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Listen to these guys. It's a fact that every single person to ever buy a motorcycle dies or ends up in a wheel chair.

A fact!

And you're not allowed to experience new things. Don't even think about rock climbing, because you'll end up dead or in a wheel chair, or worse!!!!

Don't sky diving. Dead

Don't go bungee jumping, definitely gonna die.

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I did this last year.

I went to Pacific Riding School, linked above. Fantastic, can't say enough about them. Even if you don't end up getting a bike, doing the lessons with them is worth it. They'll scare some sense into you, and won't let you go until you're a decent driver. You do a couple rides through the city at the end of the course, and it short-tracks your licensing a bit.

I got a Kawasaki Ninja 250r, insurance was about $1800 for the year, but you'll probably only have it covered for 8 months(riding in the winter months is not worth it). Make sure you get a bike which reflects your skill level. A 1000cc sportbike will kill you. Start small. I could out-accelerate and power by pretty much anything in the little 250 anyway. Insurance is cheaper on smaller bikes too.

The gear is expensive, and it's a bit of a PITA to take everything off and on again. Always put it on though, a little convenience beats road rash or a cracked skull. Bike maintenance can also be fairly expensive, as they wear much quicker than cars and need more tuning.

Riding is the most fun I've ever had. Ever. Fun in the city, fun on the highways, more fun on the backroads. It's more dangerous than a car, but not as dangerous as commonly thought. I believe the accident/fatality rate is roughly the same as scuba-diving. It's a completely different experience; you're more tuned into the road and your surroundings(because you have to be). If you're defensive it's pretty safe. Definitely not for everyone, but worth trying.

Hope that helps a bit. I sold my bike at the end of last season, but looking to start again next year on something bigger.

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I've been riding since 1985.

Don't buy a crotch rocket as your first bike.

Take a safety course.

Don't be one of those bikers that gives the rest of us a bad name (you know - the guys who zig zag in and out of traffic and travel at speeds beyond what the rest of the traffic flow is doing).

My first bike was a Shadow 500 - seating position is low to the ground and easy to maneuver.

If you're going on the highway and/or looking at doing some bike trips - you need a heavier bike - it's just more confortable and doesn't get knocked around as much by the wind.

My next bike was a Sport Tourer - VFR800 - it was way faster than a cruiser and was great for long distance bike trips.

I have gone back to the cruiser though - why? I enjoy it more - so much nicer to enjoy the scenery / ride.

Current rid is a VTX1300.

Whatever bike you're thinking of getting - find a forum and participate ahead of time - find out all the idiosyncrasies of it - you might not want it and/or you may want it more.

Wear proper gear (motorcycle gear) at all times - boots, pants, jacket, gloves - even if it's plus 30. I prefer a full face helmet.

My gear is textile based with armour for shins/knees, hips, elbows, shoulders and back.

Don't buy a crotch rocket as a first bike and remember to keep the rubber side down.

Welcome to the world of riding and be prepared to spend money!

sigpic52662_3.gif

Edit: BTW, don't listen to the cagers.

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Be extremely careful when you see a car coming your way with it's left turn signal on.

IIRC most accidents involve a car turning left in front of a biker and over the hood you go.

Somehow they just don't see you on the bike,or probably they don't see you as a threat to their safety.

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I did this last year.

I went to Pacific Riding School, linked above. Fantastic, can't say enough about them. Even if you don't end up getting a bike, doing the lessons with them is worth it. They'll scare some sense into you, and won't let you go until you're a decent driver. You do a couple rides through the city at the end of the course, and it short-tracks your licensing a bit.

I got a Kawasaki Ninja 250r, insurance was about $1800 for the year, but you'll probably only have it covered for 8 months(riding in the winter months is not worth it). Make sure you get a bike which reflects your skill level. A 1000cc sportbike will kill you. Start small. I could out-accelerate and power by pretty much anything in the little 250 anyway. Insurance is cheaper on smaller bikes too.

The gear is expensive, and it's a bit of a PITA to take everything off and on again. Always put it on though, a little convenience beats road rash or a cracked skull. Bike maintenance can also be fairly expensive, as they wear much quicker than cars and need more tuning.

Riding is the most fun I've ever had. Ever. Fun in the city, fun on the highways, more fun on the backroads. It's more dangerous than a car, but not as dangerous as commonly thought. I believe the accident/fatality rate is roughly the same as scuba-diving. It's a completely different experience; you're more tuned into the road and your surroundings(because you have to be). If you're defensive it's pretty safe. Definitely not for everyone, but worth trying.

Hope that helps a bit. I sold my bike at the end of last season, but looking to start again next year on something bigger.

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The estimations for insurance are around what I paid. I bought a 600 honda sport bike when I was 18.

The safety class does get you through the dumb obstacle course. They are pretty tough on you and if your bike isn't suited for it, you'll have a hard time. I failed twice because I couldn't do the maneuvers with my butt on the seat...It just didn't work with the sport bike.

It has been quite a few years now and I have been looking in the lists for another one......There's a nice TL000R on the island that I Was thinking of checking out.

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Had a Ninja 600 back in the early 1990s when I lived in Victoria. Didnt take a course, didnt buy the proper gear, taught myself how to ride it, rode daily for over a year before i got my license and when it came time to move to Vancouver I rode it less than a week here before selling it because it doesnt matter how good a rider you are, some idiot in a SUV is gonna roll right over you cause there are really bad and careless drivers all over the roads here.

PS: if you get a sport bike, get a radar detector under the fairing. Saved my ass a few times.

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Get a riding course done, another vote goes to pacific riding school in surrey, only idiots doing stupid things on road get into accidents, if you follow the road rules and be very defensive and aware of your surroundings yiu'll be fine. Don't forget to buy full gear starting with gloves all the way to your boots.

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Had a Ninja 600 back in the early 1990s when I lived in Victoria. Didnt take a course, didnt buy the proper gear, taught myself how to ride it, rode daily for over a year before i got my license and when it came time to move to Vancouver I rode it less than a week here before selling it because it doesnt matter how good a rider you are, some idiot in a SUV is gonna roll right over you cause there are really bad and careless drivers all over the roads here.

PS: if you get a sport bike, get a radar detector under the fairing. Saved my ass a few times.

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Take a good beginers riding course it is the best thing you can do. Start with a small bike like a 250cc or even a dirt bike. As Heritic said stay away from liter class sport bikes or larger unlimiteds until you get some time on a bike. I ride a ZX14 ninja and even though it is very tame and laid back for a nice cruise there is always satan that resides in the right hand grip. 0-186mph in 19 seconds is not a bike for newby riders. Be smart and safe and have fun you wont regret it.

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Riding is a blast but I can't think of many places where there are more hassles with motorcycling than the Lower Mainland.

If you can get outside of the city and into the countryside easily its fine, otherwise it gets old fast unless your a poser who just rides up and down a strip a few timed and then parks it where everyone can see it.

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