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More Canadians say they're living paycheque to paycheque


Grapefruits

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Honestly, in public school you can not pay attention to anything the teacher says and get an A as long as you have the textbook and any notes that are needed. Anything else you need help with you can find on the Internet.

Grades aren't the only things that you need a teacher for in your adolescent years. If you saw your teacher as someone whose sole purpose was to teach you the curriculum, there's your misunderstanding.

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LOL - nice "fake" post! Either that or your high school teacher was lying to you!

Yes, it's bad, seems just about everyone I know is struggling financially - myself included.

Well, they may not have been lying, depending on how much that particular teacher earned. According to statscan:

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l01/cst01/famil105a-eng.htm

To be in the top 15% of earners in Canada, you need to earn about $70K - $75K

Macleans magazine published a calculator a few years ago as well (albeit this calculator is from 2011):

http://www.macleans.ca/economy/economicanalysis/rank-your-income-where-do-you-stand-compared-to-the-rest-of-canada/

I understand of course that a new teacher would not be earning $70K per year. But published reports do show that with 10 years experience, average teacher salary is about $80K. So for this partuclar teacher, if they were in this range, they wouldn't necessarily be lying about where they fall compared to the average Canadian.

Now, having said all that, it's completely irrelevant to me. I don't care what someones salary is compared to a national average - what matters is, are they compensated fairly for what they do. It doesn't matter if that means they are in the top 10%, 50%, or whatever. Just compensate them appropriately.

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Well, they may not have been lying, depending on how much that particular teacher earned. According to statscan:

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l01/cst01/famil105a-eng.htm

To be in the top 15% of earners in Canada, you need to earn about $70K - $75K

Macleans magazine published a calculator a few years ago as well (albeit this calculator is from 2011):

http://www.macleans.ca/economy/economicanalysis/rank-your-income-where-do-you-stand-compared-to-the-rest-of-canada/

I understand of course that a new teacher would not be earning $70K per year. But published reports do show that with 10 years experience, average teacher salary is about $80K. So for this partuclar teacher, if they were in this range, they wouldn't necessarily be lying about where they fall compared to the average Canadian.

Now, having said all that, it's completely irrelevant to me. I don't care what someones salary is compared to a national average - what matters is, are they compensated fairly for what they do. It doesn't matter if that means they are in the top 10%, 50%, or whatever. Just compensate them appropriately.

Good find, thanks for that.

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Well, they may not have been lying, depending on how much that particular teacher earned. According to statscan:

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l01/cst01/famil105a-eng.htm

To be in the top 15% of earners in Canada, you need to earn about $70K - $75K

Macleans magazine published a calculator a few years ago as well (albeit this calculator is from 2011):

http://www.macleans.ca/economy/economicanalysis/rank-your-income-where-do-you-stand-compared-to-the-rest-of-canada/

I understand of course that a new teacher would not be earning $70K per year. But published reports do show that with 10 years experience, average teacher salary is about $80K. So for this partuclar teacher, if they were in this range, they wouldn't necessarily be lying about where they fall compared to the average Canadian.

Now, having said all that, it's completely irrelevant to me. I don't care what someones salary is compared to a national average - what matters is, are they compensated fairly for what they do. It doesn't matter if that means they are in the top 10%, 50%, or whatever. Just compensate them appropriately.

I've heard of some of these published reports and they include administrators salaries in there too (as many of them teach the odd class). I'd also assume this is Canada wide. Maybe I've been focused too much on the BC dispute because the average teacher in BC doesn't make close to 80K unless the average teacher has 10+ years of experience and has a masters degree.

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I'm 53 and I've been living paycheque to paycheque my entire life. I'm also one of those extremely rare people who does not own a cell phone.

I have a mortgage, a car payment and the usual monthly bills, but other than that I don't have too many expenses. No toys (RV, boat, ATV, snowmoblie, etc) I scrape together the $400 to play hockey every year and I go for a beer after work at the end of the week, but that's about it.

My other big expense is a 16 year old daughter who is heavily involved in figure skating. If you think hockey is expensive, you ain't seen nothing....

I'm guessing that I'll continue to live paycheque to paycheque until she graduates and moves out on her own. Of course, by then I'll be 55 with very little to retire on. Luckily, I'm a musician and plan to be gigging well into my 70's.... B)

I found this post very refreshing and honest. Too often I see people saying one thing but living another. Bravo for being honest and happy. A lot of happy people I know are living pay cheque to pay cheque. It's not optimal, but it's not evil.

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I've heard of some of these published reports and they include administrators salaries in there too (as many of them teach the odd class). I'd also assume this is Canada wide. Maybe I've been focused too much on the BC dispute because the average teacher in BC doesn't make close to 80K unless the average teacher has 10+ years of experience and has a masters degree.

Oh, totally agreed - if you re-read my post, I did state that the reports say that a teacher with 10+ years of experience has an average salary of $80K. Not that the average salary of all teachers is $80K.

Take this with a grain of salt, but here is a recent news story on the average salary of teachers in BC:

http://globalnews.ca/news/1346218/wage-comparison-how-b-c-teachers-salaries-rank-across-canada/

In any case, I dislike the use of averages, since as you say, it includes all teachers, of all experience levels. It isn't particularly meaningful, and averages can be spun in different ways by both sides to "make" their point. There are likely very few individual teachers who actually earn the "average salary" as it is calculated.

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I've heard of some of these published reports and they include administrators salaries in there too (as many of them teach the odd class). I'd also assume this is Canada wide. Maybe I've been focused too much on the BC dispute because the average teacher in BC doesn't make close to 80K unless the average teacher has 10+ years of experience and has a masters degree.

Teachers can make a maximum of around 74k in BC.

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Don't have to tell me know much it costs to have teenagers around. She on Facebook?

A lot more lately. A month ago, she stuck us with a $600 phone bill. Since she and her mom were on a family plan, the wife cancelled her service. She still has the phone, but it's basically a camera now.

Facebook is now her means of keeping in touch with her friends. It's loaded on the computer pretty much 24/7.

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I found this post very refreshing and honest. Too often I see people saying one thing but living another. Bravo for being honest and happy. A lot of happy people I know are living pay cheque to pay cheque. It's not optimal, but it's not evil.

Of course I'd be happier if I had more money, but I made my bed as the saying goes. ;) Thanks for the vote of confidence anyway...
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A lot more lately. A month ago, she stuck us with a $600 phone bill. Since she and her mom were on a family plan, the wife cancelled her service. She still has the phone, but it's basically a camera now.

Facebook is now her means of keeping in touch with her friends. It's loaded on the computer pretty much 24/7.

Does she have an after school job? A pre-paid phone plan sounds like a good idea for her.

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How do you get a $600 phone bill on a family share plan? Aren't they all infinite nationwide minutes/texts now?

Not even with streaming Netflix over data can I see someone racking up that much. At least, not fast enough to not notice, and believe me, with a teen it would be daily checks of my Telus app to make sure I don't have a $600 bill to deal with.

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Wow, just looked it up & I'm in the top 10%. But with an acerage, vehicle and kids it sure don't feel like it. I guess a buck just don't stretch as far these days.

It's about utility.

I dunno what you looked at to get your percentage (I haven't bothered), but I make quite a bit myself.

As we make more, we justify spending more on less-essential things.

This is where discipline and for people like me who invest (which is why my wife is in real estate) and save retain some of the semblance of "delaying gratification" come in handy. It's easier to be out of control when you aren't living cheque to cheque.

While I didn't learn much at all from my MIL, the way she saved money and exemplified delaying gratification would be a crash course most Americans and Canadians need (more-so Americans). She made a whopping 30k a year yet has absolutely immaculate credit and was given a mortgage for a huge 450k house (years ago) because of her ability to save. One just has to retain that mentality even when making more. It's very hard, but more than do-able.

North Americans are taught when finances are tough, rather than reduce spending/utility and living tough for a while, you take out credit to justify spending and consumption that's unaffordable. Of course, this is also reflected in government policies too. Most people, due to their giving in to desire of having the newest trinket, when they can't afford it, don't learn, and then they want people like me to pay more taxes to fund their financial stupidity when they need government assistance.

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