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Help With a Decision


RyanKeslord17

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Hey guys, so let me set the stage for you. Straight out of High School, I joined KPU's information technology bachelor degree program. I thought it was going well, was understanding everything and my grades were good too (above 3.0 GPA). Before KPU, I had my eyes set on BCIT, which is a 2 year computer systems tech program.

What happened was that I got in the January intake at BCIT, so I decided to jump ship, and accept the BCIT offer and leave Kwantlen. First month was awesome, then gradually, it became more and more busy. It's like trying to learn triple the information compared to Kwantlen at the same time. I find myself always behind, and trying to self learn everything. It might be possible to get by now, which I am with 60-70 in each class, but I don't think it will be possible down the road.

My question to you guys is what should I do in this situation? I still want to pursue computers, but I think I'm not learning as I should be, and that KPU was much better for me in terms of learning and moving forward at your own pace. Yes, I should've known this before taking the offer bcit lol.

Would you go back to Kwantlen? If so, are these BCIT courses transferable? I will try and get in touch with KPU to ask them, but it takes like 2 hours to get a representative lol.

Or would you just stick it out, squeeze by and then start looking for a job?

I'm open to any ideas, and won't mind any suggestions.

Thanks.

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I'd stick it out, but you sound like you wanna go back.

Personally I didn't enjoy my program or have any special attachment to the field, but at the end of the day for me it was get in, get out and get a job. Wasn't so eager to get up in the morning, but you learn to live with it.

Here I am, in my office, on CDC. Can't say I regret it.

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I'd say stick it out, but BCIT is already a condensed schedule for the most part and the January intake is even more so to get those students caught up for the second year. If you can't handle the workload then I'd suggest a more gradual program like you had a Kwantlen.

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Tough it out. I went to KPU and regretted it. The program at BCIT is much better. You'll be better prepped for a job and they do a few extra things to help you out in that regard. It's a ton of work because of the condensed schedule, but totally worth it.

Put your head down and get the work done. You save two years in the end anyway.

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I slacked off for the first year of university, literally did nothing and just expected to be able to put in a 'high-school' effort and come out like roses. Did not happen. In my second year, I really gave it my best effort. II was hardly social and instead dedicated myself to school. My final grades for my second year? Not all that much better from my first year. A bit better, but certainly nothing to be proud of. Certainly not reflective of the effort I felt that I put in.

I continued to work hard for my third and fourth year and averaged a 4.0/4.33. It takes time to learn how to learn. Figuring out what is expected of you, how you need to think, how you need to study are things that take time to establish.

Do not give up. Just understand that things take time. Even when you put in the effort, you may not see immediate results. Keep at it. BCIT is a better school than Kwantlen.

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Guest Gumballthechewy

I'd stick it out, but you sound like you wanna go back.

Personally I didn't enjoy my program or have any special attachment to the field, but at the end of the day for me it was get in, get out and get a job. Wasn't so eager to get up in the morning, but you learn to live with it.

Here I am, in my office, on CDC. Can't say I regret it.

Livin' the dream! :P

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I'd stick it out, but you sound like you wanna go back.

Personally I didn't enjoy my program or have any special attachment to the field, but at the end of the day for me it was get in, get out and get a job. Wasn't so eager to get up in the morning, but you learn to live with it.

Here I am, in my office, on CDC. Can't say I regret it.

Not only that, but as someone who works in management, the value of a degree isn't merely the major itself. While you can train someone on knowledge, or knowledge can be proven in other ways while job hunting, the intangible of the degree is the ability to finish what you start, which is an important asset for any company. When I worked for Google I knew guys with English degrees doing frontpage.

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Not only that, but as someone who works in management, the value of a degree isn't merely the major itself. While you can train someone on knowledge, or knowledge can be proven in other ways while job hunting, the intangible of the degree is the ability to finish what you start, which is an important asset for any company. When I worked for Google I knew guys with English degrees doing frontpage.

This.

In the government, most of the upper management jobs are only available to people with a degree. Thing is, it doesn't matter what the degree is in - just that they have it. And 95% of the time their grades don't make a difference.

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On that note, how about just forging a degree and go with that?

If you're rich, it's called going to an Ivy League school. Just sit through classes, go to frat parties, fuck off, and get your piece of paper when your time is over, then enjoy making millions on someone writing books in your name, or spending all your time as a US politician golfing/attending fundraisers, while your staff does all the research and prepares your speeches. Or get an executive position with a notable corporation/bank, drive them into the ground with willful incompetence, then sit back and watch Uncle Sam equip you with a golden parachute and bailout package.

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This.

In the government, most of the upper management jobs are only available to people with a degree. Thing is, it doesn't matter what the degree is in - just that they have it. And 95% of the time their grades don't make a difference.

My brother has a American History degree and is working for the minister of Finance in Information services licencing. A job generally given to people with law degrees but having a degree in something got him an interview and he made them fall in love with him.

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I'm a little baffled by those with an arts degree who go on to great-paying jobs. I guess great pay is subjective, but I have a BA from UBC and it did very little for me in Vancouver. It seems to me those with a BA who get into good jobs soon/from the get-go either have great work experience or connections or just fib.

When I moved to LA, I was able to double my salary, but I think the same job would probably pay really low in Van.

So, when I move back I'm thinking of getting a more marketable degree in either computer science at UBC or IT at BCIT. I'm leaning towards UBC's CompSci programme, but I'm not sure.

Anyone have any feedback? Or should I start another thread so I own't hijack this one? :D

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I'm a little baffled by those with an arts degree who go on to great-paying jobs. I guess great pay is subjective, but I have a BA from UBC and it did very little for me in Vancouver. It seems to me those with a BA who get into good jobs soon/from the get-go either have great work experience or connections or just fib.

When I moved to LA, I was able to double my salary, but I think the same job would probably pay really low in Van.

So, when I move back I'm thinking of getting a more marketable degree in either computer science at UBC or IT at BCIT. I'm leaning towards UBC's CompSci programme, but I'm not sure.

Anyone have any feedback? Or should I start another thread so I own't hijack this one? :D

You could also do an MBA if you like what you're doing but want more upwards mobility in your career.

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