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The Canadian Universities Thread


Mimerez

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Hey everyone,

I'm currently at that time in life, where I have to start applying to Universities and finish off my schooling. However, this has been rather difficult, because I don't really know much about any of the universities here, in Canada.

So tell me, what University did you go to? Were the teachers friendly? Was the experience a good one? Please, just let me know your experiences with your university in as much detail.

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It's hard to give any relevant advice about specific universities without knowing what faculty you're interested in.

Even then, just remember that undergraduate degrees are like elementary school diplomas in the long run. As long as you have one, that's all that matters. Don't worry too much about reputation and all that.

Well, Im more interested in the atmosphere, and general feel of the Universities.

Also, if what you said about Rep is true, than thats pretty awesome.

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Going to university is one thing. The game changer on the whole experience is if you are able to live on campus first year/off campus the years after that.

You will learn so much more living independently than you will from any textbook or professor. Honestly ,even if your parents are paying rent and all you're doing is paying for your personal expenses, you will still learn so much.

Based on my experience and the experience from those around me: it doesn't matter where you get that certificate, just don't live at home while going to university. You will regret it.

But if I had to preach, I'd say the Sauder School of Business at UBC ;) Great program, great school, great parties, great beaches, great city.

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There are 3 worthwhile campuses in Canada: UBC (Vancouver), UoT (Toronto), and McGill (Montreal).

There are some other decent ones, for example SFU in Burnaby, but those 3 are the best in Canada.

3 best at what?

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Going to university is one thing. The game changer on the whole experience is if you are able to live on campus first year/off campus the years after that.

You will learn so much more living independently than you will from any textbook or professor. Honestly ,even if your parents are paying rent and all you're doing is paying for your personal expenses, you will still learn so much.

Based on my experience and the experience from those around me: it doesn't matter where you get that certificate, just don't live at home while going to university. You will regret it.

But if I had to preach, I'd say the Sauder School of Business at UBC ;) Great program, great school, great parties, great beaches, great city.

I think I'd regret paying those extra tens of thousands of dollars more.

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I'm a 3rd-year Business student at UFV (University of the Fraser Valley), though it'll be my 4th year there starting this fall. Overall, I've enjoyed it, and it's seems to have been worth my money thus far (though we'll really find out once I graduate). The professors vary. If you're smart about it, you can choose good profs, and you'll have a decent time. If you don't make choosing good professors a priority, you'll probably have some very difficult and stressful classes.

At UFV, the university life isn't a very prevalent thing, though there are still some ways to get involved. We have a fairly small dormitory building that was fairly recently built. It mostly houses international students who don't have a place to live nearby.

As for cost, it's one of the biggest reasons I chose UFV. Generally, four 3-credit courses, plus other fees bring me to about $2000/semester. Add in $150/book on top of that and that should roughly be your cost. Extremely low cost for a university. If you choose a major that has more 4-credit courses, bear in mind that those cost a bit more.

Another benefit of UFV is the small class sizes. The classes usually max out at 36 students for popular classes, with many later classes only accepting roughly 20-25. This can make it a bit hard to get into classes sometimes, but it also allows for students to create closer relationships with profs, which can be useful for influencing their bias (perhaps grades?) and making your experience just generally more enjoyable. They may also come in handy as contacts in your future career.

That's about all that I have for now off the top of my head. Best of luck!

EDIT: After reading others' posts I have a bit more to add.

UFV isn't prestigious by any means, but it gets the job done. I know a friend in Business who got very high grades at UFV and as a result got a job at a top accounting firm in BC. He had loads of offers and options, so as long as you do well and pad your resume nicely with experience and work, you'll be fine regardless of which school you choose.

Also, while UFV isn't great in everything (it particularly sucks at music), it does have some specialties, most notably business and criminology. It also has a half-decent science program. There are many options in the business degree, such as accounting, finance, human-resource management, and marketing.

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I'm a 3rd-year Business student at UFV (University of the Fraser Valley), though it'll be my 4th year there starting this fall. Overall, I've enjoyed it, and it's seems to have been worth my money thus far (though we'll really find out once I graduate). The professors vary. If you're smart about it, you can choose good profs, and you'll have a decent time. If you don't make choosing good professors a priority, you'll probably have some very difficult and stressful classes.

At UFV, the university life isn't a very prevalent thing, though there are still some ways to get involved. We have a fairly small dormitory building that was fairly recently built. It mostly houses international students who don't have a place to live nearby.

As for cost, it's one of the biggest reasons I chose UFV. Generally, four 3-credit courses, plus other fees bring me to about $2000/semester. Add in $150/book on top of that and that should roughly be your cost. Extremely low cost for a university. If you choose a major that has more 4-credit courses, bear in mind that those cost a bit more.

Another benefit of UFV is the small class sizes. The classes usually max out at 36 students for popular classes, with many later classes only accepting roughly 20-25. This can make it a bit hard to get into classes sometimes, but it also allows for students to create closer relationships with profs, which can be useful for influencing their bias (perhaps grades?) and making your experience just generally more enjoyable. They may also come in handy as contacts in your future career.

That's about all that I have for now off the top of my head. Best of luck!

Extremely informative. Thanks a bunch, AJ!

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I'm a 3rd-year Business student at UFV (University of the Fraser Valley), though it'll be my 4th year there starting this fall. Overall, I've enjoyed it, and it's seems to have been worth my money thus far (though we'll really find out once I graduate). The professors vary. If you're smart about it, you can choose good profs, and you'll have a decent time. If you don't make choosing good professors a priority, you'll probably have some very difficult and stressful classes.

At UFV, the university life isn't a very prevalent thing, though there are still some ways to get involved. We have a fairly small dormitory building that was fairly recently built. It mostly houses international students who don't have a place to live nearby.

As for cost, it's one of the biggest reasons I chose UFV. Generally, four 3-credit courses, plus other fees bring me to about $2000/semester. Add in $150/book on top of that and that should roughly be your cost. Extremely low cost for a university. If you choose a major that has more 4-credit courses, bear in mind that those cost a bit more.

Another benefit of UFV is the small class sizes. The classes usually max out at 36 students for popular classes, with many later classes only accepting roughly 20-25. This can make it a bit hard to get into classes sometimes, but it also allows for students to create closer relationships with profs, which can be useful for influencing their bias (perhaps grades?) and making your experience just generally more enjoyable. They may also come in handy as contacts in your future career.

That's about all that I have for now off the top of my head. Best of luck!

EDIT: After reading others' posts I have a bit more to add.

UFV isn't prestigious by any means, but it gets the job done. I know a friend in Business who got very high grades at UFV and as a result got a job at a top accounting firm in BC. He had loads of offers and options, so as long as you do well and pad your resume nicely with experience and work, you'll be fine regardless of which school you choose.

Also, while UFV isn't great in everything (it particularly sucks at music), it does have some specialties, most notably business and criminology. It also has a half-decent science program. There are many options in the business degree, such as accounting, finance, human-resource management, and marketing.

Bollocks. Either you're insane or your program isn't like the CIS program where they make you take every other subject under the sun not related to CIS.

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Bollocks. Either you're insane or your program isn't like the CIS program where they make you take every other subject under the sun not related to CIS.

I haven't had to take much else that's unrelated. A few CMNS classes and some about 4 other electives. Other than that most are related, though some more than others. The impression I get is that the Business program is much more developed than the CIS program at UFV.

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Mind explaining? My cousin also told me it was bad, I just have no idea why

Where to begin...

- There is way too many Profs/TA's who cannot speak English at a level that you could actually converse with them or have them elaborate on something. Group projects can be an interesting issue as well for the same reason. (I'm sure these are issues anywhere, but I can't imagine it being any worse in another native English university).

- Almost zero atmosphere. The campus is dark and dreary, and there is rarely anything exciting going on. Most people just go up there for class then get off the mountain as quick as they can. If you want any sort of "Campus Lifestyle", SFU will disappoint the crap out of you. Believe me. I could handle SFU if the atmosphere wasn't so bloody depressing, but my god, it's just so depressing.

- Required classes for some programs are frequently running at the same time (often 3 or 4 of them), making it near impossible to actually take all the courses you need in a time effective manner for some majors. Also just had a class I registered for cancelled, they never had a prof to run it. By the time they let us know that they were no longer running the course, every other course I could have taken to replace it was full.

I could go on if necessary, but I really don't want to. It's starting to make me pissy.

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are you staying in BC? What are you studying?

UBC, obviously, is a larger, more heavily funded school, it offers medical doctorals, and has a huge campus and res from what I understand, so I think it's (by default of being in a 'community') a better option to live the typical University Experience compared to a place like SFU, which may be more of a commuter school (smaller/insignificant res/campus). Dunno if any of this actually means anything though, since you're basically in control of how social you are or are not

UVic is a good school for certain things. Has a few really great liberal arts programs, and a couple of science-y things as well. Very strong law school if that interests you. Lots of students live in the immediate surrounding area, so there's definitely a 'culture' there, although there are far, far better areas of Victoria to live

if you're reaching out a bit, McGill has a fabulous campus and is situated in one of the coolest neighbourhoods in Canada. Would be my #1 choice in Canada if Montreal wasn't such a drag.

University of Toronto is unbelievably nice, but I imagine it's expensive as hell to attend there.

A friend of mine is doing an advanced degree at Wilfred Laurier and loves it, but I have no idea about it at all

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