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Taiwan drills for Chinese invasion


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Taiwanese fighter jets land on highway in ‘China attack’ war games

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A Taiwan Air Force US-made F-16 fighter jet takes off from a highway during the annual Han Kuang military exercise in Chiayi County

Taiwan displayed how its fighter jets and early-warning aircraft could land, refuel and take off on a closed motorway yesterday in a scenario simulating a mainland attack that wiped out the island's air force bases.

The exercise, the first of its kind since 2011, was a reminder of lingering mainland hostilities towards the island despite warming ties between the two rivals.

"The scenario of the drill was that the air bases were severely damaged after intensive bombings of ballistic and cruise missiles by the Chinese communists," Major General Hung Kuang-min said.

Three jet fighters, an F-16, a Mirage 2000-5 and a home-made Indigenous Defence Fighter, practised landing on a freeway in southern Chiayi county, where they refuelled and loaded missiles and other ammunition before taking off again. The armed F-16 jet took off after it was loaded with AIM-120 advanced medium-range air-to-air missiles and the Indigenous Defence Fighter and the Mirage fighter did the same after they were loaded with AIM-9P4 Sidewinder missiles and MICA air-to-air missiles, the Central News Agency cited the Air Force as saying.

The manoeuvres were the first to feature an E-2K, a US-made early warning aircraft. About 1,200 soldiers were mobilised for the drill, part of war games codenamed "Han Kuang 30" which were designed to evaluate the island's ability to defend itself against a mainland invasion.

Ties between Taiwan and the mainland have improved markedly since 2008 after Ma Ying-jeou of the Beijing-friendly Kuomintang party came to power on a platform of increasing tourism and trade links. He was re-elected in 2012.

But Beijing still refuses to renounce its use of force against Taiwan should the island declare formal independence. Taiwan and the mainland split in 1949 at the end of a civil war.

http://www.scmp.com/news/china/article/1593763/taiwanese-fighter-jets-land-highway-china-attack-war-games

Beijing’s hard line on Hong Kong chills Taiwan-China relations

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Taiwan’s highly educated and qualified young graduates are angry over the lack of well-paying jobs or even suitable employment as government-protected industrialists take their factories ...

China’s heavy-handed rejection of universal suffrage in Hong Kong is threatening to derail the already wobbly economic relations between Beijing and Taiwan.

Beijing’s decision to only allow Hongkongers to elect their governor, the chief executive, from a list of candidates carefully vetted for their loyalty to the Chinese Communist Party has confirmed the worst fears in fiercely democratic Taiwan.

Even Taiwan’s President Ma Ying-jeou, who has pushed through a series of measures aimed at thawing the 60-year deep freeze in cross-strait economic and political relations since he came to power in 2008, has had to bow to public opinion and take a brusque attitude towards Beijing. Hong Kong’s drive for democracy and to maintain the rule of law will “receive the full backing of the Taiwanese,” Ma said after Beijing announced its verdict.

Taiwan’s relations with Beijing were already on a slippery slope because the island’s 23 million people are deeply suspicious that Ma, whose popularity rating is only just into double figures, intends to extend economic deals with Beijing into talks aimed at some form of political union. Nearly 90% of Taiwanese want to keep their independence.

Last month Ma fired his chief policymaker on China and one of the top negotiators with Beijing on suspicion that Beijing had recruited him as a spy.

Beijing’s apparent betrayal of its best friend in Taiwan has put Ma firmly on the defensive, especially over the latest economic deal with China, intended to lower market barriers in 144 service industry categories including banking, tourism and health care. This deal has already excited popular outrage, and members of parliament avoided addressing it in a special summer session. The agreement is likely to be shelved until at least after local elections in November, when voters will have the opportunity to give a verdict on Ma’s Kuomintang party ahead of national elections in 2016.

But the speculation in Taiwan is that the deal is so unpopular it is probably dead. In March and April thousands of student-led protesters occupied parliament, the Legislative Yuan, demanding clause-by-clause examination of the agreement, which they said gives China too much influence over Taiwan’s economy. The members of what has become known as the Sunflower Movement are also outraged by the results of the 20 economic agreements the Ma administration has signed with Beijing so far. These have opened up cross-straits contact, trade and investment for the first time since the Communists took over in China in 1949 and Taiwan became an independent nation. But they have also brought that most pernicious of imports for those who trade with China: growing disparity between the very wealthy and the rest. Taiwan’s highly educated and qualified young graduates are angry over the lack of well-paying jobs or even suitable employment as government-protected industrialists take their factories and investment to China.

For Beijing, the fallout from its Hong Kong decision is a major setback in its campaign to achieve sovereignty over Taiwan, which it claims to own. The “one country, two systems” formula by which Hong Kong was returned by Britain to Chinese rule in 1997 with a guarantee that it would keep autonomy for 50 years was intended to lure Taiwan into a similar agreement. That bait has been accompanied by decades of blackmail by Beijing in which it insists that countries such as Canada, the United States and those of the European Union can only have access to the Chinese market if they limit their relations with Taiwan.

So Taiwanese have always been suspicious of Beijing’s true objectives, and the rejection of democracy in Hong Kong, accompanied by a crackdown on freedom of expression, has only confirmed those fears.

http://www.biv.com/article/2014/9/beijings-hard-line-hong-kong-chills-taiwan-china-r/

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With China now claiming gas reserves in the hotly contested South China Sea I think this will be a foregone conclusion. China has watched as the world basically wrote Russia a stern letter which has basically been all but re-written with winter coming and Russian gas needed so vitally in the western European theater.

They should be wary they should be alert and they should be ready because without a doubt China will do what ti wants when it wants and laugh at the stern letter the world sends it because honestly...China is the worlds factory, it can just say no and destroy the economy for a full year or two

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Taiwan could beat china

Would not happen. Yes, Taiwan has mandatory military training for all men, but that's not enough.

And yes, Taiwan-China relations are currently not as sour as they could be. They are generally more chummy when KMT is in power anyway.

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With China now claiming gas reserves in the hotly contested South China Sea I think this will be a foregone conclusion. China has watched as the world basically wrote Russia a stern letter which has basically been all but re-written with winter coming and Russian gas needed so vitally in the western European theater.

They should be wary they should be alert and they should be ready because without a doubt China will do what ti wants when it wants and laugh at the stern letter the world sends it because honestly...China is the worlds factory, it can just say no and destroy the economy for a full year or two

If multinationals can't get their products made in China, they will find some other poverty stricken work force in another craphole country to make their widgets.

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I always believed it was a bad idea to help China to develop technologically.

20-30 years back, military simulations has China taking out Taiwan after like many many months of fighting, without US or any East Asian interference. Now, simulations has it pegged at like half a month.

While the US has some defensive alliance to protect the ROC, I'm not sure of them actually going out to enforce it. Possible scenario:

1. China launches naval/air strikes to soften up Taiwan...... massive air battles, etc.

2. Outright invasion, with UN calling for peace. US sending in their 7th Fleet to intervene. Takes a few days.

3. China launches missiles to disable US carriers, thus limiting their project powers. Meanwhile bombing of Okinawa/Guam to eliminate US airforce bases.

4. US turns around, Japan doesn't do anything without US backing. Taiwan surrenders.

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I always believed it was a bad idea to help China to develop technologically.

20-30 years back, military simulations has China taking out Taiwan after like many many months of fighting, without US or any East Asian interference. Now, simulations has it pegged at like half a month.

While the US has some defensive alliance to protect the ROC, I'm not sure of them actually going out to enforce it. Possible scenario:

1. China launches naval/air strikes to soften up Taiwan...... massive air battles, etc.

2. Outright invasion, with UN calling for peace. US sending in their 7th Fleet to intervene. Takes a few days.

3. China launches missiles to disable US carriers, thus limiting their project powers. Meanwhile bombing of Okinawa/Guam to eliminate US airforce bases.

4. US turns around, Japan doesn't do anything without US backing. Taiwan surrenders.

The US will not go to war with a nuclear superpower. Sorry Taiwan, been nice knowing ya

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