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Chik-Fil-A's Anti Gay Bill


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First off I would like to say, this information came from a source that would like to be remained as

anonymous,

Although this is on Facebook and some of you have probably seen it.

"Chik-Fil-A's "Charity" Branch, donated a very large sum of money (Undisclosed) to an organization called "Exodus International"

"Exodus International's" main goal is to completely wipe homo-sexuality off the planet.

To send a greater "message" Chik-Fil-A sent international representatives to Uganda, what was

"Originally" just a message, quickly turned into a bill called "Kill The Gays" which allows Homosexuals to be hung or executed in Public."

I honestly am in disbelief, these sick twisted people plan to kill millions for something that cant control and don't deserve.

These people don't deserve the briefest sniff of oxygen.

Take it for what its worth, mods please don't lock this.

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Get back to me when it is substantiated.

They are a very easy target right now and, while I don't agree with their stances, this is just slander until there is a source behind it.

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Ugh....Exodus International makes me sick as much as any group that think there's a 'cure' for being gay.

Today is National Chick-fil-A Appreciation Day, at least according to Mike Huckabee. The evangelical minister and former presidential candidate — along with

Rick Santorum, Sarah Palinand a host of other Christianist culture warriors — is mounting acounteroffensive after big-city mayors tried to shoo the Southern chicken chain from their borders, the Jim Henson Co. pulled its toys from Chick-fil-A’s kids’ meals, and the fast-food company has become a flash point for the whole LGBT community and all their sympathizers in the nonfundamentalist real world.

And somehow I have found myself on the wrong side of this controversy. Some background: I

wrote back in February that I liked Chick-fil-A’s food, and that as an American, I felt bound to respect its owners’ opinions, however wrong I might think them, as separate from a business whose practices and product seemed above reproach. (This is the New York Timesofficial position, more or less, and it’s wrong too.) I also pointed to One Million Moms’ idiotic attempted boycott of JCPenney for employing Ellen DeGeneres at its spokesperson. No one came onboard, and I argued that this was fair-mindedness.

But after hearing what Chick-fil-A CEO Dan Cathy recently had to say, and — more important — after looking a little more closely into just how freely Chick-fil-A mingles its religion with its business, I have changed my mind. I had always thought of Chick-fil-A’s owners as hewing to private principles in nonintrusive ways, namely by closing on Sundays. But those private principles just got a lot more public. In July, Cathy

told Baptist Press that he was “guilty as charged” in supporting “the biblical definition of the family unit.” In the same article, which went viral, he said, “Jesus had a lot of things to say about people who work and live in the business community … Our work should be an act of worship. Our work should be our mission field.”

Opposition to gay

marriage has become a matter of pride for the Georgia-based chain. Worse by far is the support, as IRS forms show, by the WinShape Foundation (Chick-fil-A’s charitable arm) for various anti-gay bodies including Exodus International, whose leaders talked up its gay “cure” in Uganda before the country introduced legislation that threatens gays with deathor imprisonment — although Exodus now says that going to that anti-gay conference was a mistake.

The problem with Chick-fil-A goes beyond LBGT issues. A former worker recently filed a

lawsuitagainst the parent company in which she claims that a franchise owner of a Chick-fil-A inGeorgia fired her so she could be a stay-at-home mom. The corporate culture embraces an overt religiosity, from prayer meetings at business retreats to asking people who apply for an operator license to disclose their marital status and number of dependents.

I respect Chick-fil-A’s owners for taking a love-it-or-leave-it stance in regard to their religion; and, like a lot of people, I am choosing to leave it.

http://ideas.time.co...hanged-my-mind/

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Their entitled to their beliefs I guess (but of course the support of a group that supports "Kill the Gays" is taking it much too far).

However, proclaiming it out for the world to hear, when it is obvious there will be severe repercussions is terribly stupid from a business standpoint.

Enjoy the serious hit your business will take Cathy, I hope it was worth it for you.

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Their entitled to their beliefs I guess (but of course the support of a group that supports "Kill the Gays" is taking it much too far).

However, proclaiming it out for the world to hear, when it is obvious there will be severe repercussions is terribly stupid from a business standpoint.

Enjoy the serious hit your business will take Cathy, I hope it was worth it for you.

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Some readers asked, "Did Chick-fil-A really spend millions lobbying Congress not to condemn Uganda’s 'Kill the Gays' bill"? We found no evidence that Chick-fil-A itself spent money (let alone millions) lobbying Congress to prevent that body from issuing a condemnation of a controversial Ugandan legislative bill which carried the death penalty for some homosexual acts. Some sources reported that the Family Research Council (FRC), one of the organizations to which Chick-fil-A donates through its WinShape corporate charity foundation, filed a report stating that it had spent $25,000 lobbying Congress against H.R. 1064, a resolution seeking to "express the sense of the House of Representatives" that Uganda's proposed Anti-Homosexuality Bill "threatens the protection of fundamental human rights." However, the FRC said that although they did perform lobbying activities regarding H.R. 1064, they did not support the Uganda bill or the death penalty for homosexuality, and their lobbying efforts were not aimed at killing the Congressional resolution but rather at changing its language "to remove sweeping and inaccurate assertions that homosexual conduct is internationally recognized as a fundamental human right."

http://www.snopes.com/politics/sexuality/chickfila.asp

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This is a matter of free speech. The owners of the restaurant can say anything they want and donate to anyone they want as long as they violate no laws. If gay people feel so strong about the restaurant they should boycott it. The say way the Million Moms wanted a boycott of JC Penney.

If the restaurant deny service to gay people or refuse to hire gay people, they should be charged with human rights violations. But that has not occurred.

So far the owner says he believes in traditional marriage between a man and a woman and has donated to an anti-gay organization. That is not a crime.

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30 or 40 years ago, this would have made sense, but nowadays trying to exclusively maintain a far right customer base won't get a business very far.

I would imagine there will be a lot more people boycotting the restaurant, then flocking in because they share the same political/religious beliefs.

Cathy has just dug his business into a deep hole that it may never get out of.

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Some readers asked, "Did Chick-fil-A really spend millions lobbying Congress not to condemn Uganda’s 'Kill the Gays' bill"? We found no evidence that Chick-fil-A itself spent money (let alone millions) lobbying Congress to prevent that body from issuing a condemnation of a controversial Ugandan legislative bill which carried the death penalty for some homosexual acts. Some sources reported that the Family Research Council (FRC), one of the organizations to which Chick-fil-A donates through its WinShape corporate charity foundation, filed a report stating that it had spent $25,000 lobbying Congress against H.R. 1064, a resolution seeking to "express the sense of the House of Representatives" that Uganda's proposed Anti-Homosexuality Bill "threatens the protection of fundamental human rights." However, the FRC said that although they did perform lobbying activities regarding H.R. 1064, they did not support the Uganda bill or the death penalty for homosexuality, and their lobbying efforts were not aimed at killing the Congressional resolution but rather at changing its language "to remove sweeping and inaccurate assertions that homosexual conduct is internationally recognized as a fundamental human right."

http://www.snopes.co...y/chickfila.asp

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