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Getting a cat


sakage.shinga

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I live in the city I am not allowing my furbaby outside to possibly be hit by a car or eaten by a coyote or other wild animal.

The few times Gilly escaped she ran to the front door and cried to be let back in.

It sounds like you live in an area where you do not have to worry about traffic and other human dangers to your kitties.

I don't live there anymore but my parents do. They have two cats that were my sister's and they were indoor cats in the lower mainland but lived in a condo so going outside was not an option. My parents still keep them as indoor cats as they are afraid that they won't last outside where they live.

There were far more dangers to my old cat than traffic and humans. There were black bears, red foxes and porcupines all over the place. We thought she was toast on a few occasions but she always survived relatively unscathed. You would think that a white cat with black patches would stick out like a sore thumb but she was a survivor and a killing machine.

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I don't live there anymore but my parents do. They have two cats that were my sister's and they were indoor cats in the lower mainland but lived in a condo so going outside was not an option. My parents still keep them as indoor cats as they are afraid that they won't last outside where they live.

There were far more dangers to my old cat than traffic and humans. There were black bears, red foxes and porcupines all over the place. We thought she was toast on a few occasions but she always survived relatively unscathed. You would think that a white cat with black patches would stick out like a sore thumb but she was a survivor and a killing machine.

I think you got super lucky :)

I have a friend who lives on a huge farm they have a lot of animals including two kitties. She allowed her kitties to play outside even though their were coyote sightings, she figured because they had dogs the cats would be safe. She lost both cats to coyotes in a two week period. It was quite sad as one was just a baby and the other was her childhood cat.

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Pets are a forever type responsibilty. If your parents have never had a cat I would recommend they speak with the SPCA about boarding a cat ( indoors ) for a week. Not all but some SPCA's and vets seek temporary homes for cats. This would give your parents a chance to see what pet ownership is about prior to commiting.

Also many people overloook the benefits of adopting adult cats. An older cat with an established behavior pattern may be more to their suiting.

Anyhow as a house with 2 cats in it - let me assure you that cat's in fact do not have owners - they have servants!!!

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Hahaha. The Bengal is the slim one I assume? Post some pics

At least your other cat knows that bones are for dogs, and meat is for the duce.

Correct on all counts... ill try and find one for the pet thread. Funny timing she just threw a fit at some dog we're looking after for taking a nibble out of her bowl. Not typical skinny girl behavior.

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So my parents are thinking of getting a cat, and naturally it falls to me to do all the research for them and then explaining it to them. So far I've decided (for them) that they're going to adopt from a local SPCA or Animal Rescue, that it will be a male kitten, and that declawing is definitely OFF the table.

I understand that while cats are comparatively easier to care for than dogs, they still require brushing, nail clipping, and a litter box that is emptied daily and cleaned weekly. However, I do have some other questions.

1) Will a short hair cat generally shed less?

2) When a cat owner goes on vacation, either a day trip or for a few days, are there paid shelters that he can be sent to? What do cat owners generally do in such cases?

3) Medical insurance, do cats need them? I've heard people who swear by them, but others that just pay out of pocket.

4) As a rough ball park, how much are my parents looking at as annual expenses?

5) When it comes to cat breeds, I'm of the understanding that it's more or less aesthetics only, and that mixed breeds are healthier than pure breds. Is this true?

6) Suggestions for brands of dry + wet food?

Aside from this, any other tips or suggestions are more than welcome.

Thanks!

1) no, any cat is going to shed, just depends on the length of hair that will be shed lol.

2) if an owner goes away there are Boarding facilities that will care for your cat while you are away, many cat only facilities as well. Look around, do your research, Boarding facilities require cerain things to be updated re: certain vaccines likely at least Rabies and FVRCP, also flea control or dewormer. This can be specific to each Boarding lace.

2) if you are an owner and you go away, if you have a pet-sitter, make sure you provide authorization for said pet-sitter to bring your cat to the Veterinarian's office on your behalf as well as what the person is authorized to decide or pay for. Many places do not accept random people bringing in someone's pet, to many liability issues and there is a chance of being turned away unless its a true emergency meaning the animal is crashing and needs to be stabilized.

3) Medical insurance is a great idea, maybe not for everyone but if you get insurance on a younger cat/dog you will pay less monthly, if the animal through life develops any significant health issues or gets into 10 yrs old plus then you can expect to have your insurance company give you a lower percentage back. Pet Insurance helps Veterinarians provide better quality service to patients, there is no monetary gain to the clinics, only being able to provide better quality. Let's face it Veterinarian prices are expensive, still cheaper than human medicine sadly most people don't realize this.

Another option is having your parents open a separate savings account at the bank for your pet, place $ 50 or so a month in the account, should an emergency or large expense arise there will be some cushion to fall back on.

4) Annual expense depends on food, litter, annual wellness exams and any associated costs. Aim for over a thousand at least.

5) At the end of the day the breeds don't really matter. It's how your cat is cared for. If you buy cheap low grade grocery store cat food and feed lots of treats and wet food, then the cat will likely develop problems no matter what breed. Learn healthier options for feeding and maintaining your cat's health and learn your cat's behaviours and body language, it can tell you a lot re: your cat may be in pain when you think it is just " off of food " for some reason, etc.

6) For food you don't need to be talked into buying an expensive Veterinary brand, but you do get what you pay for. Look for a maintenance dry food, something that will maintain dental health and something also that can provide urinary health. Some cats are prone to developing crystals which can require coslty veterinary visits if left unattended. If you visit a Veterinarian they can recommend a diet that will maintain urinary and dental health.

Wet food, again most Veterinarians can recommend a diet that is best suited to your cat's specific needs. If a cat has dental issues, such as needing a teeth cleaning or showing signs of periodontal disease wet food can actually make the issue worse.

But again you get what you pay for, some people feed their cats good ole temptations and canned food from the grocery store, choose what works for you and your budget.

Just remember this is a life long commitment, cats do get very real health issues and one should expect to put money into their cats health over the course of their lives. One thing to note is bringing a new cat into your home can be very stressful on the cat, same goes for any renovations in the house, people visiting with pets and so on.

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Cats shed the same for the most part, but DSH appear to be less as their fur is shorter.

We have an auto feeder/waterer - else yes, you can let someone look after your cat.

No - never had insurance for any animal - had them all my life.

($250 a year for cat litter, $250 or so for cat food, $100 or so for vet bill) = $600 a year.

Plus throw in things like collars and toys and beds...

Problem with pure breds (of any animal) is sometimes there's too much inbreeding with can lead to imperfections. Had a purebred Shiatsu - died when she was only 2 and a half - heart failure. I've had a Siamese cross cat live 20 years as the oldest animal.

DRY FOOD ONLY! Moist food will rot your cat (or dogs) teeth. Worst thing anyone can give their pets is canned pet food.

The 2 cats I have now are DSH crosses I'm assuming, they were farm kittens I rescued from a fire (farm was a drug op) and one is "calico" and the other "Tortise shell". Great cats.

while it's true that wet food can contribute to tooth decay and the development of periodontal disease if given too much. On the flip side, not having enough wet food and water may put cats at risk to develop crystals and in male cats that means being blocked ( straining to urinate, unable to pass such crystals and if not hospitalized the bladder can explode if a catheter is not placed ) in females an issue but the male's longer urethra poses the problem of getting blocked. If you notice your cat straining or vocalizing in the litterbox please do not ignore this.

So a good balance of wet and dry food is essential as well as plenty of access to water. Especially in older cats maintaining good hydration is very important.

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