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rgrewal3

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Honda seems to be closing in on the problem of availability.

http://automobiles.h...gy-station.aspx

The Home Energy Station

Honda has operated an experimental Home Energy Station in Torrance, California, since 2003. The Home Energy Station, which generates hydrogen from natural gas, is designed to provide heat and electricity for the home through fuel cell cogeneration and to supply fuel for a hydrogen-powered fuel cell electric vehicle.

Honda has worked in cooperation with technology partner Plug Power, Inc., to reduce size and increase convenience in each subsequent generation of the Home Energy Station. In 2007 Honda developed the still experimental Home Energy Station IVwhich is even more efficient and better suited for home use than previous versions. CO2 emissions for a household using the Home Energy Station are 30% lower than those for an average household using a gasoline-engine car and commercial electricity and heat.

Honda believes in a future society powered by hydrogen, and we are serious about our commitment to contribute to the development of useful refueling solutions.

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Wow great topic about power and renewable resources sprung up out of this and the root of electricity and emissions. Great read guys. Thing is I did the research and it seems an electric car would cover the cost of gasoline in no time (on car companies websites and other pro-electric car sites, so obviously biased opinions)

Does an electric car really save you that much? Cause I feel like a hybrid doesn't when sometimes the same model of a vehicle can be up to 10-15K more for the same car but hybrid which makes no sense to buy financially. However an electric car seems as if it would make much more sense because the cost of electricity is much less and, I know this is wrong but, you wouldn't be plugging it in at your own house all the time :P thus saving costs from that too.

From an environmental perspective I see people's arguments from both sides of it but I still feel as if electricity is still better to be burning rather than gasoline even when looking at what power an electrical plant and so forth.

But electrical cars are ugly for the most part, minus a Tesla, and batteries don't last very long.

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I drive a 3 cyl Geo Metro. I keep it well maintained and has been an amazing little death trap. Gas mileage is awesome, but lacks a little in the creature comforts. I think I'll stick with these gas misers till the electrics bugs are worked out.

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I drive a 3 cyl Geo Metro. I keep it well maintained and has been an amazing little death trap. Gas mileage is awesome, but lacks a little in the creature comforts. I think I'll stick with these gas misers till the electrics bugs are worked out.

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Most people who drive "electric" or hybrid cars aren't doing for the environment, they're doing for the fuel economy. But in reality it's not what you drive, it's how you drive. People drive like fools, accelerating too fast and braking too hard.

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Most people who drive "electric" or hybrid cars aren't doing for the environment, they're doing for the fuel economy. But in reality it's not what you drive, it's how you drive. People drive like fools, accelerating too fast and braking too hard.

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Yep, over 50 MPG. People have a stigma against diesels though. When they think of diesel they think of old, loud, stinky, dirty motors. None of this is true at all though and they are actually far better for the environment than an equivalent gas powered vehicle.

I'm not sure why we have so few diesel vehicles in North America, in Europe they apparently have way more. Heck, they even have a diesel Ford Ranger over there. THAT, is awesome. A 2.2 liter four-cylinder with 276 ft-lbs of torque or a 3.2 five-cylinder with 346 ft-lbs of torque. That little 2.2 probably gets like 40 MPG. Seriously, who wouldn't want that if they were considering a ranger? No... instead we have a 3.5L ecoboost F150 that gets about 18 MPG. News flash, the monster of a motor 7.3L diesel of the past got the same economy and had over double the displacement. (Not a knock on the ecoboost, I think it's a pretty awesome little motor.. a step in the right direction for gas powered vehicles)

I really wish the public would hop on board the diesel bandwagon.

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Over 50? I used to have one.. the mileage advertised on diesel Jetta's and Golf's are a bit exaggerated. More like 35-40 on the Golf and 30-38 on Jetta's.

Edit: And I think I know why, the mileage shown here in Canada is window sticker-like manufacturer MPG based on unrealistic driving. If you want more realistic MPG based on how people actually drive look at the US's fueleconomy.gov.

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You're right, here's another example.

Toyota dealerships here in Toronto say the 2005-2007 Prius is almost 60 MPG, before 2007'ish, the US advertise mileage was 60-65 MPG. I've driven one of those too. It's 39-50. In fact I think the Prius is precisely one of the reasons why the states changed the way MPG is advertised. The manufacturer's version (what we still see here in Canada) is highly inflated based upon the way a very very small percentage of people actually drive. It's across the board for diesel, lower and higher octane petrol fuelled vehicles, and hybrids.

When it comes to advertising I'm quite pet peeve'ish about it. The way MPG's are advertised here is ridiculous.

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Ya but what's that cost? Still easier to just buy an inexpensive high mileage car and use the extra money to better insulate the house and in this part of the world put in a heat pump. Guarantee that reduces CO2 even more than their system and actually reduces your costs to boot.....

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I drive a 2001 Honda Prelude and if I drive like a grandmother, I can get about 600 KM out of a 60 litre tank. But if I push it, I get like 350 KM.

My wife's got a 2007 Civic Sedan and I got 800 KM out of a 50 litre tank when driving to Edmonton in 2009. The tank wasn't completely empty when I stopped for gas. The low fuel light hadn't turned on yet.

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I drive a 2001 Honda Prelude and if I drive like a grandmother, I can get about 600 KM out of a 60 litre tank. But if I push it, I get like 350 KM.

My wife's got a 2007 Civic Sedan and I got 800 KM out of a 50 litre tank when driving to Edmonton in 2009. The tank wasn't completely empty when I stopped for gas. The low fuel light hadn't turned on yet.

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