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Getting a cat


sakage.shinga

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DO NOT buy cheap cat food. They are loaded with bad ingredients that'll lead to problems for your cat, such as bladder issues.

Get some natural cat food. It costs around $16-$20 for a medium-sized bag.

Also, feed your cat some wet food about once every day/other day so that it helps with digestion. It'll keep them happy because they get tired of having to eat the tasteless dry food.

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Growing up we had a cat that was indoor/outdoor cat. She almost always came home every day. We could just call off the porch and she would come running from wherever she was. She did disappear for a week once and we found on the greenbelt behind the house just sitting on a log.

My brother has 2 cats who live on his small acreage. They come in and out as they please and spend many nights outside. You can find them in the doghouse quite often. They are ferocious hunters and work in tandem to kill anything they can.

Whoever wrote that myth that because they are domesticated that they can't live outside is just fear mongering.

I live in the city I am not allowing my furbaby outside to possibly be hit by a car or eaten by a coyote or other wild animal.

The few times Gilly escaped she ran to the front door and cried to be let back in.

It sounds like you live in an area where you do not have to worry about traffic and other human dangers to your kitties.

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I live in the city I am not allowing my furbaby outside to possibly be hit by a car or eaten by a coyote or other wild animal.

The few times Gilly escaped she ran to the front door and cried to be let back in.

It sounds like you live in an area where you do not have to worry about traffic and other human dangers to your kitties.

I live in a cul de sac but one block off a pretty major roadway in the suburbs and our cat is outside most of the day, usually returning at night but occasionally staying out (more so in the summer).

He LOVES being outside and whines incessantly if we try to keep him in during the day (for say a vet visit or if we're going away overnight). He'd be miserable as an indoor only cat. He'd also get nowhere near the exercise and he keeps the yard free of rodents while out there.

IMO, it's very individual cat dependent. Just like people, some cats prefer the outdoors, some don't. If you have a couch potato cat, that's fine... but let's not try to paint them all with the same brush in that regard.

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DO NOT buy cheap cat food. They are loaded with bad ingredients that'll lead to problems for your cat, such as bladder issues.

Get some natural cat food. It costs around $16-$20 for a medium-sized bag.

Also, feed your cat some wet food about once every day/other day so that it helps with digestion. It'll keep them happy because they get tired of having to eat the tasteless dry food.

This. You need to alternate wet and dry food. Not just wet or dry, they need both.

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and yeah, you really should let your cat go outside.. If it's cooped up inside all day it wil get depressed. Of course there's a bit of risk involved in letting your cat go outside but they are smart (and fast) animals.. They can usually take care of themself.

Had a little bit of a scare the other day when I woke up to this though..

But they seemed to just be curiuos of each other lol.

Cool.. our cats over the years have gotten into a few scuffles with the neighborhood Raccoon posse. (Though YEARS ago my parent's cat asked for it when he jumped a baby and got chased by the mom.)

Worst was later when one of my cats was cornered by a HUGE one that looked like a miniature bear. She managed to fight her way free but it was a 200 dollar vet bill to get her hind paw all patched up. Now we live in a condo so they're (surprisingly) content to stay indoors.. though they like their "supervised deck time."

...

To answer some of the OP's questions - try and get a short-hair if you're more worried about shedding than fluffiness. Of the 5 (not all at once) cats I've had all have been short hair - 3 barely shed, but 2 still shed a bit.)

-Like Tanikins said, it's worth looking into getting two kittens together if you're going to be away a lot. We got a second kitten shortly after the we got the first one and I'd say "quality of cat-life" went up substantially. Cats are a billion times more independent than dogs but they're still social - if we leave for a weekend we have someone pop in to check food and water. They always find the cats sleeping close or even cuddling. They don't do that when we're home. Don't wait until they're both cats to do this, though or they'll be mortal enemies.

-I'm not sure if pet insurance is a must, but expect one decent ~$200 vet bill if they're outside cats. It's also more dangerous (we sent one cat to the vet for killing a sick bird and another for getting into a fight with what looked like a huge blue-jay peck on her arm.) If you live in the city, just don't do it - they'll be roadkill.

-Pretty sure mixed-breeds are healthier, just like dogs. Great idea going to SPCA or a local rescue - LAPS in Langley has kittens usually!

-For food, we've used the fancy vet stuff and the normal stuff... probably a difference but all I've noticed is they puke more often if you change the food on them. Pick a decent brand and stick with it!

-Finally, yes, a big cat post is a must.

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Hmm.. reading this thread I should start buying wet food again.. I have no problem with it but my "significant other" gets mad since she thinks its bad for them (I buy the cheap tin of chicken and gravy friskies then refer to it as "cat mcdonalds").

On the topic of hydration - cats love running water. Pick up a little cat fountain - especially if you don't want to be bossed over to the tap every time they want a drink.

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So my parents are thinking of getting a cat, and naturally it falls to me to do all the research for them and then explaining it to them. So far I've decided (for them) that they're going to adopt from a local SPCA or Animal Rescue, that it will be a male kitten, and that declawing is definitely OFF the table.

I understand that while cats are comparatively easier to care for than dogs, they still require brushing, nail clipping, and a litter box that is emptied daily and cleaned weekly. However, I do have some other questions.

1) Will a short hair cat generally shed less?

2) When a cat owner goes on vacation, either a day trip or for a few days, are there paid shelters that he can be sent to? What do cat owners generally do in such cases?

3) Medical insurance, do cats need them? I've heard people who swear by them, but others that just pay out of pocket.

4) As a rough ball park, how much are my parents looking at as annual expenses?

5) When it comes to cat breeds, I'm of the understanding that it's more or less aesthetics only, and that mixed breeds are healthier than pure breds. Is this true?

6) Suggestions for brands of dry + wet food?

Aside from this, any other tips or suggestions are more than welcome.

Thanks!

My ex and I had a cat a few years back. Nail clipping is not required as they frequently sharpen/ shorten their claws on trees and posts. Declawing is considered inhumane as it retards their mobility. People get cats to get rid of rats and its pretty effective - clawing also retards this feature. As for innoculations, it can lead to side effects so you want to be careful. We immunized once and that was it - no health issues. Mixed breeds are great, just go for what you want. Dont buy one as it supports inhumane breeder mills.

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Cats are super low maitenance, going away for a weekend is certainly no problem. The key is temperment. Rag doll breeds are the best, they are docile and un concerned with playful human antics. Give them middle of the road food and treat them with chicken carcass scraps (deboned) sardine and tuna juice.

A real key is crinkly packaging ;) have some treats on hand to round them up when you want them in or out.

Scientific studies show that a cat that love you (hops onto you when on the comp or in bed) will provide you with a different form of love that humans do not provide... Their purrs envoke love and bait you to pet them so its a win win. Also a great ice breaker with females or males. Less so than a dog which you can take anywhere, but a housecat will be just enough (If you tolerate it in bed) to bring upon those cute little moments that arent had with any other pet IMO.

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I have a question pertaining to my cat.

She is on a dry food diet, it's veterinary brand food, it's a gastro-intestinal for her gastro issues. Does anyone have recommendations for a good wet food that I could give her? I didn't realize the importance of wet food for cats until reading through this thread. . . :sadno:

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I have a question pertaining to my cat.

She is on a dry food diet, it's veterinary brand food, it's a gastro-intestinal for her gastro issues. Does anyone have recommendations for a good wet food that I could give her? I didn't realize the importance of wet food for cats until reading through this thread. . . :sadno:

Ask your vet.

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People wanting to get the "easiest" pet, etc. should really rethink their decision. All pets have moments that are difficult. Leaving them for days is also not really responsible pet ownership...what if they do have a medical issue or something happens? Responsible pet ownership means you care for them daily, not intermittently.

Cats can live a long time so think about that as well...sounds like a great idea but will it work for you in 15-20 years.

Not trying to discourage anyone, but there's nothing worse than an animal who HAS counted on someone as family who changes their mind and ditches them. I deal with all kinds of those animals...someone has to.

If from the start your thinking is "because it's easier", you likely aren't ready to accept the full responsibility of a pet.

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and yeah, you really should let your cat go outside.. If it's cooped up inside all day it wil get depressed. Of course there's a bit of risk involved in letting your cat go outside but they are smart (and fast) animals.. They can usually take care of themself.

Had a little bit of a scare the other day when I woke up to this though..

But they seemed to just be curiuos of each other lol.

The cat won't get depressed if you give it attention....and you were lucky your cat survived a raccoon encounter (looks like a young one?). That isn't usually the case. :)

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I live in a cul de sac but one block off a pretty major roadway in the suburbs and our cat is outside most of the day, usually returning at night but occasionally staying out (more so in the summer).

He LOVES being outside and whines incessantly if we try to keep him in during the day (for say a vet visit or if we're going away overnight). He'd be miserable as an indoor only cat. He'd also get nowhere near the exercise and he keeps the yard free of rodents while out there.

IMO, it's very individual cat dependent. Just like people, some cats prefer the outdoors, some don't. If you have a couch potato cat, that's fine... but let's not try to paint them all with the same brush in that regard.

I am not trying to paint all cats in the same brush and I do not have a couch potato cat thank you very much. I am sure even if I allowed her outside on a regular basis she would love it, I choose due to the area I live in, due to wild life such as raccoons, due to living next door to large dogs. Due to the horrors humans themselves can inflict on a cat that it's in my kitties best interest to not be allowed outside unsupervised. This is also what my vet recommended. If I lived in a safer more country type area then sure she could go out but I don't and I feel keeping her safe is more important.

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I am not trying to paint all cats in the same brush and I do not have a couch potato cat thank you very much. I am sure even if I allowed her outside on a regular basis she would love it, I choose due to the area I live in, due to wild life such as raccoons, due to living next door to large dogs. Due to the horrors humans themselves can inflict on a cat that it's in my kitties best interest to not be allowed outside unsupervised. This is also what my vet recommended. If I lived in a safer more country type area then sure she could go out but I don't and I feel keeping her safe is more important.

You sound a bit like a "helicopter" parent with your kitty :P

"If you truly love something, set it free.."

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