Jump to content
The Official Site of the Vancouver Canucks
Canucks Community

NYC gives the green light to the building of apartments with a 'poor door' for tenants living in affordable housing


freebuddy

Recommended Posts

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2699325/NYC-gives-green-light-building-apartments-poor-door-tenants-living-affordable-housing.html

By Kirk Maltais

22:04 20 Jul 2014, updated 09:36 21 Jul 2014

The City approved a proposal from Extell, a prominent NYC developer, to install a separate door for tenants living in affordable housing units to enter the building

Extell applied for the Inclusionary Housing Program, which allows developer to construct bigger properties if the property includes affordable units for less-wealthy tenants

Extell's application met with considerable backlash when it was initially proposed in August 2013

The City of New York approved a proposal by one of the largest real estate developers in the city to build in a 'poor door', or a separate door for residents living in affordable housing to enter their building.

According to a Saturday report from the New York Post, the city approved the application of Extell, one of the most prominent developers in New York, to install this separate set of doors into a high-rise located on 40 Riverside Boulevard, a location situated next to the Hudson River.

Extell's proposal allows them to force affordable housing tenants to walk through an entrance located in a back alley behind the building to enter, leaving the more prominent front entrance for tenants paying for nicer apartments.

+1

A view of the high-rises lining Riverside Boulevard, in New York. The city has approved an application by prominent developer Extell to install a 'poor door', or a separate door for tenants living in affordable housing to enter the building through

Under the Inclusionary Housing Program, for which the city approved Nextell's application, larger properties are allowed to be built as long as they include a portion of affordable housing units.

For the 40 Riverside Boulevard location, 55 units will be designated as affordable housing, all units facing the street. Another 219 units will face the river.

A spokesman for the NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development confirmed that the agency had approved Extells application for the Inclusionary Housing Program.

Despite the approval of this application, the New York Post reports that Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer vowed to reject future developments with separate entrances.

Extell applied to the Inclusionary Housing program in August 2013, which drew the ire of many critics, including Christine Quinn, who was running for Mayor at the time. Quinn called for a change of laws to force developers to provide common entrances for all occupants.

However, some developers dismiss the outcry over the 'poor door' concept.

'No one ever said that the goal was full integration of these populations,' David Von Spreckelsen, senior vice president at Toll Brothers, another developer specializing in luxury residencies, told The Real Deal in 2013. 'So now you have politicians talking about that, saying how horrible those back doors are. I think its unfair to expect very high-income homeowners who paid a fortune to live in their building to have to be in the same boat as low-income renters, who are very fortunate to live in a new building in a great neighborhood.'

Toll Brothers developed the high-rise at 1 Northshore Pier, a luxury building in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. This building purpotedly includes a 'poor door.'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What is the problem? In Vancouver, housing projects that must have a social housing component have separate buildings or sections from the market housing. They have separate entrances.

Even in coal harbour developments, the the City of Vancouver mandate a certain component for social housing. The social housing does not need to be in the same building.

The Woodward project is the same. One building is set aside for social housing and the other may be market housing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What is the problem? In Vancouver, housing projects that must have a social housing component have separate buildings or sections from the market housing. They have separate entrances.

Even in coal harbour developments, the the City of Vancouver mandate a certain component for social housing. The social housing does not need to be in the same building.

The Woodward project is the same. One building is set aside for social housing and the other may be market housing.

Doesnt it remind you of the segregated Southern USA of the 50s with seperate entrances for blacks and whites?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

No. Care to explain the comparison?

Yes, separate entrances for blacks compared to whites back in the day. Instead of bias for colour, we're now getting bias for your financial status. What's next? Only wealthy people sit in the front of a bus, everyone else stands and sits in the back?

So much for all men/women are created equal. It's Animal Farm. Some are more equal than others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't see that big of a problem here. People that pay the majority of the money and spearhead these projects allow people to have a place to live that is more affordable to them. If the price to have an affordable house over your head is to use a separate entrance from the stuck-up jerkwads with money I think it's a small price to pay to keep everyone happy and put a roof over one's head.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One thing that I was looking for clarification on while reading the article is if the residences are actually separated in any way once you're inside the building. If there is some sort of a division where one set or residents can't physically access the other side, then there could be the argument that they are two buildings built together. Otherwise it's really just a perception and status issue.

I don't see it as exactly the same as the black/white segregation in the 50s, since that happened for everyone regardless of their status in public places. Some people have basically paid to access through one specific door in the building they live in versus the other and while it does create class separation through economic status, it's no different from if they had build the buildings on opposite corners of the block.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, separate entrances for blacks compared to whites back in the day. Instead of bias for colour, we're now getting bias for your financial status. What's next? Only wealthy people sit in the front of a bus, everyone else stands and sits in the back?

So much for all men/women are created equal. It's Animal Farm. Some are more equal than others.

You mean like on the airplanes? Are you saying we should have super premium seats on the buses as a way to subsidise the rest of the bus? Not sure if it would work but if it did I would think we should jump all over it!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One thing that I was looking for clarification on while reading the article is if the residences are actually separated in any way once you're inside the building. If there is some sort of a division where one set or residents can't physically access the other side, then there could be the argument that they are two buildings built together. Otherwise it's really just a perception and status issue.

I don't see it as exactly the same as the black/white segregation in the 50s, since that happened for everyone regardless of their status in public places. Some people have basically paid to access through one specific door in the building they live in versus the other and while it does create class separation through economic status, it's no different from if they had build the buildings on opposite corners of the block.

Already most places with a penthouse tend to have a seperate entrance route for that. Heck, even paying big bucks to be a season ticket holder for the Canucks doesn't make me cool enough to use the seperate entrances and areas they have for the club seats and even those people don't have the same accesses as the people in the luxury boxes.

Already mentioned the planes.

When you pay for premium service one of the premium services tends to be being able to sepearate oneself from the thronging masses, should they want.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really don't think that this is as much of a big deal as some are making it out to be, beginning with the individual who first labelled it the "poor door".

As long as the entrance is easy to access, and safe (a New York alley can be safe?), who cares? People who need a cheap home get one, as opposed to the alternative where there is no affordable housing and they would be living in the alley anyways. Okay too far maybe, but whatever.

I know that Ghosts and rontheciv are joking, but clearly premium seating wouldn't work on buses, unless there was a separate entrance...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are the people that use the poor door offended or is it people offended on behalf of them?

I think most black people would want to smack you for even trying to equate the two.

Reminds me of when a group of "Legalize it" protesters likened themselves to Rosa Parks.

Yeah, not even close.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, separate entrances for blacks compared to whites back in the day. Instead of bias for colour, we're now getting bias for your financial status. What's next? Only wealthy people sit in the front of a bus, everyone else stands and sits in the back?

So much for all men/women are created equal. It's Animal Farm. Some are more equal than others.

Right, and staying at the Bayshore should cost the same as a motel, and everyone should be able to afford dining at Hart House instead of McD's every time they eat out.(havent done any finer dining downtown to give a better example)

I would think living in that kind of place would beat the hell out of living in a fully "affordable" housing project.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, separate entrances for blacks compared to whites back in the day. Instead of bias for colour, we're now getting bias for your financial status. What's next? Only wealthy people sit in the front of a bus, everyone else stands and sits in the back?

So much for all men/women are created equal. It's Animal Farm. Some are more equal than others.

In our society, yes wealthy people get more benefits. Our society is (supposed to in theory) guarantee equality of opportunity, not equality of outcome.

Your bus example already pretty much happens in real life. The closest parallel is on airlines, with first class seats at the front of planes, get to board first, get more legroom, better food, etc. It's not because they are rich, it's because they paid extra money. Anyone has the opportunity to buy first class tickets if they want to. It's not like racism because black people had no choice but to be segregated and there was nothing they could do about it.

In reality this "poor door" issue is more complicated than I'm making it out to be, but it's still not nearly as bad as racism, since technically anyone can use the main door as long as they pay for the nicer units.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really don't think that this is as much of a big deal as some are making it out to be, beginning with the individual who first labelled it the "poor door".

As long as the entrance is easy to access, and safe (a New York alley can be safe?), who cares? People who need a cheap home get one, as opposed to the alternative where there is no affordable housing and they would be living in the alley anyways. Okay too far maybe, but whatever.

I know that Ghosts and rontheciv are joking, but clearly premium seating wouldn't work on buses, unless there was a separate entrance...

Only joking in that it wouldn't be feasible as there is already a premium bus service for rich people. They are called limos. Which if you want to enjoy next time you have a large group going to the airport (two cabs worth) then it's actually one of the most competive economically ways to get there!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, separate entrances for blacks compared to whites back in the day. Instead of bias for colour, we're now getting bias for your financial status. What's next? Only wealthy people sit in the front of a bus, everyone else stands and sits in the back?

So much for all men/women are created equal. It's Animal Farm. Some are more equal than others.

Handicapped get preference over the non-handicapped to be in the front. They also get all the best parking spots.

Women and men get separate washroom entrances, often times even families!

It's just so unfair, I tell you. People treated differently. Next thing you know, your boss will be treated as your superior! Or children might have to take orders from their parents! It's Animal Farm.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...