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Getting a cat


sakage.shinga

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Get a male cat neudered.

You don't need to trim his nails just get him a scratching post (or your walls/couches will pay dearly)

I get Royal Canin vet brand food, its about 20 dollars a month roughly.

I let my cat go outdoors and dont even use a littler box at all, he goes outside. But always bring him inside during night.

Get himi one of those microchips incase it gets lost.

You dont need medical insurance, my cat is outdoor and he pretty much stays out of trouble but you never know.

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Just because you've had cats for along time doesn't mean you treated them well. Too often people just "have cats" and just put up with them like the two below seem to indicate, to actually have a bond, and a loving relationship is a different story.

You make me laugh. If I didn't think you were so clueless about the real world, I'd give you more of a response. You keep reading your articles if they make you feel smart.

I'll just say that you can keep your cats under a nanny state and abuse them on leashes all you want. Just stay away from my cat please. Thanks.

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I've heard otherwise. Dry food will dehydrate cats as they don't like to drink much water, leading to many illnesses and vet bills. If you feed your cats dry food only, I highly suggest keeping an eye on their poop to make sure it isn't dry because it will mean that your cat is in fact dehydrated.

You can always try brushing their teeth, or you can also buy a seaweed kinda stuff (I forget what it's called) to sprinkle on their food that secretes through their gums and helps keep their teeth nice and clean.

Edit: also, knowing how crazy I'm sure we all are as cat owners, who will be the first to post a picture of their cat(s)? I don't want to be the first :P

My cats seem to drink water quite a bit, they also eat grass (grass - not pot!).

Also, male cats are prone to kidney stones - from wet cat food - too much ash or something - can't remember - but the male cat I used to have cost me a lot of money in vet bills...from feeding too much Kal Kan the vet said...even after swithing to the really expensive vet food, he still would get them from time to time...

These 2 are females - both fixed after I rescued them. They are pretty good mousers as well.

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You make me laugh. If I didn't think you were so clueless about the real world, I'd give you more of a response. You keep reading your articles if they make you feel smart.

I'll just say that you can keep your cats under a nanny state and abuse them on leashes all you want. Just stay away from my cat please. Thanks.

I hope your cat pees on your bed.

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Food plays a BIG roll on how much a cat sheds.. Garbage stuff from you're local supermarket is a no no.. Sadly if you want less shedding.. more expensive food is needed. Also there was this one brand of cat litter I bought from petcetera.. For the life of me I cannot remember the name of it.. Came in a peachy pink logo bag.. was like 9$ for a 40lbs.. And I would NEVER smell her crap(other than freshly deposited crap) I dont know if petcetera is still open in a lot of places as I know it finally shut down here in Saskatoon. But it was good litter

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:lol: some funny posts in here.

Have fed my aging cat "whiskas" all his life and have never had a problem. Also feel it would be downright cruel to not let him outside as he has a desperate desire to be outside(just like us humans do...and we fully accept the possible risks of leaving our houses). Thankfully, we live at the end of a cul-de-sac, he doesn't go very far(prefers to lounge on the back deck) and always comes in at night.

Good luck with your new pet, OP. Cats are a great addition to the family!! :)

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So my parents are thinking of getting a cat, and naturally it falls to me to do all the research for them and then explaining it to them. So far I've decided (for them) that they're going to adopt from a local SPCA or Animal Rescue, that it will be a male kitten, and that declawing is definitely OFF the table.

I understand that while cats are comparatively easier to care for than dogs, they still require brushing, nail clipping, and a litter box that is emptied daily and cleaned weekly. However, I do have some other questions.

1) Will a short hair cat generally shed less?

2) When a cat owner goes on vacation, either a day trip or for a few days, are there paid shelters that he can be sent to? What do cat owners generally do in such cases?

3) Medical insurance, do cats need them? I've heard people who swear by them, but others that just pay out of pocket.

4) As a rough ball park, how much are my parents looking at as annual expenses?

5) When it comes to cat breeds, I'm of the understanding that it's more or less aesthetics only, and that mixed breeds are healthier than pure breds. Is this true?

6) Suggestions for brands of dry + wet food?

Aside from this, any other tips or suggestions are more than welcome.

Thanks!

You aren't allowed to declaw a cat you get from the SPCA anyways. It's right in the adoption agreement. I would be willing to bet it's pretty well the same for most shelters. Don't just rule out getting a kitten from someone who has taken care of and is giving away kittens that their cat had. That's how I got my first cat and what the vet actually recommended when I was looking for a kitten.

1) Not sure since I've only ever had short haired cats. Some just shed more than others. The only one I ever brush is the one that sheds a lot and even then I don't do it very often. I think it's more important with long hairs though.

2) If I'm only going to be gone for the day, I'll just give the cats all their food for the day and they're fine. If it's a couple of days, I'll have someone come over and check on them. If it's longer than that then I get a house sitter. It's preferable for them to stay in their own house rather than be carted off somewhere.

3) Never had medical insurance for any of the 3 cats. Unless you happen to end up with a cat that needs a lot of medical attention, you would probably be further ahead to take the money you'd spend on insurance and put it in an account earmarked for vet bills.

4) No idea. I'm used to having two cats, spending a ton for house sitting, and having an older finicky one with a tender stomach who only ate expensive food. So I really have no idea how much a typical cat would cost.

5) I wouldn't worry too much about mixed or pure breed. Just go for the kitten that you feel will be the best fit. The cats personality is a lot more important.

6) I feed my cats vet food but really any other high quality food would be fine.

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and yeah, you really should let your cat go outside.. If it's cooped up inside all day it wil get depressed. Of course there's a bit of risk involved in letting your cat go outside but they are smart (and fast) animals.. They can usually take care of themself.

Had a little bit of a scare the other day when I woke up to this though..

But they seemed to just be curiuos of each other lol.
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I got a kitten and its ute and fluffy and all but it looks like my hands were at war with needles. I have cuts everywhere. Its litter stinks so f****** bad. It scratches everything and we bought a spray bottle to spray her when she does it but it makes her do it more. Cat nip has no effect on here. Ant-scratch/bite spray doesn’t work.

But the cat is cute...

HAHA I lol'd

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My cat headbutts things a lot. Including my face when I'm sleeping and the dishwasher for some reason.

Wellness brand foods are the best I've found. Whatever you get, don't get anything with corn or grains as just filler. That's garbage.

We regularly leave our cat for weekends and he's fine. He's a fierce moth hunter and the best thing is he eats them, doesn't just kill and leave it lying around. Flies, daddy long legs too. He tried a bee once, that didn't go well for him.

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I think it depends where you live. I used to live near the pne and everywhere in my neighbourhood there were missing cat posters because we had coyotes in the area.

I personally do not want to risk Gilly getting run over by a car or eaten by a wild animal or lost so I personally keep her inside and just bring her out on the leash or sometimes even just carry her outside and supervise her in the back yard or something.

FYI, there's more coyotes, foxes, cougars etc in more rural areas than in the city. Just saying.

nobody listen to Heretic, dry food only diets are widely frowned upon by pretty much every vet you ask

Pretty much. Cat's dehydrate much more commonly than dogs and NEED moisture in at least some of their food. Dry food only diets have also be linked to kidney and bladder stones.

OP, whatever you choose to feed them just make sure it has a high protein content (wet and dry food). If their are any grains it should be brown rice. You can also look in to a raw meat or partial raw meat diet as it's closest to their natural diet.

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FYI, there's more coyotes, foxes, cougars etc in more rural areas than in the city. Just saying.

Pretty much. Cat's dehydrate much more commonly than dogs and NEED moisture in at least some of their food. Dry food only diets have also be linked to kidney and bladder stones.

OP, whatever you choose to feed them just make sure it has a high protein content (wet and dry food). If their are any grains it should be brown rice. You can also look in to a raw meat or partial raw meat diet as it's closest to their natural diet.

I am aware of that as well, I was just giving an example as to why I think it's foolish to allow kitties outside. Personally my cat(s) are in door kitties only.

We also forgot to mention the fact that birds have suffered greatly because of outdoor kitties. There is articles on this I can upload later if you want.

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nobody listen to Heretic, dry food only diets are widely frowned upon by pretty much every vet you ask

Okay, after checking into it, I agree, seems cats do need moist food as well.

Like I said, the issue I had was with a male cat, he eventually died due to complications from too many kidney stones and getting his urethral blocked too many times. It was so hard to see him in so much pain - vet said it was from the moist food I gave him. He died in my arms.

My current cats (and dogs) also get eggs as we get a lot from our chickens...so maybe that's the moisture we supplement with them...

I am aware of that as well, I was just giving an example as to why I think it's foolish to allow kitties outside. Personally my cat(s) are in door kitties only.

We also forgot to mention the fact that birds have suffered greatly because of outdoor kitties. There is articles on this I can upload later if you want.

My cats go outside and they help keep the mouse population down on our hobby farm.

My Dogs are outdoors 24x7 - they keep the deer and coyotes and raccoon off the property and away from our chickens.

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I am aware of that as well, I was just giving an example as to why I think it's foolish to allow kitties outside. Personally my cat(s) are in door kitties only.

We also forgot to mention the fact that birds have suffered greatly because of outdoor kitties. There is articles on this I can upload later if you want.

Growing up we had a cat that was indoor/outdoor cat. She almost always came home every day. We could just call off the porch and she would come running from wherever she was. She did disappear for a week once and we found on the greenbelt behind the house just sitting on a log.

My brother has 2 cats who live on his small acreage. They come in and out as they please and spend many nights outside. You can find them in the doghouse quite often. They are ferocious hunters and work in tandem to kill anything they can.

Whoever wrote that myth that because they are domesticated that they can't live outside is just fear mongering.

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I've had a cat pretty much all my life.

2- This one makes me laugh. Cats are the most independent pets you can have. Not only are they fine for a few days or more but we've left ours outside countless times when we've gone away for the weekend and they survive just fine. Indoors, just make sure they have the litter box, food and water. They sleep the rest of the time.

3 - We've never bought insurance. Maybe we've been lucky but I'm on my 3rd cat and aside from medical checkups and the odd medical issue (always minor) we've never had any problems.

Cats are great. Not as needy as dogs. And I have a dog now too so dogs lovers can chill.

This^ Cats are just fine to be left alone for a couple of days provide they have lots of food and water and access to outside and/or a clean litter box. Any longer than 3 days I would look into a pet sitter or boarding it.

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