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UBC's Vantage College: Canadians need not apply


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No and i would agree with that. But sometimes its always easier to be part of your own crowd.

I think another way of looking at it would be, if their intention is too study here and eventually go back, from their point of view, integrating may not be a priority.

But then why go to school here? There are schools that are as good or even better than UBC in Asia. If their intention was to come here and not properly learn the language, why bother coming at all? I'm sure tuition wouldn't be nearly as high back home.

For the record, I am also an immigrant and naturalized Canadian citizen (have been for 15 years now). It is absolutely frustrating to see people immigrate here and not bother to try and integrate. This isn't the 1900's. The support system is there; use it, there are no excuses.

BTW, drummer4now, I highly doubt UBC eventually accommodated the 200 students that were displaced. I am assuming the article meant that there were 200 less residence spots for domestic/regular stream students. The wait list to live in UBC res has traditionally been very long.

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But then why go to school here? There are schools that are as good or even better than UBC in Asia. If their intention was to come here and not properly learn the language, why bother coming at all? I'm sure tuition wouldn't be nearly as high back home.

BTW, drummer4now, I highly doubt UBC eventually accommodated the 200 students that were displaced. I am assuming the article meant that there were 200 less residence spots for domestic/regular stream students. The wait list to live in UBC res has traditionally been very long.

I can only assume its the experience of another country but integration is another issue.

Again, its probably just me being weak lol

Also, you can tell everyone back in China that you went to the "U.B.C"

Apart of me just isn't sure about throwing in judgments but i don't know.

As for the second point, i couldn't assume what the reason would be...although i will say this. A computer professor of mine, her daughter studied in Germany without knowing how to speak German. I'm guessing people do this all the time...

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But then why go to school here? There are schools that are as good or even better than UBC in Asia. If their intention was to come here and not properly learn the language, why bother coming at all? I'm sure tuition wouldn't be nearly as high back home.

For the record, I am also an immigrant and naturalized Canadian citizen (have been for 15 years now). It is absolutely frustrating to see people immigrate here and not bother to try and integrate. This isn't the 1900's. The support system is there; use it, there are no excuses.

BTW, drummer4now, I highly doubt UBC eventually accommodated the 200 students that were displaced. I am assuming the article meant that there were 200 less residence spots for domestic/regular stream students. The wait list to live in UBC res has traditionally been very long.

if you read the article on the wait list for students its 5200 people and residence costs are going up 20%

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Welcome to Hongcouver.

The white man/woman will be the visible minority within a few yrs if not already. Was at Metrotown food court the other day and I could count the whites I saw on one hand. And before anyone freaks out, Im just stating the obvious. Not making any judgment towards any race. It is what it is.

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Welcome to Hongcouver.

The white man/woman will be the visible minority within a few yrs if not already. Was at Metrotown food court the other day and I could count the whites I saw on one hand. And before anyone freaks out, Im just stating the obvious. Not making any judgment towards any race. It is what it is.

That's kind of funny lol...and true however

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Welcome to Hongcouver.

The white man/woman will be the visible minority within a few yrs if not already. Was at Metrotown food court the other day and I could count the whites I saw on one hand. And before anyone freaks out, Im just stating the obvious. Not making any judgment towards any race. It is what it is.

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But then why go to school here? There are schools that are as good or even better than UBC in Asia. If their intention was to come here and not properly learn the language, why bother coming at all? I'm sure tuition wouldn't be nearly as high back home.

For the record, I am also an immigrant and naturalized Canadian citizen (have been for 15 years now). It is absolutely frustrating to see people immigrate here and not bother to try and integrate. This isn't the 1900's. The support system is there; use it, there are no excuses.

BTW, drummer4now, I highly doubt UBC eventually accommodated the 200 students that were displaced. I am assuming the article meant that there were 200 less residence spots for domestic/regular stream students. The wait list to live in UBC res has traditionally been very long.

I actually lived with an international student for one semester, and I asked him why did he come here?

He said that most Universities and colleges in Asia aren't as accredited like they're here. If someone has a degree from the western world it increases their chances of getting a decent job. He also said that the degree itself doesn't really matter as along as you can gain admission. The most popular programs according to him are Economics, Business, and Psychology for international students from Asia. Long story short they basically come here for the piece of paper as according to him the grades don't really matter either... Which seems to be true considering how hell-bent Asian countries are trying to westernize (China).

Also aside from the academic side, most Asian parents prefer their students go abroad as it gives them a chance to not babysit them and the student gets a mini trip out of it..

Essentially they don't care about learning the language or customs because they have no intentions of staying here after.. My roommate actually cared though because he planned on staying in Canada for the whole 4 years.

This is really no different from someone studying abroad in other countries. I highly doubt people make the effort to learn the local language there unless they plan on living or spending large amounts of time.

Most schools abroad are english only nowadays anyway.

I can't get into UBC with an 89% average, yet some international student who can't speak English gets to go to some special college so they can get in.

Freakin' joke.

Don't blame the player blame the system..

Same stuff happens abroad.

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This would be a lot less aggravating if I had seen examples of how pandering to rich foreign kids was making education more accessible to lower-income groups in our own society. Institutions such as these just reinforce that higher education is for the rich - and if Canada doesn't have enough money we'll take some other country's entitled elite instead.

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Welcome to Hongcouver.

The white man/woman will be the visible minority within a few yrs if not already. Was at Metrotown food court the other day and I could count the whites I saw on one hand. And before anyone freaks out, Im just stating the obvious. Not making any judgment towards any race. It is what it is.

I live in the Metrotown area, and with all the new condos going up around this area and all the rich Asians putting there money from overseas into these buildings, don't be surprised when the next time you come to Metrotown, you'll confuse the place with Richmond.

And why are people complaining about the fact that immigrants aren't integrating into "Canadian" society. "Canadian" society is a fragmented one from the start, and always has been since immigrants have been coming into the country. Do you really expect a person who can't speak English to start actively conversing and interacting with a group of white people? The fragmentation of Vancouver is the driving force for our distinct neighbourhoods and allows different cultures to flourish and develop on their own.

On another note...we are far from having white people as a visible minority. Give me a break people, once you drive past Cambie, you'll see tons of white people. The same goes for when you cross the Lions Gate/Second Narrows or when you drive past North Road deep into Coquitlam. English will always be the dominant language here, some of you people need to stop sensationalizing the potential issues Vancouver may or may not have with immigrants.

The only reason immigrants (Asians) are running to UBC is because of the amount of prestige you get back home. I swear, you'll be treated like a god in Asia if you can speak English and say you went to a school in North America. Plus, UBC has done a lot of work in connecting with universities overseas (UBC has a good exchange program), so things like Vantage College are probably there to strengthen those connections. It's unfortunate that money is the principle motivator for this catering, but when you have increasing enrolment, funding cuts, and rising costs, someone is going to be unhappy, and unfortunately domestic students (including myself) are going to be footing the bill even more this time.

I still find it stupid how UBC has spent so much money on useless landscaping when that could have been redirected to well you know, learning? The primary thing a university is responsible for. But then again, when I look at my friends who are going to schools in the states, I sometimes smile at the amount of tuition I'm paying to UBC.

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To be honest, a degree from a Chinese institution isn't worth the paper it's written on. As someone who was teaching English at a government-run high school, I can assure you that the level of English was appalling, with many students unable to put together an entire sentence. Written homework was even more of a group activity than it is in our high school system; it was at the point where it wasn't worth the effort to assign anything and save myself the effort of marking 40 incorrectly plagiarized assignments.

Even the domestically trained English teachers were consistently making numerous grammatical errors in daily conversation.

Further, the school administration felt the need to ensure that all the students advanced to the next level. When half these little geniuses failed an intentionally easy final exam, I was asked to change their grades so they not only passed, but appeared to have excelled. I declined and coincidentally was let go after the semester ended.

These students make Bure to Mogilny look like a Pulitzer winner.

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To be honest, a degree from a Chinese institution isn't worth the paper it's written on. As someone who was teaching English at a government-run high school, I can assure you that the level of English was appalling, with many students unable to put together an entire sentence. Written homework was even more of a group activity than it is in our high school system; it was at the point where it wasn't worth the effort to assign anything and save myself the effort of marking 40 incorrectly plagiarized assignments.

Even the domestically trained English teachers were consistently making numerous grammatical errors in daily conversation.

Further, the school administration felt the need to ensure that all the students advanced to the next level. When half these little geniuses failed an intentionally easy final exam, I was asked to change their grades so they not only passed, but appeared to have excelled. I declined and coincidentally was let go after the semester ended.

These students make Bure to Mogilny look like a Pulitzer winner.

Well said.. This what I meant by not accredited as in low standards.

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To be honest, a degree from a Chinese institution isn't worth the paper it's written on. As someone who was teaching English at a government-run high school, I can assure you that the level of English was appalling, with many students unable to put together an entire sentence. Written homework was even more of a group activity than it is in our high school system; it was at the point where it wasn't worth the effort to assign anything and save myself the effort of marking 40 incorrectly plagiarized assignments.

Even the domestically trained English teachers were consistently making numerous grammatical errors in daily conversation.

Further, the school administration felt the need to ensure that all the students advanced to the next level. When half these little geniuses failed an intentionally easy final exam, I was asked to change their grades so they not only passed, but appeared to have excelled. I declined and coincidentally was let go after the semester ended.

These students make Bure to Mogilny look like a Pulitzer winner.

Having flirted with the idea of teaching overseas myself I'll admit these kinds of horror stories stayed my hand.

That being said, I suppose I could've just gone with the flow and had a nice little trip.

Also, I've heard of similar pressures in private schools in BC. Could be emphasized or even fabricated by my public-school network though.

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Having flirted with the idea of teaching overseas myself I'll admit these kinds of horror stories stayed my hand.

That being said, I suppose I could've just gone with the flow and had a nice little trip.

Also, I've heard of similar pressures in private schools in BC. Could be emphasized or even fabricated by my public-school network though.

It was a fun trip overall; the amount of actual work I had to do was very minimal and I got to travel around the country. Just don't go in thinking you'll make a huge difference in the students' lives and you're good to go.

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It was a fun trip overall; the amount of actual work I had to do was very minimal and I got to travel around the country. Just don't go in thinking you'll make a huge difference in the students' lives and you're good to go.

Fair enough - maybe I will get around to it eventually! Good to hear it was enjoyable at least... I wonder if the Admin changed the grades after they "let you go."

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Bringing in international students is all about money. The article mentions how much international students pay for tuition. Theoretically that means domestic students pay less...I have plenty of doubts about whether that actually happens or not considering the massive amounts of bureaucracy in the university system.

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Well said.. This what I meant by not accredited as in low standards.

I also want to mention that for me it was the same attitude back in highschool. Majority was always talking about UBC.

As painful as it may be, it was mostly Asians and most mentioned business. I kid you not...lol

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Fair enough - maybe I will get around to it eventually! Good to hear it was enjoyable at least... I wonder if the Admin changed the grades after they "let you go."

Guaranteed. It was very much a "change them or we'll change them for you" kind of discussion. As someone whose parents were both excellent teachers, that didn't sit right for me.

That kind of enabling not only lets some real idiots progress if their parents pay up, it promotes the appalling work habits that have been previously discussed in this thread. I'd be very much in favour of an entrance exam administered by the university once the prospective student arrives. Charge a significant portion of the tuition fee to sit the exam. 2 chances to pass in order to be able to start your program. Fail both, and go back home.

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To be honest, a degree from a Chinese institution isn't worth the paper it's written on. As someone who was teaching English at a government-run high school, I can assure you that the level of English was appalling, with many students unable to put together an entire sentence. Written homework was even more of a group activity than it is in our high school system; it was at the point where it wasn't worth the effort to assign anything and save myself the effort of marking 40 incorrectly plagiarized assignments.

Even the domestically trained English teachers were consistently making numerous grammatical errors in daily conversation.

Further, the school administration felt the need to ensure that all the students advanced to the next level. When half these little geniuses failed an intentionally easy final exam, I was asked to change their grades so they not only passed, but appeared to have excelled. I declined and coincidentally was let go after the semester ended.

These students make Bure to Mogilny look like a Pulitzer winner.

First of all, good on you. Second, ouch...

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I actually lived with an international student for one semester, and I asked him why did he come here?

He said that most Universities and colleges in Asia aren't as accredited like they're here. If someone has a degree from the western world it increases their chances of getting a decent job. He also said that the degree itself doesn't really matter as along as you can gain admission. The most popular programs according to him are Economics, Business, and Psychology for international students from Asia. Long story short they basically come here for the piece of paper as according to him the grades don't really matter either... Which seems to be true considering how hell-bent Asian countries are trying to westernize (China).

Also aside from the academic side, most Asian parents prefer their students go abroad as it gives them a chance to not babysit them and the student gets a mini trip out of it..

Essentially they don't care about learning the language or customs because they have no intentions of staying here after.. My roommate actually cared though because he planned on staying in Canada for the whole 4 years.

This is really no different from someone studying abroad in other countries. I highly doubt people make the effort to learn the local language there unless they plan on living or spending large amounts of time.

Most schools abroad are english only nowadays anyway.

Don't blame the player blame the system..

Same stuff happens abroad.

The one part i feel like i should extend is that, this system was created by the greed of individuals. And that we are paying or playing their game.

The hard part is getting people angry enough to do something about it. People tend to just accept the status quo.

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