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Joker Division- 1st round matchups(Part 1 of 2)


gmen81

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Sideshow Bob episodes of The Simpsons are the worst.

Anton Chigurh is an amazing villain from literally one of the best movies in decades, written by literally the best author alive. What the hell is wrong with you people.

I don't get the over the top Chigurh love most people seem to have. Bardem did a decent job in a Terminator-style villain role, but there's not a ton of depth there.

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I don't get the over the top Chigurh love most people seem to have. Bardem did a decent job in a Terminator-style villain role, but there's not a ton of depth there.

It's a great movie made by one of the best directors around, based on one of the best books by (arguably) the greatest author alive. I don't think there's any reason to question why the main antagonist is so popular.

I sort of agree that he doesn't have much depth, but if I needed screeching about nihilism and good vs. evil, I'd be spilling all my votes on comic book heroes and villains. Chigurh's subtle-yet-menacing attitude and actions are, IMO, totally boosted by his setting, the story, and his infrequent but great dialogue. I, personally, believe his little coin speech suggests there's a lot more to the character than we see. But unlike (for example) the Joker, it's not shoved in our faces constantly. Most of Chigurh's depth (if there is any) is left to the imagination or given only through implication. Not many villains do that well, really.

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It's a great movie made by one of the best directors around, based on one of the best books by (arguably) the greatest author alive. I don't think there's any reason to question why the main antagonist is so popular.

I sort of agree that he doesn't have much depth, but if I needed screeching about nihilism and good vs. evil, I'd be spilling all my votes on comic book heroes and villains. Chigurh's subtle-yet-menacing attitude and actions are, IMO, totally boosted by his setting, the story, and his infrequent but great dialogue. I, personally, believe his little coin speech suggests there's a lot more to the character than we see. But unlike (for example) the Joker, it's not shoved in our faces constantly. Most of Chigurh's depth (if there is any) is left to the imagination or given only through implication. Not many villains do that well, really.

I haven't read the book, so I can't speak to it, but I was kind of disappointed by No Country after hearing all about how it was the best movie of the decade and how Anton Chigurh was the best villain of all time. Not that it was a bad movie by any means, but I didn't get the hype.

There's plenty of space between the extremes of a villain with ham-fisted exposition and the blank slate type meant as an embodiment of something more primal. I think the latter works a lot better in movies like the aforementioned Terminator or Alien, where the villain becomes part of an oppressive atmosphere. I didn't really get that feel from No Country in a way that would push Chigurh into the realm of excellence.

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I haven't read the book, so I can't speak to it, but I was kind of disappointed by No Country after hearing all about how it was the best movie of the decade and how Anton Chigurh was the best villain of all time. Not that it was a bad movie by any means, but I didn't get the hype.

There's plenty of space between the extremes of a villain with ham-fisted exposition and the blank slate type meant as an embodiment of something more primal. I think the latter works a lot better in movies like the aforementioned Terminator or Alien, where the villain becomes part of an oppressive atmosphere. I didn't really get that feel from No Country in a way that would push Chigurh into the realm of excellence.

Well I certainly wouldn't say he's the best, that's for sure.

I'm kind of surprised you don't think Chigurh is an example of the latter (as you listed). I think No Country is set in an extremely hostile and oppressive atmosphere, it's just a very Earth-y one. The terrain is brutal and inhospitable (look at how the people live), and almost everyone is a villain. Even the animals are killed or try to kill. There is minimal morality, even among the "good" guys. To me, the movie IS almost entirely nihilistic, it just doesn't declare it, really. We just sort of know.

I agree about the Alien comment. But I kind of-sort of think No Country is just a non-sci fi version of the same sort of deal. Chigurh is just a face applied to the bizarre nihilism that exists in border towns.

EDIT: well maybe you do think he is an example of the latter, but I am surprised you don't think it "works" as well, or whatever

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Well I certainly wouldn't say he's the best, that's for sure.

I'm kind of surprised you don't think Chigurh is an example of the latter (as you listed). I think No Country is set in an extremely hostile and oppressive atmosphere, it's just a very Earth-y one. The terrain is brutal and inhospitable (look at how the people live), and almost everyone is a villain. Even the animals are killed or try to kill. There is minimal morality, even among the "good" guys. To me, the movie IS almost entirely nihilistic, it just doesn't declare it, really. We just sort of know.

I agree about the Alien comment. But I kind of-sort of think No Country is just a non-sci fi version of the same sort of deal. Chigurh is just a face applied to the bizarre nihilism that exists in border towns.

EDIT: well maybe you do think he is an example of the latter, but I am surprised you don't think it "works" as well, or whatever

I do think he's an example of the latter and it's not like he was a bad villain. I just think that for a primal antagonist with little exposition like Chigurh to be more than just "good", the atmosphere has to be overpowering. I found myself a lot more interested in Brolin's character than Chigurh in No Country. The movie certainly had plenty of moments of opressiveness, but it wasn't consistent in that respect. Not jarring tone shifts, but plenty of more upbeat and darkly humorous sections. I think that can take away from a blank slate villain, while a more complex one is less reliant on atmosphere. Alien is probably the best example I can think of. The xenomorph is well-crafted visually, but it's absolutely nothing without the setting and feel of the movie (as later sequels demonstrate perfectly).

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