Jump to content
The Official Site of the Vancouver Canucks
Canucks Community

Today, August 4, is the 100th Anniversary of the Start of WWI


DonLever

Recommended Posts

On Monday, European leaders and royalty were to gather in Belgium, whose soil became the first battleground of World War One.

The assassination of Austro-Hungarian Archduke Franz Ferdinand on June 28, 1914 by a Serb nationalist set into a motion a chain of events that resulted in diplomatic chaos. Europe's empires found themselves entangled in complicated military alliances which forced them to take sides once Germany declared war on France on August 4. It invaded Belgium the next day.

The four years of bloodshed that followed left an indelible mark on all who were involved. One hundred years later and eyewitnesses long gone, descendents of the first actors in the war - Germany, Belgium, France and England - gathered in remembrance.

Events were scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. local time (0800 UTC) in the eastern city of Liege, where the war's first major battle took place over the course of 12 days following the German invasion.

Following a speech by Belgium's King Philippe, both the French and the German presidents - Francois Hollande and Joachim Gauck - were to deliver addresses. The United Kingdom's Prince William and Belgium's prime minister, Elio Di Rupo, were also scheduled to speak at Monday's event.

A separate Belgian-German ceremony was scheduled to take place later in the day in Leuven, followed by a memorial service led by British leaders at the St. Symphorien military cemetery in the town of Mons.

Great Britain also planned to hold a centary commemoration in Glasgow Cathedral on Monday, as August 4 also marks the island-nation's entry into World War One.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Great Uncle John served in Artillery during the war. Thank God he wasn't on the front lines. My Dad served in Korea in the Canadian Signal Corps. He would only talk about the good times, he was very silent on the bad times. I think he saw and heard a lot more than he ever wanted to.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Great Uncle John served in Artillery during the war. Thank God he wasn't on the front lines. My Dad served in Korea in the Canadian Signal Corps. He would only talk about the good times, he was very silent on the bad times. I think he saw and heard a lot more than he ever wanted to.

Gunners!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On Monday, European leaders and royalty were to gather in Belgium, whose soil became the first battleground of World War One.

The assassination of Austro-Hungarian Archduke Franz Ferdinand on June 28, 1914 by a Serb nationalist set into a motion a chain of events that resulted in diplomatic chaos. Europe's empires found themselves entangled in complicated military alliances which forced them to take sides once Germany declared war on France on August 4. It invaded Belgium the next day.

The four years of bloodshed that followed left an indelible mark on all who were involved. One hundred years later and eyewitnesses long gone, descendents of the first actors in the war - Germany, Belgium, France and England - gathered in remembrance.

Events were scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. local time (0800 UTC) in the eastern city of Liege, where the war's first major battle took place over the course of 12 days following the German invasion.

Following a speech by Belgium's King Philippe, both the French and the German presidents - Francois Hollande and Joachim Gauck - were to deliver addresses. The United Kingdom's Prince William and Belgium's prime minister, Elio Di Rupo, were also scheduled to speak at Monday's event.

A separate Belgian-German ceremony was scheduled to take place later in the day in Leuven, followed by a memorial service led by British leaders at the St. Symphorien military cemetery in the town of Mons.

Great Britain also planned to hold a centary commemoration in Glasgow Cathedral on Monday, as August 4 also marks the island-nation's entry into World War One.

I think what concerns me is that world issues at present are very similar. There are hot spots all over the globe. I have the feeling we're about to engage in another WW.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Great Uncle John served in Artillery during the war. Thank God he wasn't on the front lines. My Dad served in Korea in the Canadian Signal Corps. He would only talk about the good times, he was very silent on the bad times. I think he saw and heard a lot more than he ever wanted to.

Yeah, my Great grandad wasn't graphic in his descriptions, but I would read other accounts of the battles he was in (Including the one he was killed at) and it really sounds like a horror movie.

I'm sure your great uncle saw things he would rather forget, doesn't surprise me that he wouldn't want to talk about them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think what concerns me is that world issues at present are very similar. There are hot spots all over the globe. I have the feeling we're about to engage in another WW.

I hope not

My great grandad being killed in that war set off a chain of events that affected my family in a highly negative fashion. Some of those repercussions are still felt to this day.

It wasn't worth it.

WW1 in particular, just pi$$ed all over the value of human life. That war did NOT need to happen.

I think another world war is unlikely, the type of weaponry available could destroy us all in a day,

If there was a WW3 it would probably last a day, and that would be the end of us all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My great grandfather fought for Austria, got captured by Russia, joined the revolutionaries in Russia, and then fled to Canada when it got out of control...the wisest decision of his life, I'm very thankful he decided to do so

I think what concerns me is that world issues at present are very similar. There are hot spots all over the globe. I have the feeling we're about to engage in another WW.

I think the world has learned from past wars that a world war is never a viable option, especially w/ nukes and such. There is no way that world leaders would be stupid enough to spark another global conflict.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think what concerns me is that world issues at present are very similar. There are hot spots all over the globe. I have the feeling we're about to engage in another WW.

The most shocking fact about war is that its victims and its instruments are individual human beings, and that these individual beings are condemned by the monstrous conventions of politics to murder or be murdered in quarrels not their own.

Aldous Huxley

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Last year I did some research because my family never really knew what happened to my great, great uncle. He went to war and never came back and that was about all we knew. I managed to find out when he died and where he is buried. Only yesterday I uncovered that he was originally buried by the enemy and was in that grave for 6 years before being exhumed and moved to Fontaine-Au-Pire Communal Cemetery. He died on 26 August 1914, just 22 days in to the war.

The Guardian has a great interactive piece up today if anyone is interested.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/ng-interactive/2014/jul/23/a-global-guide-to-the-first-world-war-interactive-documentary?CMP=fb_gu

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All respect to those who have fallen. What I don't understand is why are we celebrating the start of a war? Seems a little barbaric and bloodthirsty. Mourn for the dead yes, celebrate the war itself? Not so much. Seems to be more of a photo op for Harper.

Totally.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think what concerns me is that world issues at present are very similar. There are hot spots all over the globe. I have the feeling we're about to engage in another WW.

Im 47 now. In my lifetime there has ALWAYS been "hot spots". Right now it is pretty calm as major war tensions go. Sure Russia and Ukraine , China trying to intimidate over disputed territory but that type of thing has always been happening. The cold war during the 70s and 80s was serious. Reagan putting Krushchev and Andropov on alert that the US was back. Tense times in there. Right now things are pretty good by comparison. The threat of mutual annihilation has a great way of keeping the powers from getting too out of hand.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Im 47 now. In my lifetime there has ALWAYS been "hot spots". Right now it is pretty calm as major war tensions go. Sure Russia and Ukraine , China trying to intimidate over disputed territory but that type of thing has always been happening. The cold war during the 70s and 80s was serious. Reagan putting Krushchev and Andropov on alert that the US was back. Tense times in there. Right now things are pretty good by comparison. The threat of mutual annihilation has a great way of keeping the powers from getting too out of hand.

So things are common knowlege , many are not , I first learned about this in the late 90's

On January 25th 1995, a Norwegian science rocket was launched from the military base Andøya in northern Norway. The objective of the rocket was to collect information about the northern light.

Photo of the rocket during the launch:

Forskningsrakett_fr_191956c.jpg

However, when the Russian defence picked up the rocket on their radar, they sounded the alert. The reason was that the speed altitude and heading of the rocket matched their scenario of how a western nuclear attack would begin.

"From our scenarios, a nuclear strike would begin around Norway, before strategic nuclear missiles would be launched." This is what Maksim Sjingarkin tells the Norwegian television channel TV2. Maksim Sjingarkin was an officer in the top secret organisation which were in control of all of Russias nuclear weapons.

The incident was covered by the media world wide, but Sjingarkin is the first officer to tell the story of what happened on the inside this wintersday. He claims people are not aware of just how close we were to seing a nuclear war.

"This was much worse than the Cuba crisis. It was litterally a matter of minutes."

According to Maksim Sjingarkin, this incident was far more dangerous than the Cuba crisis, because in the 60s, there was a dialogue between the nations on the subject. In this case, there was no dialogue, because everything happend very fast, and unexpected.

Sjingarkin explains in detail how close we came to WWIII.

"Jeltsin had opened `the briefcase`, the keys were put in place, and a direct call was made to the US president. At the same time, nuclear missiles were prepared to be launched against the west. Jeltsin literally sat there with his finger on the trigger for awhile, considering whether to launch the counter attack or not.

One of the reasons the incident had a happy ending was that his fellow officers hesitated to get the Russian counter missiles ready for launch while the Norwegian rocket was airborne. When the officers were ordered to prepare the missiles to be launched, they faced such a serious moralic dilemma, that they simply were unable to follow orders."

As we now know, the situation was solved in the last minute, and no launch was made from Russia.

Maksim Sjingarkin left the armed forces as a Major in 2000. The incident has since made him realize just how horrific nuclear weapons are, and he is now working on reducing the number of nuclear devices worldwide.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...