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Mulcair Clarifies Stance On Pot Decriminalization


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Mulcair clarifies stance on pot decriminalization

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NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair addresses the Economic Club of Canada in Ottawa, Thursday April 5, 2012. (Fred Chartrand / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Updated: Sat Apr. 21 2012 9:57:08 PM

The Canadian Press

OTTAWA — Tom Mulcair is clearing the air on pot, clarifying that he doesn't believe anyone should go to jail for possessing a couple of joints.

The freshly minted NDP leader created confusion about his party's position recently when he said decriminalization of marijuana would be a mistake.

But it appears he was actually referring to outright legalization of marijuana.

"Terms like legalization and decriminalization are often inappropriately used interchangeably," Mulcair spokesman George Soule said Friday.

"But be very clear that Thomas Mulcair does not believe that anyone should be going to jail for possession of just a small amount of pot. Criminalization is not the answer for any area of social policy."

Last month, shortly before winning the NDP leadership contest, Mulcair was asked directly by Global TV's Tom Clark whether he supports decriminalizing marijuana.

"No," Mulcair said then. "I think that would be a mistake because the information that we have right now is that the marijuana that's on the market is extremely potent and can actually cause mental illness."

The comment appeared to be a reversal of the NDP's long-standing support for decriminalization.

It came back to haunt Mulcair on Friday, the annual April 20 counterculture "pot holiday," as Liberals attempted to turn marijuana into a defining issue in the battle for centre-left young voters.

Young Liberals plastered Mulcair's quote on handouts and posters to be circulated at pro-pot rallies in Ottawa, Toronto and Vancouver. They were also to distribute buttons promoting the Liberal party's new policy in favour of legalization -- a position adopted at the party's convention in January.

"This is the new NDP and we are going to tell people about it," said Young Liberal president Samuel Lavoie.

"Mr. Mulcair would continue to punish pot smokers, would continue the Harper war on drugs -- a war even Mr. (Prime Minister Stephen) Harper now admits is 'not working.' ... Only the Liberal party will take Canada in a new direction and end Mr. Harper's failed war on drugs."

Alyx Holland, national director of the Young Liberals, dismissed Soule's clarification, saying support for decriminalization is not reflected in Mulcair's comments to Global TV. She acknowledged that Liberals see potential for turning marijuana into a wedge issue that will benefit her party among youth voters.

Meanwhile, an aromatic haze floated over the front lawns of Parliament Hill and provincial legislatures as pot lovers openly defied the law, in plain view of the police.

At Manitoba's legislature, hundreds of people gathered, many openly smoking marijuana. Police expected more than 1,000 by day's end. Many hot-dog cart owners were in place before 9 a.m. to secure a spot near the hungry crowd.

About a dozen police officers stood by and watched for trouble, but police had no plans to make any arrests for toking.

"We aren't anticipating arresting for simple possession-related offences," Const. Natalie Aitken said.

"While it's a behaviour that we do not condone and we do not support, at this time that's not something that we will be following through with charges. However, we are here, we are in full force if there's any type of acts of violence, if there's any property damage."

Police were also keeping an eye on those who left the area by car for signs of drug impairment, Aitken said.

RCMP said up to 5,000 people turned out for the hour-long rally on Parliament Hill, which ended peacefully.

"There's nothing wrong with smoking weed," said Ottawa protester Austin Hazell. "I just hang out at home, just kick it, you know.

"Work, take care of stuff, just get high. It's what I do."

In downtown Vancouver, the event took on a quasi-official, festival like feel, with orange-and-white city barricades blocking off an entire block at the side of the art gallery.

While a handful of police and fire officials watched, vendors sold tacos and sausages, tie-dyed shirts, bongs and pipes, "weed budder" and hash-oil treats, joints, and cookies.

Some sat on the pavement, toking on joints and listening to bands performing live and on stage.

Similar so-called "4/20" rallies were held across North America on Friday.

The number 420 has been associated with marijuana use for decades, though its origins are murky. Its use as code for marijuana spread among California pot users in the 1960s, and spread among followers of the Grateful Dead.

In Canada, the NDP was the first national party to support decriminalization, a position eventually adopted by the Liberal government of Jean Chretien. His government actually introduced a bill to remove criminal penalties for possession of small amounts of marijuana but it was not passed before the Liberals were defeated by Stephen Harper's Conservatives.

Harper has gone in the opposite direction, imposing mandatory minimum sentences for possession of as few as six pot plants. And although he last week admitted the war on drugs hasn't worked, Harper has categorically rejected decriminalization or legalization as solutions to the problem.

Unlike Harper, Soule said, Mulcair believes government policy should focus "on harm reduction rather than criminalization."

He said Mulcair also advocates creating a royal commission, "bringing together the best social, medical and law enforcement expertise" to recommend the best solutions for the future.

Soule noted that the last time Canada conducted an in-depth study of the recreational use of drugs was 40 years ago, with the LeDain commission.

http://montreal.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20120421/mulcair-clarifies-stance-pot-decriminalization-120421/20120421/?hub=MontrealHome

Mr. Mulcair, may I direct you to exhibits A and B and C:

A.molson.jpg

B.20110130-170123.jpg

C.Canadian-Club-Whisky-Tonga-Hide-A-Case-523x330.jpg

All easily available at 417 locations of:

img18413485023d1d4d42.jpg

More potent? Ban extra strength Aspirin, too. What a stupid thing to say. :picard:

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As much as I like Mulcair and his most of his policies/viewpoints, this is one that I am not in agreement with. Decriminalization is only the first step. Marijuana must be legalized for several reasons:

1. Human Rights - It is our right to ingest what we wish, how we wish, when we wish, as long as we are not directly threatening or hurting another individual. Banning things like marijuana is an attack on our rights and freedoms as human beings.

2. Medicinal Benefits - There are handfuls of medicinal benefits that come from marijuana. Everything from the omega 3 fatty acids, to the pain killing effects from the THC. This plant has the ability to heal and science is backing up the claim. ANyone who says otherwise is simply ignorant or in denial of the truth.

3. Financial Benefits - While lineups in hospitals increase, classroom sizes double, roads go unrepaired, schools close down and social funding is cut in several spots, we continue to outlaw a plant that, in terms of just the smokers alone, is a $10Billion market in BC alone. Top that off with the materials that can be made from hemp for small fractions of what current products cost to make, and we are looking at a single plant that could be putting us back into the black in our budget books and out of debt PERMANENTLY. Never mind the amount of money wasted on jails, court proceedings, extra and unnecessary police squads etc.

4. Environmental Benefits - Products made out of hemp are much more eco-friendly, Ropes, clothing, arts and crafts materials, oils and even furniture come with a very dangerous and often unhealthy production and assembly. Using hemp would greatly reduce our greenhouse gases, natural resource consumption and overall carbon footprint. Again, this is fact not opinion.

5. Crime reduction - This is a big one for people. Marijuana, as previously mentioned in my post, is providing criminal organizations with over $10 Billion dollars in BC alone each year. That's just in our own back yard. most of our major crime organizations are global or at the very least, country wide. Imagine the money that comes from all the marijuana sales in Canada annually. I bet the number is big enough to make anyone's eyes pop out of their heads. This also ties into reduction in costs for extra police units, jail cells, court proceedings and crown appointed lawyers. That is hundreds of millions of dollars YET AGAIN being pissed away on a war on a plant.

I don't want to create too big on a wall of text but these are 5 of the most major issues (in my opinion) surrounding this ridiculous war on a plant. I don't see how anything other than full legalization could ever be the answer.

For those of you who shun it because of religious reasons - Anyone who follows one of the major Abraham religions (Ex: Christianity, Muslim, Judaism). In 'God's' own words in Genesis 1:16 "I Have given you all the seed bearing plants on Earth to use" (give or take a word or two depending on which version of which holy book you read)

I openly challenge anyone to give me a solid, logical and factual argument as to why marijuana should continue to be illegal.

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Politics are just like TV channels. You pay for a package of 90% crap and 10% what you actually want, and then something you enjoy watching the most starts showing crap about Ancient Aliens and the Shroud of Turin.

We need a new method of electing leadership that doesn't include packaged deals. Mulcair shouldn't get a mulligan for having an opinion contradicted by evidence anymore than Harper should.

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"Only the Liberal party will take Canada in a new direction and end Mr. Harper's failed war on drugs."

Yeah right. Smart of the Liberals to try to capitalize on this issue however.

Mulcair won't even support the NDP's timid policy of decriminalization. And the pathetic thing is that most smokers do not even vote, or they vote for parties that support the persecution of pot smokers. How am I supposed to tell people to vote NDP when they hear this from the guy who is supposed to be the alternative to Steven Harper?

As for mental illness I am reminded of this quote, often incorrectly attributed to Tim Leary: "LSD is a drug that occasionally causes psychotic behaviour in people who have not taken it."

Thomas Mulcair - go f*** yourself.

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Politics are just like TV channels. You pay for a package of 90% crap and 10% what you actually want, and then something you enjoy watching the most starts showing crap about Ancient Aliens and the Shroud of Turin.

We need a new method of electing leadership that doesn't include packaged deals. Mulcair shouldn't get a mulligan for having an opinion contradicted by evidence anymore than Harper should.

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