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B.C. must pay $2M to teachers over class-size court battle


Heretic

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If I had my way? Mostly a complete overhaul of the system with a vast decrease in bureaucracy and waste.

Or you could set up a web site with some basic formulasto do all that calculating for you... Teachers log on and input school ID's they're willing to work at and website does the rest of the work.

Cha-ching money for students!

Right....and how do the teachers on call know if a position is available?

The web site going to call everyone on the list every day?

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Cut Government? Stop wasting money on lawyers?

Commercialize schools to generate revenue?

I never said I have the answers, all I said was the Government was responsible for all the cuts to the K-12 education system the past 12 years which has resulted low scores by graduates on federal exams compared to other provinces.

In BC at least education funding has been increasing despite lower overall student population. Not sure where the idea of cuts comes from.

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With 5 million or so students compared with 15000 inmates of the long term variety it's unlikely that increasing education funding would result in enough of a reduction in crime rates to actually save us money. Even if we magically ended the prison population and put all that money into education it would only be like a 1% increase in per student funding.

Now if we taught math and research in schools that might be more obvious.

Maybe if we spent more money on math programs and had smaller class sizes so the teachers could spend more time with each student.

Oh wait. You don't want that.

Boom!

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Submit a list of schools you are will in to T.O.C. at. Obviously the more schools you are willing to commute to the greater the odds of getting work.

so if I live in an area with a much smaller school, or schools, I'm SOL if no teachers are sick?

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Maybe if we spent more money on math programs and had smaller class sizes so the teachers could spend more time with each student.

Oh wait. You don't want that.

Boom!

Not enough math teachers anyways. You can raise my taxes to get more math teachers no problem.

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In BC at least education funding has been increasing despite lower overall student population. Not sure where the idea of cuts comes from.

BC falls further and further behind other provinces in a whole range of indicators. Statistics

Canada data shows that all provinces experienced declining enrolment between 2005–06 and

2009–10, except Alberta. Six provinces experienced a greater percentage decrease in student

enrolment than BC. Yet over the same period most other provinces hired more educators to

support students. Between 2005–06 and 2009–10, the number of FTE educators increased by

5% in Canada and decreased by 2% in BC (see Appendix 2). To see the grim realities, take a

look at where BC stands in comparison to other provinces in improvements to their education

budgets (Table 1).

Table 1: BC’s rank among provinces—Percentage change

in education funding: Statistics Canada indicators, 2005–06 to 2009–10

Percentage change in funding for elementary and

secondary schools between 2005–06 and 2009–10

Type of funding

BC’s rank among provinces:

Percent increase in funding

(1st=highest & 10th=lowest)

Operating expenditures (in current dollars) 10th

Total expenditures (in current dollars) 10th

Total expenditures per student (in current dollars) 10th

Total expenditures per student (in 2002 constant dollars) 10th

Total expenditures per capita (in current dollars) 10th

Total expenditures per capita (in 2002 constant dollars) 10th

Total expenditures as a percentage of GDP 9th

Total expenditures per student as a percentage of GDP per capita 8th

Source: BCTF Research table with information from Statistics Canada (2011). Summary Public School Indicators

for Canada, the Provinces and Territories, 2005/2006 to 2009/2010, Charts A.17.2, A.19.2, A.20.1.2, A.20.2.2,

A.26.1.2, A.26.2.2, A31.2, A.32.2.

Compared to other provinces, BC provided the lowest percentage increase in education funding

for six key indicators used by Statistics Canada to measure public school expenditures. (For

more information on education spending as a percentage of GDP, see Appendix 3.) Given the

freeze on K to 12 education funding announced in Budget 2012, the situation in BC schools will

only worsen unless there is a significant change in policy direction.

Other provinces have been improving K to 12 funding at a greater rate than BC. Percentage

increases in the funding for education in BC have not kept up. It is time to make a change.

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In BC at least education funding has been increasing despite lower overall student population. Not sure where the idea of cuts comes from.

I can assure you it's not going to the classrooms..........considering I share 23 science 7 textbooks between 70+ students

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so if I live in an area with a much smaller school, or schools, I'm SOL if no teachers are sick?

How is that different from right now? I would think there would be more flexibility if individual teachers decided where it was they are willing to work and depending won where that was the odds would of course be much different.

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BC falls further and further behind other provinces in a whole range of indicators. Statistics

Canada data shows that all provinces experienced declining enrolment between 2005–06 and

2009–10, except Alberta. Six provinces experienced a greater percentage decrease in student

enrolment than BC. Yet over the same period most other provinces hired more educators to

support students. Between 2005–06 and 2009–10, the number of FTE educators increased by

5% in Canada and decreased by 2% in BC (see Appendix 2). To see the grim realities, take a

look at where BC stands in comparison to other provinces in improvements to their education

budgets (Table 1).

Table 1: BC’s rank among provinces—Percentage change

in education funding: Statistics Canada indicators, 2005–06 to 2009–10

Percentage change in funding for elementary and

secondary schools between 2005–06 and 2009–10

Type of funding

BC’s rank among provinces:

Percent increase in funding

(1st=highest & 10th=lowest)

Operating expenditures (in current dollars) 10th

Total expenditures (in current dollars) 10th

Total expenditures per student (in current dollars) 10th

Total expenditures per student (in 2002 constant dollars) 10th

Total expenditures per capita (in current dollars) 10th

Total expenditures per capita (in 2002 constant dollars) 10th

Total expenditures as a percentage of GDP 9th

Total expenditures per student as a percentage of GDP per capita 8th

Source: BCTF Research table with information from Statistics Canada (2011). Summary Public School Indicators

for Canada, the Provinces and Territories, 2005/2006 to 2009/2010, Charts A.17.2, A.19.2, A.20.1.2, A.20.2.2,

A.26.1.2, A.26.2.2, A31.2, A.32.2.

Compared to other provinces, BC provided the lowest percentage increase in education funding

for six key indicators used by Statistics Canada to measure public school expenditures. (For

more information on education spending as a percentage of GDP, see Appendix 3.) Given the

freeze on K to 12 education funding announced in Budget 2012, the situation in BC schools will

only worsen unless there is a significant change in policy direction.

Other provinces have been improving K to 12 funding at a greater rate than BC. Percentage

increases in the funding for education in BC have not kept up. It is time to make a change.

So our spending is less out of control then other provinces. That everyone else is increasing budgets despite declining enrollment is not something to be ashamed of.

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How is that different from right now? I would think there would be more flexibility if individual teachers decided where it was they are willing to work and depending won where that was the odds would of course be much different.

because every school is a close enough drive to allow time to get a call, get ready, and get to the school at a reasonable time. TOC's do actually teach, which means they have to have time to rep for the days work. Meaning they need to be at school by 8am. That said, I do agree there is probably a way to make it work.

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You would be surprised what websites can do these days.

And that website is going to know which teacher the principal knows fits in better when comparing 15 teachers with the same credentials.

That website will know which teacher the kids prefer, which one the parents prefer.

That website will know which teacher is best for the students - because that website understand the emotional side of things.

Sounds like the Obamacare website - and we know how well that is working.

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I can assure you it's not going to the classrooms..........considering I share 23 science 7 textbooks between 70+ students

You should be cheering ideas aimed at lowering overhead and admin costs then one would think......

Getting school boards reduced to say the regional district level would kill 80% of the school districts with a massive savings in overhead. Teachers are the only union I know of that resists the idea of firing their managers in order to increase their pay!

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How is that different from right now? I would think there would be more flexibility if individual teachers decided where it was they are willing to work and depending won where that was the odds would of course be much different.

Not to mention if they did the other restructuring I mentioned with getting rid of bad and "retired" teachers, more of those young teachers stuck constantly doing (more often hoping for) TOC jobs would actually have a real, full time position.

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So our spending is less out of control then other provinces. That everyone else is increasing budgets despite declining enrollment is not something to be ashamed of.

It wouldn't if our students were ranked 1st or 2nd instead of last in provincial exams.

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