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SFU/BCIT: Computing Science


RyanKeslord17

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Hey guys. So I'm going into grade 12 next year and I am really interested in these two universities. I just wanted your opinion on which university is better for Computer Science. I've also noticed that BCIT's program is only 2 years, while SFU's is 4. Any difference in the two degree's? Also, what is the minimum average to get into the Science department in BCIT and SFU? WhIch courses do universities look at the most? Is it mostly the 2 sciences, a math and an English?

Thanks for your help, all suggestions/advice is welcome.

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Hey guys. So I'm going into grade 12 next year and I am really interested in these two universities. I just wanted your opinion on which university is better for Computer Science. I've also noticed that BCIT's program is only 2 years, while SFU's is 4. Any difference in the two degree's? Also, what is the minimum average to get into the Science department in BCIT and SFU? WhIch courses do universities look at the most? Is it mostly the 2 sciences, a math and an English?

Thanks for your help, all suggestions/advice is welcome.

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As a former sfu computer science major who is now in economics, I may be able to help you out.

.It is kind of difficult to say which is better, but in terms of education it is probably the same. You're not going to learn more at UBC than at SFU. Both schools know what you need to know in order to become an effective programmer. In terms of school prestige however, UBC gets the edge. People seem to assume UBC is better for that reason, but it really just means that it's an older school that has gotten more government funding over the yrs.

- The thing about the BCIT program is that you're not actually getting a degree which is what I assume you're aiming for. You get a diploma which is not a bad thing, but generally a degree gives you a better chance at landing a job. Also from what I've heard, the BCIT program is more hands on; whereas, the SFU program (which I can vouch for) is more theory based. You can always do the BCIT program and then complete your degree at a university if you want to go that route

-I think the minimum average was 80% to get into comp. sci when I got in. Here's an idea of what you can expect: http://students.sfu....n-averages.html

I was not really concerned with that because I was an honours student. You should go to the website or talk to an academic advisor if you're concerned about high school averages.

My advice to you, is to look hard at comp.sci and make sure it's REALLY what you want to do. If you're like me and never programmed in your life beforehand and are just going into it for the hell of it, then I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but you're really going to struggle in comp.sci. Remember, in university your no longer a school boy foolin around in class with friends. You are in competition with the THOUSANDS of other students all fighting for similar jobs. Most people in comp.sci have programmed before so keep this in mind. But again I don't know you and maybe you're an already decent programmer in which case you might thrive in it. Part of the reason why I wanted out of comp.sci was because I realized early that I couldn't compete with these kids who live and breathe next to their laptops. Also, they just weren't the kinds of people I personally get along with. They're nice guys (and I say guys because there's maybe one girl for every 40 dudes), but that's just not who I am. If you like magic the gathering, then you might love comp. sci because all of them play ALL THE TIME.

In terms of the school itself (SFU) I have to tell you, it really wasn't what I expected. I was hoping university was going to be somewhat fun, but my hopes shattered quickly. It's just very depressing. But hey maybe all universities are depressing. I can't really say cause I have nothing to compare SFU to.

My final advice to you would be to just apply everywhere and make your final decision in august. It's a tough decision to make so just keep your options open. And if you realize you don't like a school quickly then transfer asap! Once you reach a certain amount of credits, universities no longer care about your good high school marks, its all about the university marks which could end up biting you in the a$$.

edit:

If you got to SFU here are some comp.sci teachers I recommend you avoid if you can:

- Anne Laverne (cmpt 125)

- Brad Bart (cmpt 120)

- Jonathan Jedwab (macm 201)

Here are some teachers I recommend:

- Colin Stewart (cmpt 165)

- Chris Kellman (buec 232) This is not a comp.sci course but you have to take it. Probably the best prof I've had. Just look at his ratings:

http://www.ratemyprofessors.com/ShowRatings.jsp?tid=1599118&page=2

-Anthony dixon (cmpt 150)

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Thanks a lot for your reply, very thorough response. While I'm sure I would have no problem getting into SFU, I'm a little apprehensive that it's going to be more theory oriented and i won't get much exposure to actually doing what I have learned. That's why I'm leaning towards BCIT.

My only worry is that I might find it difficult to get a job after without a degree (correct me I'm wrong about that). I'm really keen on joining the co-op program as well. Did you do that in SFU? How was it? Does BCIT have a good co-op program?

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  • 2 months later...

Bump, I have a question. On this link:

http://students.sfu.ca/admission/requirements/admission-averages.html

it says the average for applied sciences, which is what I'm trying to get into, is 84%. What does this mean? Is it that if I get anything lower, say 82-83 they won't even look at? Or is that just an average of the percentages that got accepted into the program? Thanks.

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Bump, I have a question. On this link:

http://students.sfu....n-averages.html

it says the average for applied sciences, which is what I'm trying to get into, is 84%. What does this mean? Is it that if I get anything lower, say 82-83 they won't even look at? Or is that just an average of the percentages that got accepted into the program? Thanks.

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Bump, I have a question. On this link:

http://students.sfu....n-averages.html

it says the average for applied sciences, which is what I'm trying to get into, is 84%. What does this mean? Is it that if I get anything lower, say 82-83 they won't even look at? Or is that just an average of the percentages that got accepted into the program? Thanks.

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SFU is really depressing during fall and winter months. Its always foggy up there and the AQ building is a depressing grey slab of concrete that resembles a prison. Although I would say that SFU has a top notch Co-op program and you can get all your hands-on experience from the Co-op program.

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It probably depends on what type of programming you want to do. Some more formal places might care a lot, but its never really been a consideration in my field. I'll hire the guy who seems like the best fit and seems competent as a programmer, regardless of his education. Self taught? great, as long as you know what you need to know. Although a person with no experience and no degree will have to show what exactly he's done (working demos, independant app sales etc). Certainly once you have been working no one I know cares how you learned.

What type of programming do you want to do?

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I would imagine the CST program at BCIT is much more hands on (I actually don't take that program, but it is definitely something I was considering.) I have done a lot of computer programming before, and overhearing what people say at the ehhpod etc, they seem to be learning the proper stuff.

In my program (Bs of electrical engineering) it is quite practical in contrast to the UBC equivilent. I.e, you don't really get into many UBC labs even after the first or second term, or so I hear. At BCIT you do a lab for EVERYTHING. Drawing digital schematics will become second nature, lol.

That said, I ride the bus with some employed CST students that found jobs near BCIT.

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