Jump to content
The Official Site of the Vancouver Canucks
Canucks Community

Vancouver City Restricting the Right to Protest


Lancaster

Recommended Posts

I'm more concerned that the Chinese Consulate bought land at the corner of Granville, and despite city regulations on cutting trees, just clear cut the lot so they could expand.

The issue is the protesters had a small shack on the sidewalk where they would have a person occupying it 24/7, and protected them for the elements. I don't have the right to put a structure where ever I feel like. The protesters should be allowed to have their say.

They just are not allowed to put up tents, a shack on the sidewalk in front of the consulate.

That's what a protest is sometimes, you're in locations you're not supposed to. Occupy was allowed to camp out in downtown. Sometimes people protest within lobbies and stuff, clearly private property.

In this case, it's public property. The City of Vancouver is just trying to find some technicality to remove the protest. I can understand if they are being destructive or hostile to the public, but they're a collection of middle-aged women just practicing their beliefs and handing out information, with a little shack to maintain their 24/7 vigil.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 things I disagree with here:

-there's no such thing as a permanent structure; all structures decay

-there's no such thing as public land; all land is controlled, in this country at least

But, if you are to assume that this land is public, then anyone and everyone should be able to build a structure on it. This structure didn't decay, it was removed. So it becomes a matter of the why - why was it removed and why can't they build another there?

That's a lot of semantics there, when clearly the definition we all know and understand fits the reason why it could be and was taken down.

That's what a protest is sometimes, you're in locations you're not supposed to. Occupy was allowed to camp out in downtown. Sometimes people protest within lobbies and stuff, clearly private property.

In this case, it's public property. The City of Vancouver is just trying to find some technicality to remove the protest. I can understand if they are being destructive or hostile to the public, but they're a collection of middle-aged women just practicing their beliefs and handing out information, with a little shack to maintain their 24/7 vigil.

Those weren't permanent structures though, just tents and the like. Those can be taken down any time pretty quickly, where if you wanted to build a shed, gazebo or outhouse then it'd be permanent.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How is this restricting the right protest? It's restricting the ability to protest but not the right. Once we start allowing certain interest groups an advantage over others we are setting a precedent. I'm very critical of the Chinese government and I believe the Falun Gong have every right to protest, but there is a lot of injustice in the world and each group should have the same rights. I do not think a permanent structure is warranted.

I'm all for fighting injustice, but IMO not allowing the protesters a permanent structure is the wrong fight to choose.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

falun_gong_0.jpg

Definitely very sympathetic to their cause, but that is a major structure. As others have said if every protest group could do that, it'd be a disaster.

My guess is the structure steadily grew over time too.

li-bc-110420-falun-gong.jpg

4380.10018501_h9541369.jpg?w=300

if this "structure" gets caught on fire and the person inside is trapped and dies...

gotta say, it's pretty ugly tho - I definitely wouldn't want that on my lawn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...