will see Jim Hughson calling the play-by play for the Canucks and Pittsburgh Penguins tilt at General Motors Place with Craig Simpson providing colour commentary from the booth and Glenn Healy between the benches, CBC's top team. The only other Canadian matchup sees the Montreal Canadiens hosting the Ottawa Senators at the Bell Centre. Since being replaced by Hughson's as the network's top announcer, Bob Cole has been the play-by-play announcer for all Canadiens games on CBC with Guy Carbonneau and Greg Millen occasionally providing colour commentary. Effectively freeing Hughson to work the Canucks broadcast. Also worth noting is that Canucks head coach Alain Vigneault will be joining Glenn Healy and Scott Oake on After Hours. Submit your questions now. This will be the second-to-last time we will be hearing Jim Hughson doing play-by-play for the Canucks this season. The last one comes January 30th against the Toronto Maple Leafs at 4pm PST as part of the Hockey Day in Canada festivities. Unless the Toronto Maple Leafs make the playoffs or the Canucks fail to make it, we will most certainly see Hughson calling the Canucks playoff games. Amazing, eh? No Leafs game on a Saturday. Photo: Stephen Dyrga