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Enviro Disaster in Likely, BC as tailings pond breached at Mount Polley Mine


theminister

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Yeah, they'll probably blame an electrician, or a beaver dam.

Beaver dams are a significant problem in real life.

There will be some heads to roll and fines levied but the damage and the effort to clean it and what not I beleive is being vastly overestimated.

Yes, there's about 4 football fields worth of pontential hazmats. But I suspect the rest of the damage is no different than a large flood event and while there will be siltation and knocked over trees the enviroment will rebout quick quickly on it's on for the majority of the affected areas.

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i just read somewhere that an owner of the flames is a big investor in polley mines.

This disaster could have been avoided but that mine got greedy, they did not want to spend the money needed to reinforce the wall.

I understand that we need mining to exist, but I do not understand why they can't also protect our food and water sources while they do it. Yes we need our metal cars... but we also need food. Without control on industry they would gladly dump and kill all our waterways, kill off all the bees so that nothing can grow etc etc. If you don't care about eating and drinking then yah for sure let 'em have at er.

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With all due respect Ron you know that's crap.

When you have water bubbling, fish floating to the surface noxious smells and green sheen that large the water is not nor was it drinking water quality.

Unless you plan to take a glass like the president and previously Joe Oliver said they would, that's a pretty farcicle claim in the gave of the evidence and mounting eye witness accounts.

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With all due respect Ron you know that's crap.

When you have water bubbling, fish floating to the surface noxious smells and green sheen that large the water is not nor was it drinking water quality.

Unless you plan to take a glass like the president and previously Joe Oliver said they would, that's a pretty farcicle claim in the gave of the evidence and mounting eye witness accounts.

Thank You
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How is that one Stanley cup rioter who breaks 1 pan of glass spends 6 months in jail while supervisors and higher up managers of this mine do nothing to address a known problem which has ruined the environment up there get nothing but fat cheques?

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How is that one Stanley cup rioter who breaks 1 pan of glass spends 6 months in jail while supervisors and higher up managers of this mine do nothing to address a known problem which has ruined the environment up there get nothing but fat cheques?

Best guess, the billionares have better lawyers.

Not saying its right....but usually when decisions doesnt make sense, it most likely has to do with money.

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How is that one Stanley cup rioter who breaks 1 pan of glass spends 6 months in jail while supervisors and higher up managers of this mine do nothing to address a known problem which has ruined the environment up there get nothing but fat cheques?

Fat cheques......signed for by the government. So the root of your answer is really the mine manager doesn't get punished because the government is at fault even more for approving it. Then leaving it to the mines discretion. The government official who signed for this should be in prison for negligence. Hold the actual people who cause these problems accountable for their terrible decisions. That's the best way to prevent these kinds of things from happening again. Frustrating because it is very predictable and damaging but at the end of the day. You pay the government enough and they sign at the bottom, neither sides cares what happens next they're untouchable.

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One of your own links says a company faces $1 million in fines.. how is that getting away with it?

OK. When your net worth is in the billions of dollars and your take home after paying shareholders is still almost 3/4 of a billion dollars.

What exactly will $1 million in fines do as a deterrent?

The law enacted in 1999 allows for prison time of corporate heads and full monetary coverage of clean up abatement and mitigation. I like that route better. They were warned this would happen and actually increased the levels of the pond itself to unsafe levels after those warnings.

Prison does sound good. But I know that us tax payers will eat the cost of this in part or more.

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OK. When your net worth is in the billions of dollars and your take home after paying shareholders is still almost 3/4 of a billion dollars.

What exactly will $1 million in fines do as a deterrent?

The law enacted in 1999 allows for prison time of corporate heads and full monetary coverage of clean up abatement and mitigation. I like that route better. They were warned this would happen and actually increased the levels of the pond itself to unsafe levels after those warnings.

Prison does sound good. But I know that us tax payers will eat the cost of this in part or more.

"Allows for prison time" is that the same as mandatory prison? In your wording, doesn't sound like it.

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"Allows for prison time" is that the same as mandatory prison? In your wording, doesn't sound like it.

second, I will try to find the law.

edit**

I am not looking through that much legalise. But the law basically states that they can be charged and see jail time up to 3 years (if I recall) if found to have been negligent in the lead up to the disaster

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http://www.vancouversun.com/opinion/columnists/Barbara+Yaffe+reason+confident+environmental/10098486/story.html

Barbara Yaffe: No reason to be confident in environmental protection
Missteps give B.C. residents no reason to trust companies or government

Could there be a worse time in B.C. to have a tailings pond disaster?

Never mind that the salmon are spawning. A wee debate is taking place in this province about whether to sanction a pipeline to the coast and tanker transport of bitumen along B.C.’s coastline.

Albertans, hoping to get their petroleum to the West Coast, must be as distressed as British Columbians at the Aug. 4 breach of the Mount Polley tailings pond. Or they should be.

That is because this environmental catastrophe is bound to have a chilling effect on those in B.C. who otherwise might have been open to being convinced that — should Enbridge comply with the province’s five conditions and the 209 imposed by a federal review panel — well, maybe the job-generating Northern Gateway project would be worth the presumably diminished risk.

Not now. A slurry of metal-laden sand and waste water from that Imperial Metals tailings pond could well be mistaken for bitumen, with its greyish colour and ability to carry timber and other detritus along with it on its determined path.

This is what happens when goop mixes with water. A water ban, barring both drinking and bathing, was put in place in the vicinity of the breach and aboriginal fishers now fear for the season’s salmon run.

A Thursday press release issued by two aboriginal bands in the area had the piercing ring of an I-told-you-so message: “The Mount Polley tailings pond disaster ... should serve as a deafening wake-up call for all British Columbians,” said Loretta Williams, chief of the Williams Lake band and Bev Sellars, Soda Creek band chief.

“Our lasting economy is what swims by in the river and lakes, walks on and grows on the land and flies in the air — and this is what can be destroyed by a lust for the temporary dollars mining can provide.”

But the chiefs might just as well said “by a lust for the temporary dollars bitumen can provide.”

B.C. Mines Minister Bill Bennett has admitted: “I am losing sleep over this. This gives us about the best reason a person could have to really take a step back. Every Canadian has to be concerned about this.

“This will cause everyone in government across the country to re-examine policies.”

The disaster also will reaffirm a widespread belief that corporate entities — which always assure everyone that all necessary safeguards are in place — generally have profit, not safety, as their overwhelming priority. And that when a disaster happens a succession of mistakes usually can be traced back to the company bearing responsible for the mishap.

In this case, sure enough, Imperial Metals had ignored years of government warnings about the level of tailings pond waste water at its gold-copper mine near Likely. It received the latest of five warnings in May for exceeding the permitted height of waste water in the pond.

Also reaffirmed will be a suspicion government is not tough enough on resource development companies that do not play by the rules. In this case, why did B.C. allow Imperial Metals to keep operating through five warnings about its tailings pond?

And then there’s the 2011 report from environmental consultant Brian Olding which cited the tailings pond problem as well as the fact the company had no contingency plan for a tailings pond failure.

But these nuggets always emerge after, rather than before, a disaster.

Mistakes happen. But if issues are foreseen but neglected, if there’s inadequate oversight and no contingency plan, how confident should British Columbians be that the province’s environment is being adequately protected?

Not very.

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So far the water tests are showing that it was drinking water quality.

As noted this is not a disaster or a catastrophe. It's an incident and some cleanup will be required but as noted everything has been a great over reaction.

Thank you over the top environmentalists and anti corporate crusaders for helping to drive the stock price down and allow me to get in at a good price! (Already up 5%). ;)

Keep up the good work! You ARE making a difference! :P

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So far the water tests are showing that it was drinking water quality.

As noted this is not a disaster or a catastrophe. It's an incident and some cleanup will be required but as noted everything has been a great over reaction.

Thank you over the top environmentalists and anti corporate crusaders for helping to drive the stock price down and allow me to get in at a good price! (Already up 5%). ;)

Keep up the good work! You ARE making a difference! :P

They released tap water results not water in polley lake or Quesnel lake. But hopefully the Indians keep the mine down. :)

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Actually even if they close the mine it's really only a small portion of III. Only real risk of massive heavy metal contamination is no longer there. There is some, but it's manageable. And there's some damage, but it's not that massive. Sure, millions of dollars, maybe even tens of millions, but not hundreds of millions.

So even if the cleanup is tens of millions, and the mine is closed (bye bye 300 jobs in Likely, never mind the spinoffs), it's only one smaller mine in the companies holdings, so cutting off that appendage to save the body isn't the end of world.

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