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Why Splitting the Sedins Works and our Chemistry


DownUndaCanuck

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That's two comeback wins in a row against poor defensive teams when Tortorella decides to split the Sedins. Sure they've got great chemistry with each other, but when separated they light up other lines. The biggest reason for this is because how both of them have changed their style of play over the last 3 years, and this involves how Burrows and Kesler have changed as well.

In 2011, everyone remembers well that Daniel Sedin was the sniper on our top line (41 goals), while Henrik was the designated playmaker and Burrows the gritty net presence. This is, quite frankly, the recipe for success on every single top line in the NHL (playmaker, shooter, grinder). Whoever plays on a line, for there to be success these roles need to be filled. Now our 2nd line was very successful too in 2011, with Kesler as the shooter (41G), Raymond as the playmaker and Samuelsson the net presence (a very skilled grinder compared to others).

The last 2 seasons however, players roles have changed. Daniel has become much more of a passer than a shooter, with his shot totals and goals going down over the last 3 seasons and he's noticeably passing off more. As for Burrows, he too has been getting stuck in the Sedin cycles and making pretty plays, but not getting and planting himself in front of the net the way a grinder on their line should. For that reason, we've got 3 playmakers on our top line - the single biggest reason they were handled the last 2 playoff rounds and were ice cold down the stretch. Three playmakers with no shooter or guy in front of the net is very easy to handle. As for our second line, Kesler remains the shooter but now has Booth with him who is also a shooter, and Higgins who is a grinder, leaving no one to set any of them up which has been the biggest reason they generate no offence.

Full credit to Tortorella for realizing something in 5 games that AV hadn't over 2 years. He's putting playmakers with snipers and grinders to get us back to that winning chemistry lineup. Of course it also helps that he has left and right handed players playing with each other (particularly playmaker and shooter).

With this logic, here's an ideal healthy lineup we could and should see iced:

Hansen (RH, grinder) - H. Sedin (LH, playmaker) - Santorelli (RH, shooter)

D. Sedin (LH, playmaker) - Kesler (RH, shooter) - Higgins (LH, grinder)

Booth (LH, shooter) - Richardson (LH, grinder) - Burrows (LH, playmaker)

Jensen (LH, shooter) - Schroeder (RH, playmaker) - Kassian (RH, grinder)

Obviously all the playmakers/grinders/shooters are interchangeable with each other to maintain the chemistry. However, players change all the time so there's no reason Daniel can't revert back to his goal scoring ways, or Kesler to his playmaking self (had 50 assists not long ago).

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I think the lines should be this when everyone is healthy and if Kass is playing consistently.

Higgins-Sedin-Burrows

Sedin-Kesler-Kassian

Booth-Schroeder-Hansen

Richardson-Santorelli-Weise

Burr and Henrik have chemistry and Higgins worked well last game with Hank.

Kesler gets two playmakers on his wings now. Hopefully Danny starts scoring more goals though.

Fast gritty 3rd line that can also provide offense

a 4th line that can play a lot of minutes.

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I don't think Daniel's shot totals have declined as blatantly as you suggest OP. In fact, #22's shot totals have been pretty consistent over the past three years, even for last shortened season perhaps, which as a bit of anomaly, saw Daniel take 20 shots less than the previous season. This basically means that Daniel would take one less shot over a period of every four games. If we applied the same to Burr, his shot totals actually went up by 41 shots...

My take is different. Plain and simple, Daniel is still the sniper and he is probably the purest goal scorer we have on the team at this point. At the same time, he is also probably the second best passer on the team as well. This is why splitting the Sedins can actually make this team stronger by balancing the offense and adding strength throughout the top-6, especially with the current makeup of the team.

Here's the problem: The Canucks have a lot of players who are dynamic and can do many things very well (Burrows, Hansen, Higgins, Kesler and maybe one day soon Kassian), these are players that coaches salivate over! However; when we look at how many pure scorers (or pure offensive threats), we have only two - the Sedins.

Right now with the makeup of this team and player levels, when the Sedins play together, we have a first line and then two solid third lines as well as a 4th. Now I personally do not feel the team's 4th line is as bad as some do (especially with Schreyds in the lineup) but for sure the 4th line aint gonna hurt the other team on the scoreboard. And even if Kesler plays like his 40-goal self, having wingers like Higgins and Hansen in the top-6, as valuable as they are to the team overall, is all the more reason to distribute the offense.

The opposing coaches know that you shut down the Sedins, your chances of winning go up exponentially because there is no other true offensive threat coming up right behind the Sedins. This is also why the Sedins will still play hard, chip away and get their points but the team overall will struggle to score goals. Kesler may or may not be able to kill you by himself and even if he does he can't do it forever. I also believe this is partly why the team struggles in the post-season.

By splitting the Sedins, the team now has pure offensive threats on each of the top-2 lines who can both make plays and create offense. This also makes things much tougher for the opposing coach and defense. Instead of going up against a #1 or #2 D-man on any given team, which surely will be the case every shift or as much as the opposing coach can match when the twins play together, but when split, one of Daniel or Henrik might find themselves up against a #3 or #4 D-man on a regular basis.

In my opinion, this team sorely needs help up front. In the meanwhile, props to Torts for finding ways to make the lineup more effective and win games. It's fun to watch.

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I don't think Daniel's shot totals have declined as blatantly as you suggest OP. In fact, #22's shot totals have been pretty consistent over the past three years, even for last shortened season perhaps, which as a bit of anomaly, saw Daniel take 20 shots less than the previous season. This basically means that Daniel would take one less shot over a period of every four games. If we applied the same to Burr, his shot totals actually went up by 41 shots...

My take is different. Plain and simple, Daniel is still the sniper and he is probably the purest goal scorer we have on the team at this point. At the same time, he is also probably the second best passer on the team as well. This is why splitting the Sedins can actually make this team stronger by balancing the offense and adding strength throughout the top-6, especially with the current makeup of the team.

Here's the problem: The Canucks have a lot of players who are dynamic and can do many things very well (Burrows, Hansen, Higgins, Kesler and maybe one day soon Kassian), these are players that coaches salivate over! However; when we look at how many pure scorers (or pure offensive threats), we have only two - the Sedins.

Right now with the makeup of this team and player levels, when the Sedins play together, we have a first line and then two solid third lines as well as a 4th. Now I personally do not feel the team's 4th line is as bad as some do (especially with Schreyds in the lineup) but for sure the 4th line aint gonna hurt the other team on the scoreboard. And even if Kesler plays like his 40-goal self, having wingers like Higgins and Hansen in the top-6, as valuable as they are to the team overall, is all the more reason to distribute the offense.

The opposing coaches know that you shut down the Sedins, your chances of winning go up exponentially because there is no other true offensive threat coming up right behind the Sedins. This is also why the Sedins will still play hard, chip away and get their points but the team overall will struggle to score goals. Kesler may or may not be able to kill you by himself and even if he does he can't do it forever. I also believe this is partly why the team struggles in the post-season.

By splitting the Sedins, the team now has pure offensive threats on each of the top-2 lines who can both make plays and create offense. This also makes things much tougher for the opposing coach and defense. Instead of going up against a #1 or #2 D-man on any given team, which surely will be the case every shift or as much as the opposing coach can match when the twins play together, but when split, one of Daniel or Henrik might find themselves up against a #3 or #4 D-man on a regular basis.

In my opinion, this team sorely needs help up front. In the meanwhile, props to Torts for finding ways to make the lineup more effective and win games. It's fun to watch.

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i agree with some of what you said but how you are ranking the caliber of some of our players is a bit off base

Sedins = 1st liners, we agree

Kesler = highend 2nd liner

Burrows, Booth also 2nd liners

Kassian 3-2 liner still developing, we almost agree

Santorelli HIGHEND 3rd liner maybe 2nd liner we will she how the year goes

higgins hansen great 3rd liners, we agree

schroeder id like to move doesnt fit us with the youth thats coming.

our 4th line needs a higher level of talent richardson will do for now but he needs some help on the flanks

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This thread is more about the overall chemistry of each line, not just the Sedins. It's about how playmakers, grinders and shooters work better together, not just the fact that we've split up our two best players. Try reading the OP before shooting it down.

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I read to the part where it said Raymond was the playmaker. Not quite. Raymond was more of a grinder, but in reality, Samuelsson was a good grinder AND playmaker. When he had that career year, he was really something else.

I finish reading it now lol

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