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4 hours ago, Rob_Zepp said:

LOL, says the guy who created a narrative about a hockey player.

Zepp,  after everything that has been said or done here..

tell me you aren’t happier to have the rights to a young Hockey Player with the potential that Tryamkin brings, over a Coach who was seemingly spinning his wheels. ?

its all history now,.  and I personally look forward to the future this Team has, with a player like Tryamkin on it, than not.

260 - 6’8” with wheels, than can throw a Benn, Jenner, or Brower like a rag doll.. a bit of a gamble, but really a great pick for JB at that point in the draft.

Edited by SilentSam
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“We are disappointed Nikita chose to sign in the KHL, but also recognize from what he told us in our exit meetings that this was a family decision first,” Benning said. “He has a chance to be an impact player in the NHL and we offered him a two-year extension. But for now he is home and we will move ahead with building this team with other young players.”

If his wife was pregnant like alf says, then it may be as simple as him wanting his child to be born in Russia. That's his prerogative. We don't need a villain in this. Let's hope he returns Tryamkinly.

 

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3 minutes ago, RWMc1 said:

“We are disappointed Nikita chose to sign in the KHL, but also recognize from what he told us in our exit meetings that this was a family decision first,” Benning said. “He has a chance to be an impact player in the NHL and we offered him a two-year extension. But for now he is home and we will move ahead with building this team with other young players.”

If his wife was pregnant like alf says, then it may be as simple as him wanting his child to be born in Russia. That's his prerogative. We don't need a villain in this. Let's hope he returns Tryamkinly.

 

I think it was a collection of things. Family obviously being the big one. I think NHL players not allowed in the olympics gave Tryamkin a glimmer of hope in playing for Russia. The Canucks were still on track to be a bottom feeder team so it’s not like he was gonna miss much in Vancouver. I do think he’ll be back in a year or two.

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7 hours ago, Rob_Zepp said:

It is an incredible accomplishment to make it to the NHL but it is also an enormous privilege.   I don't have a lot of time for guys who run away from it and then blame everything but the real reasons.   Sorry, you have your perspective, I have mine.   I don't have to "live with the consequences"....there are no consequences to me other than a few keystrokes about the guy....as far as I am concerned, he is not NHL material until he fixes his priorities and attitude.

 

I totally get if he wanted to leave for family reasons, homesick reasons etc. etc.   Then it was truly a "decision" for his own reasons.   If he truly did leave for all the reasons that the other poster in the tennis match was making, it is truly "man up" and "ran home" as rookie NHL players who don't like their coach or don't think they got enough ice time.....uh, that is about equal to the number of rookie NHL players each and every year.

 

The tone was for the other poster.....as I am not even remotely sure it applies to the kid in question.   IF he really did leave for wanting, as a rookie, to dictate his minutes, question roster moves and refuse to take input on play....then he did "run away" and clearly wasn't (and may never be) ready for the NHL game...and, yes, that would be a "man up" situation.

I have more respect for athletes that achieve the big leagues but are more complete human beings that don’t blindly put the sport in front of family and everything else in life.  

 

Your point of view is quite narrow.

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5 hours ago, SilentSam said:

Zepp,  after everything that has been said or done here..

tell me you aren’t happier to have the rights to a young Hockey Player with the potential that Tryamkin brings, over a Coach who was seemingly spinning his wheels. ?

its all history now,.  and I personally look forward to the future this Team has, with a player like Tryamkin on it, than not.

260 - 6’8” with wheels, than can throw a Benn, Jenner, or Brower like a rag doll.. a bit of a gamble, but really a great pick for JB at that point in the draft.

Ah the straw man argument has surfaced when finally facing reality.

 

This has nothing to do with the coach and everything to do with your obsession with the player, the coach and the player's own immaturity. Lidster was the D coach and as I have said Lidster would ultimately decide TOI, shift changes etc. WD would become involved when he felt that Tryamkin could do more to fulfil his potential and to help the team.

 

It is strange how Hutton, a player who has had his TOI reduced and had to suffer healthy scratches on many an occasion has not had the same type of feverish ranting on his behalf. Is it because Hutton has taken it like a man and realised the coach has only the best intentions at heart for the player? Or is it that Hutton doesn't knock people on their backside and cream them into the boards. I suspect the latter.

 

At the end of the day people like you have to face reality.

 

1. WD believed not in what Tryamkin was but what he could be.

2. Whether WD allocated minutes or Lidster did, it came down to the same thing. Young players had to work for what they got. That is the only way to be fair to the other young players who were prepared to work (Bo, Stetch) to vary their game (Baertschi Gaunce) 

3. If Tryamkin wanted more minutes he needed to firstly realise that the coach runs the team, that he needed to abandon this "victim attitude" and appreciate that none of the coaches were trying to destroy him or ask him to do something he couldn't do, just to do it more consistently. 

4. He was NEVER asked to fight. That is a myth put about by "the butthurt"

5. Physicality is a state of mind, where it is a player's particular attribute, it needs to be deployed from the minute the player steps on the ice until he steps off it. That is what Chara does, Pronger, Byfuglien, Webber, Opik etc.

 

WD was never against young players he was for making them work and improve themselves to justify being in the team. WD was not a great NHL coach (he did however take an ordinary team to 101 points the 5th highest Canucks total in the last 16years) but he did have a great CV and reputation for improving players and bringing out their potential. He understood that few young players, if any get very far in the game unless they understand and carry out their defensive responsibilities. Poor defense not only hurts the team but affects the performance of your team mates. That is why WD was hard on some players and most saw the light and elevated their game on the back of it.

 

 

Edited by alfstonker
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2 hours ago, SID.IS.SID.ME.IS.ME said:

Imagine the KHL was the top league in the world.

 

And let’s say you’re a good Canadian kid from New Westminster. You’re also a hulking physical specimen, play D, skate well for your size, and from all reports, you’re pretty damn good at hockey. Let’s say you’re named Kevin Bahl. I know it’s a funny sounding name, but I dunno, this is my hypothetical so let’s just go with it. ;) 

 

So you’re Kevin Bahl and you get drafted by Avtomobilist Yekaterinburg in the KHL Entry Draft. You sign a contract (with a North American assignment clause) and head over to Russia to give hockey a try in the world’s greatest league.

 

Your late season KHL debut goes well and you head back the next year expecting to progress into a larger role with the team.

 

You arrive at camp for testing and you’re told you’re out of shape. You’re asked if you’d accept a demotion to the MHL. You refuse (as per contract you signed) but you can tell the team isn’t happy with you. And some in the local press runs stories mocking your weight and slagging you for your unwillingness to “play ball” and work with the team.

 

You’re put on a program.

 

Subzero outdoor callisthenics in a Red Army-inspired boot camp, bag skates with a parachute on your back, Putin-style shirtless horseback riding, plus the team nutritionist puts you on a strict diet of cabbage and pickle juice.

 

You do as your told, work hard, and after some gruelling weeks, you’ve hit all the fitness targets and are finally allowed to re-join the team.

 

You play well. Not the best D on the team but also clearly not the worst. You make some mistakes sometimes, like any young player, but you give it your all every night and seem to be making real progress.

 

Some games, it feels like you’ve finally won over the coach and he plays you 20+ minutes. Next game, you play reduced minutes with long stretches on the bench. You feel like you’re playing well and could help the team if you got more icetime. But some games you ride pine even as struggling teammates keep getting sent out for shifts.

 

And you just sit there and watch them serve up khychini for the opponents.

 

You can’t help feeling like you’d have gotten better results than some of the guys the coach keeps playing ahead of you.

 

But you don’t sulk. You keep quiet. You’re a good teammate (and all the other Avto guys say as much). You put your head down and keep working. 

 

You try to be the player they want.

 

You try to do what the coaches ask.

 

And it seems to work. You get to the point where you think maybe, just maybe, you’ve finally figured it out.

 

Coach finally seems happy. Teammates trust you. Fans love you. You have a stretch of games where you get big minutes and have a real impact on the games. It seems like you’ve settled in and established a role with the team.

 

Clips of your one-man wrecking crew antics against hated rivals have become the favourite and most watched highlights for fans. Pundits call you one of the lone bright spots on another otherwise dark and disappointing season. People start talking about you as a future top pairing Dman for the next core of the team.

 

Things really seem to be going well.

 

Then, seemingly out of nowhere, your minutes get cut back yet again. 

 

And after one game, you’re told you need to see the video coach. They want you to watch more hours of old game films of Alexander Ragulin and Valeri Vasiliev.

 

You do as you’re told.

 

Meanwhile, your young wife is unhappy. She’s getting tired of smelling cigarette smoke and vodka fumes everywhere. And none of the other team wives can speak English.

 

She’s lonely and homesick.

 

And, if you’re being honest with yourself, so are you.

 

I mean, you’ve been over in Russia for months now, and you still can’t score any good BC Bud for relaxing on your off days. But that guy on the corner keeps trying to sell you something he calls Krokodil.

 

It’s all starting to wear on you a bit.  

 

Then the wife gets pregnant and she says she wants to have the baby back home and raise the kid around your families back home. And after everything that’s happened over the season, it just feels like the best decision for your life right now.

 

So you agree to finish out the KHL contract and then go back to play for your hometown team. Avto will still retain your rights for several more years.

 

You make it clear that you’re willing to return to the KHL in a few years, but for a whole host of reasons, the Russian experiment just didn’t work out.

 

When questioned in the press, you try to sound diplomatic, but a couple clever interviewers still manage to score some juicy quotes where you mention the issue with your icetime and indirectly criticize your KHL coach (who’s since been fired). And one time when you’re a bit loose with your words, you mention the all the smoking and drinking over there and the locals in Yekaterinburg get pretty offended (even though much of the uproar was due to a bad translation).

 

Many Avto fans still miss you terribly and continually write fawning tweets and posts. Some maybe verge on being a bit creepy, but it’s mostly innocent enough. 

 

Others in the fanbase, however, are far less complimentary.

 

A typical Canadian, they say. Bolting for home when he wasn’t simply gifted the role he wanted. Just doesn’t have the proper work ethic to succeed in the Russian game. Wanted everything to come too easy. Lacked maturity. Wasn’t willing to earn it.

 

They say you’ll never come back. 

 

Still, you say you’d like to return to the KHL in a few years after your current Canadian deal expires. Your dream has always been to play in the best league in the world.

 

So you continue to follow Avto players and watch all their games. You even still wear their colours in your social media profile pictures.

 

But to some fans, you’re just another entitled Canadian who couldn’t hack it in the bigs and packed it in when the going got tough.

 

Just goes to show the “Canadian factor” is always a risk when it comes to professional hockey players. ;) 

Most of this is just made up BS.

 

Sorry SID but can we be clear, this is a pro sportsman we are talking about?

 

Why did he turn up out of shape?

 

Is there a rule somewhere in the coach's handbook that says just because a player gets 20mins one night, he has to get 20mins the following night?

 

How do you know he was doing everything the coaches were asking of him? How do you know it was out of nowhere? How do you know the coaches were happy? How do you know his team mates trusted him? Did he have A REAL IMPACT on the games? How do you know he always did what the coaches wanted? You admit he made mistakes? Why would the team NOT be unhappy with you, turning up out of shape.

 

I gave up after this as it is all just subjective BS and dime novel writing.

 

Tryamkin played on the right, the same side as Gudbranson, Stecher, Tanev, Biega and Larsen. He was not "better" than the first three and arguably on performance not better than Biega either.

That left Larsen who was being given a run of games by JB in order to find out if he was the puck moving D he was looking for. I fail to see where Tryamkin had a beef when he was getting 17mins as 5/6th place D and playing 66 out 82 games. - None of it stacks up, no matter how you look at it.

 

Basically I think your piece is a bit melodramatic and if in any way accurate or justified would see Goldobin scurrying home as we speak. 

 

Nikita Zadorov (Colorado) 6'-5"@230lbs a FIRST round pick 16th o/a was playing 1minute more in his first full season (for Buffalo) then in his next season dropped within 12 secs of Tryamkin and he is still there, still working away.

 

 

Edited by alfstonker
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21 minutes ago, Whorvat said:

Sometimes I wonder if Alfstonker is WD himself

Pretty sure his posts would be more knowledgeable if he was WD. I can't believe that Willie would post the ignorant, obnoxious, fabricated nonsense that Stonker has posted in this thread.

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13 minutes ago, WeneedLumme said:

Pretty sure his posts would be more knowledgeable if he was WD. I can't believe that Willie would post the ignorant, obnoxious, fabricated nonsense that Stonker has posted in this thread.

Don't strain your single brain cell. You haven't the intellect to keep up.

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9 hours ago, SilentSam said:

Zepp,  after everything that has been said or done here..

tell me you aren’t happier to have the rights to a young Hockey Player with the potential that Tryamkin brings, over a Coach who was seemingly spinning his wheels. ?

its all history now,.  and I personally look forward to the future this Team has, with a player like Tryamkin on it, than not.

260 - 6’8” with wheels, than can throw a Benn, Jenner, or Brower like a rag doll.. a bit of a gamble, but really a great pick for JB at that point in the draft.

I have said many times I was not keen on WD as the Canucks coach.   I just don't see how you are linking the issues.    I don't view Tryamkin not being in Vancouver having anything to do with WD IF he is a player you want on a team.    I did and still do like the concept of him as a player - always have - as long as he doesn't have an attitude that would mean quitting if he doesn't like the coaching.   No team needs a player like that.

 

I don't understand how you can relate the two issues or not understand how having a player that would quit for the reasons you are implying is not a player you would want.

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21 minutes ago, Rob_Zepp said:

I have said many times I was not keen on WD as the Canucks coach.   I just don't see how you are linking the issues.    I don't view Tryamkin not being in Vancouver having anything to do with WD IF he is a player you want on a team.    I did and still do like the concept of him as a player - always have - as long as he doesn't have an attitude that would mean quitting if he doesn't like the coaching.   No team needs a player like that.

 

I don't understand how you can relate the two issues or not understand how having a player that would quit for the reasons you are implying is not a player you would want.

By all accounts Virtanen has a terrible attitude.  As long as he gets results (IMO Tryamkin was getting better results than Virtanen) I don't care if he's a nice guy or not.  It was in his contract that he could leave, so he did.  I think he'll be back and dominate. 

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25 minutes ago, CanadianRugby said:

By all accounts Virtanen has a terrible attitude.  As long as he gets results (IMO Tryamkin was getting better results than Virtanen) I don't care if he's a nice guy or not.  It was in his contract that he could leave, so he did.  I think he'll be back and dominate. 

Please cite the "all accounts".   I have met a number of people who have worked with Virtanen who say the exact opposite including one of his former coaches in Calgary.   If you are going to say that about him, please provide where you are getting it.

 

Back to Tryamkin, this has nothing to do with being a "nice guy" - another poster claims he left because he felt hard done by from the coach.   If that is true, I don't think the Canucks should want anything to do with that - any player as a rookie who thinks they can dictate playing conditions, ice-time etc. is not a player that you want.   IF he left due to family reasons, homesick etc. etc.....I have no problem with that as it is his life.   It is only his "hockey player" part that ultimately matters and IF that part of him quits if it gets tough, why would you want him back?    People that quit when things get hard certainly don't "dominate".   

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1 hour ago, stawns said:

No, I'm saying that the reason he stated (coach and lack of ice time) is the main reason he left.  His body language throughout the season reinforces that.

 

He felt he deserved more ice time and when he got his window to head home, he took it.  If that's still his attitude, he can stay in the KHL wasteland.  If he wants to change his attitude, work hard and play with and against the best players in the world, the org will welcome him back.

 

If he thinks WD was a hardass, wait until he meets TG.

/thread.   This is perfect.

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