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PQ in Quebec Proposes Secular Charter - No Turbans, Hijabs For Civil Servants


DonLever

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This would be nice, if it wasn't a complete farce of a charter that essentially puts one religion ahead of others.

I may not like any religions, but I respect the Charter of Right and Freedoms that directs all people be free to practice their religion.

Bah humbug.

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Which doesn't make sense because there's the Charter of Rights and Freedoms that guarantees freedom of religion and freedom of expression. It doesn't seem like a turban will interfere with an office worker, so why ban it?

Also, why the hell does QC think it can set up its own provincial "charter" that can override a federal one?

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Which doesn't make sense because there's the Charter of Rights and Freedoms that guarantees freedom of religion and freedom of expression. It doesn't seem like a turban will interfere with an office worker, so why ban it?

Also, why the hell does QC think it can set up its own provincial "charter" that can override a federal one?

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Why yes I do believe Jesus was real and that he was crucified .. I believe he was a "prophet" but no more a "son of God" than any other human being .. just to clarify .. I also believe that if "Christians" followed the teachings and example of Jesus, the world would be a lot better place .. the real teachings, not the twisted self-serving credo's that most religions have applied through "interpretation" and "translation"

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Quebec has hated the Charter from the moment of inception. The story goes like this...

On November 4th 1981, Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, then Minister of Justice Jean Chretien, and all the provincial Premiers met at a hotel in Ottawa for a First Ministers' Conference discussing the patriation of the Canadian Constitution. The PQ leader, and premier of Quebec at the time was Rene Levesque, who was pushing for an Opt-Out clause in favour of Quebec. The negotiations for the day concluded with the promise that discussions would continue in the morning.That night, Levesque decided to stay at a hotel in nearby Hull, Quebec. His reasoning in staying at a different hotel from the venue of the conference was because he wanted to sleep in Quebec rather than in Ontario. Much to his chagrin, Chretien, Trudeau, and the premiers from Saskatchewan, PEI, Newfoundland and Nova Scotia met at the kitchen of the hotel venue. It was in that kitchen that the parties agreed on the Charter of Rights and Freedoms while Levesque was snoring in his bed. This was henceforth known as the "Kitchen Accord" or as "The night of the long knives" in Quebec.

The next morning, Levesque was understandably livid to find out that an agreement was already in place, and that it was reached without his consent. He promptly walked out of the negotiations and Quebec has viewed the Charter as an affront to its honour ever since. From its implementation in 1982, to when the PQ lost power in 1985, Section 33 of the Charter, otherwise known as the notwithstanding clause, was invoked on every piece of Quebec legislation in clear defiance against the Charter and "English Canada".

The irony of the situation is that by invoking the notwithstanding clause even once (let alone numerous times), Quebec had impliedly and perhaps inadvertedly consented to its validity.

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