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35 minutes ago, Vanisleryan said:

Nice .62 is just about a 3 bagger now. Keep an eye for a good spot to buy CGC if thats the plan....On August 24th is the deadline for the government to make changes to the MMPR as ordered by the judge back in February for the Allard case. Major changes are expected regarding the distribution of medical marijuana. Wide speculation is possibly pharmacies. Also they will most likely set limits and regulations for any patients wanting to home grow small amounts. Canopy just did a bought deal today at 3.65 so I doubt it goes lower than that. GL

Yea it's something I'm curious about but it can go either way kind of junior companies are a risk, but if you get in cheap enough it's not bad. One that's surprised me and I just got in on recently is PIH. It seems to have constantly risen. I wish I would have got in sooner.

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21 minutes ago, Standing_Tall#37 said:

Yea it's something I'm curious about but it can go either way kind of junior companies are a risk, but if you get in cheap enough it's not bad. One that's surprised me and I just got in on recently is PIH. It seems to have constantly risen. I wish I would have got in sooner.

Yeah I wish Id gotten in earlier on a lot of stocks. Your right there is always risk involved. I do think that the stigma and sentiment around marijuana, especially medically is radically changing these days though. More doctors are getting on board, even at a global level. Canopy just signed an agreement to supply pharmacies in Germany. They also just up listed to the TSE.

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On 8/9/2016 at 2:12 AM, Curmudgeon said:

Just a few thoughts from a long time investor. Widely diversified. Moderate risk.

 

1. Ask yourself why are you wanting to invest. Are you looking to play the market like it was a kind of casino game? Are you investing a significant chunk of your income with the expectation that because you never really had the money, you won't miss it while it stays invested and grows? Experience talking: You can't consistently time the market, so your goal of buying low and selling high will be hit and miss due to the dark magic of volatility. Volatility is a technical term, but for our purposes, consider that it means the market soars and plunges for no frickin reason, at any time. If you want to gamble, go to a casino or play online poker. Your odds are about the same and you'll have more fun doing it. Plus you won't have to pay commission.

 

2. If you want to invest for the long term, go to a respected investment firm. Ask around for recommendations and search online for firms in your area. A good investment firm does not try to sell you particular products. They will recommend certain stocks, bonds, preferreds, ETFs and mutual funds but you decide which ones you will invest in. You will pay an advisor to manage your accounts, which can include sheltered accounts like TFSAs and RRSPs and RESPs if you are saving for your kids' education, and straight investment accounts, which are not tax-sheltered. Your advisor will work with you to devise a balanced portfolio so you don't put all of your money into high-risk stocks. Is it worth it to pay somebody to manage your investments? Absolutely. These people do this every day, they know the markets and they know how to balance a portfolio according to your needs, your age, your goals and your tolerance for risk.

 

3. Mutual Funds are not your best option because of the relatively low return that is mostly eaten up by high managment fees. ETFs (exhange traded funds) are very similar to mutuals, but are bought and sold like stocks and have a far lower management fee. There are a lot of good ETFs that cover various indexes or sectors. You can buy ETFs that track the S&P500 or bond funds or metals or technology and on and on. Some investors hold six or eight different ETFs that cover most of the stock market, albeit ony fractional pieces, but the risk is spread out and a rising market raises most stocks, so your returns are modest, but reasonably steady.

 

4. If you must buy common stocks, buy solid, blue chip companies that pay dividends, which is an amount per share paid to you just for owning the stock. Over the years, that annual 200 or 300 dollars adds up. You might also consider DRIP (dividend re-investment plan) stocks that pay you in additional stock rather than cash. I prefer the cash, but you may not.

 

5. If you must buy stocks, ask yourself if you'd be happy holding on to it for five or ten years. This will get you past the impulse to buy a stock because the company is about to come out with the latest and greatest new thing. A lot of folks deeply regret buying Blackberry stock at the height of the Crackberry craze or Sirius when it was $50 (now just over $4) or Nokia at over $50 when today it is barely over $5. That's why boring things like Kraft-Heinz, Proctor and Gamble, Microsoft and most Canadian banks are steady, reliable and will be in business for a long time, as will their dividends.

 

6. Max out your TFSAs but realize that you probably can do better than the 1% or 2% you would be getting for depositing it at your friendly bank or credit union. You can hold stocks, bonds, mutual funds, ETFs and even bullion in your TFSA. That money has been taxed already so it will never be taxed again, no matter how much you earn on your TFSA investment. If your income is temporarily lower, you likely won't need the tax shelter of an RRSP, so you are better off to top up your TFSA. RRSP's start making sense when you are paying a moderate or high rate of income tax, because you can reduce your taxable income now by deferring tax until later, when you have retired and your taxable income is probably lower. Your advisor can explain the details.

 

7. The US dollar exchange rate really hits hard when you want to buy stocks on the New York markets. Some companies have a Canadian listing on the Toronto Stock Exchange, so you can pay Canadian dollars for stock in the same company, although the price will be adjusted to its American value expressed in Canadian funds. On the plus side, once a stock begins to make money, or pays a dividend, that will also be in US funds, adding roughly 30% to the Canadian total.

 

If you have read this far, good for you for persisting. I am not a financial expert and have no connections to any investment firms, other than the one whose services I employ. Don't mean to sound preachy, but I wish someone had told me some of these things when I started out investing.

 

 

Good advice. However, your approach is strictly from a long term value investing point. 

 

Nothing wrong with day or swing trading if you have the knowledge, practice/experience and mental capacity and fortitude to do so.

 

The beauty of day trading, at least in my opinion, is you can get out as easily as you got in if you don't like what you are seeing. Most people don't however, so it's a mute point, but I think you get what I am trying to say.

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TFSA is not protected from tax in the US. Depending on how the TFSA is set up by the financial institution and what it is comprised of (mutual funds, stocks, cash, etc.) there may be further US reporting obligations and stiff penalties if you fail to comply to them.

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On 8/15/2016 at 11:39 AM, Tanev said:

TFSA is not protected from tax in the US. Depending on how the TFSA is set up by the financial institution and what it is comprised of (mutual funds, stocks, cash, etc.) there may be further US reporting obligations and stiff penalties if you fail to comply to them.

That sucks, but good to know. Thank you for your reply

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  • 5 months later...
On 2016-08-08 at 6:39 PM, Vanisleryan said:

Yeah I wish Id gotten in earlier on a lot of stocks. Your right there is always risk involved. I do think that the stigma and sentiment around marijuana, especially medically is radically changing these days though. More doctors are getting on board, even at a global level. Canopy just signed an agreement to supply pharmacies in Germany. They also just up listed to the TSE.

I have just bought into a few Marijuana stocks (Aurora ACB.CN & Cronos Group MJN.V) and they have treated me very well over the past couple of months. You mentioned Canopy which has been on absolute fire since you first posted this. It has quadrupled in about 6 months. I have been following but am waiting/hoping for a bit of a drop off before I get in. It is currently at $12.

 

I think it is going to be interesting once it is legalized and some major companies (likely tobacco) start muscling their way into the industry.

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18 minutes ago, I.Am.Ironman said:

I have just bought into a few Marijuana stocks (Aurora ACB.CN & Cronos Group MJN.V) and they have treated me very well over the past couple of months. You mentioned Canopy which has been on absolute fire since you first posted this. It has quadrupled in about 6 months. I have been following but am waiting/hoping for a bit of a drop off before I get in. It is currently at $12.

 

I think it is going to be interesting once it is legalized and some major companies (likely tobacco) start muscling their way into the industry.

Yeah there is definitely some good returns to be had in the marijuana sector. Im out of Canopy at the moment....I into Emerald and Supreme Pharmaceuticals looking for short term returns which after I plan on taking more long term positions in Canopy and Aphria....stay away from OGI they are getting a ton of bad press lately. 

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I'm an investor in CGC as well, jumped in when it was just under 3 bucks.  While this current uptrend is nice due to the expansion and all, it's important to remember that revenue has not matched with valuation.  A few months back when it rose up to nearly $18/share, to market cap of over $1 billion..... for a company that had only $10 million in revenue.  While I'm treating this as a long-term play, there may be huge corrections in the future. 

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17 hours ago, Vanisleryan said:

Also the reason Canopy is on a bit of a run these past few days is because it just finalized the deal to buy Mettrum, also changed there ticker to WEED from CGC...and the have financials coming out on the 14th which are supposed to be good.

Yeah I am hoping for Canopy to drop below $10 at some point for a more long term hold. It is going to be interesting once it gets legalized..

 

I have also been eyeing Hudson's Bay Company which has dropped significantly over the last 2 years but I feel it is a decent value play at the moment.

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23 minutes ago, I.Am.Ironman said:

I have also been eyeing Hudson's Bay Company which has dropped significantly over the last 2 years but I feel it is a decent value play at the moment.

May be a big acquisition in Hudson Bay's future.

 

Canada's Hudson's Bay makes takeover approach for Macy's: sources

Fri Feb 3, 2017 | 6:05pm EST

 

Hudson's Bay Co has made a takeover approach for struggling retailer Macy's Inc, people familiar with the matter said, trying to push further into the U.S. market where it already owns the Lord & Taylor and Saks Fifth Avenue chains.

 

While the Toronto-based company faces major financing and operating challenges in completing a deal to buy Macy's, which is trying to overhaul its operations, it could use its existing foothold in the U.S. to save on administrative costs and have more negotiating power with its vendors.

 

Shares of Macy's closed up 6.4 percent at $32.69 on Friday. Hudson's Bay rose to C$10.39.

 

Talks between the companies are at an early stage, one of the people said. The sources asked not to be identified because the negotiations are confidential. Hudson's Bay said it does not comment on rumors or speculation, while Macy's declined to comment.

 

Macy's, the host of New York's annual Thanksgiving Day parade, is in the midst of a turnaround engineered by Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Terry Lundgren, who assumed leadership of the company in 2004.

 

Lundgren is set to step down this year, and could earn $80.24 million if there is a change of company control, according to a filing.

 

Macy's has also been under pressure from activist hedge fund Starboard Value LP since 2015 to separate its real estate from its retail business to better monetize its real estate assets. Starboard estimated those assets to be worth $21 billion.

 

Starboard held around 1 percent of Macy's stock as of Sept. 30 last year, making it the company's 15th largest shareholder.

 

Starboard founder Jeff Smith did not return calls seeking comment.

 

PRIME REAL ESTATE ASSETS

 

Cincinnati, Ohio-based Macy's has around 900 stores in the U.S., which includes its Bloomingdale's outlets and its flagship store in New York City's Herald Square.

Hudson's Bay is well known for making money off its real estate assets. After buying Saks for $2.9 billion in 2013, it secured a $1.25 billion 20-year mortgage for its Fifth Avenue flagship location in New York, valuing the property at $3.7 billion.

 

Should Hudson's Bay acquire Macy's, it will likely bring similar real estate prowess to the jewel locations owned by the retailer. Still, should Hudson's Bay opt to sell some of Macy's less desirable locations, it would have to compete with a flood of properties for sale, as other struggling retailers also shed properties.

 

Hudson's Bay has traditionally financed deals through its joint ventures, giving it the ability to pull off deals that many peers might struggle to do without impacting their credit rating.

 

It has a partnership with Canada's RioCan Real Estate Investment Trust and with U.S.-based Simon Property Group Inc.

 

Hudson's Bay could raise equity and debt against its real estate portfolio to fund the deal, according to the Wall Street Journal, which first reported the news.

 

Cowen and Company said in an analyst note that Macy’s has attractive qualities for a buyer, including a low price to earnings valuation of 10 times, $2.8 billion of free cash flow and a large real estate portfolio. But chances of a deal were dim, the note said.

 

Macy's struggling turnaround and the continued pressure it faces from Amazon make a deal unlikely, Cowen said in the note, adding that Amazon itself could be a potential buyer of the company, given its expansion into physical stores.

 

Amazon did not immediately return a request for comment.

 

Founded in 1670, Hudson's Bay began as primarily a fur trading business and once owned more than 40 percent of what is now Canada, and also a significant portion of Minnesota and North Dakota.

 

It was acquired in 2008 by mall developer NRDC Equity Partners, headed by Richard Baker. The company, which is still run by Baker, went public in 2012.

 

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-macy-s-m-a-hudson-s-bay-idUSKBN15I22X

 

*****************************

 

Macy's market cap is just under $10B. That's a pretty big acquisition. Especially considering how poorly Macy's is doing. Hope the real estate assets are worth it if they do go ahead.

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1 hour ago, I.Am.Ironman said:

Yeah I am hoping for Canopy to drop below $10 at some point for a more long term hold. It is going to be interesting once it gets legalized..

 

I have also been eyeing Hudson's Bay Company which has dropped significantly over the last 2 years but I feel it is a decent value play at the moment.

Even though marijuana is legal in parts of the US, it is still illegal to actually export the stuff there.  Imagine if the rules change and suddenly CGC can send stuff south of the border.  Cha-ching....!

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On 2/11/2017 at 8:20 PM, AK_19 said:

I bought CGC back when it was 2.20 right after Trudeau got elected. It's sitting at 12ish dollars now =D

You're a smarter man than me. I bought at around 2.50 and sold at 3.40. Then it just skyrocketed which made me weary to re buy.

 

This is one that will haunt me for years to come.

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I am a graduate student, that has a peaking interesting in financial investments.

 

I currently have some money in an account with a financial advisor, which I plan to develop, but I am considering to play around with a couple grand on my own for mid-long term investments.

 

Does anyone recommend a good online trader resource? Or do those all require a large initial deposit?

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18 hours ago, KFBR392 said:

You're a smarter man than me. I bought at around 2.50 and sold at 3.40. Then it just skyrocketed which made me weary to re buy.

 

This is one that will haunt me for years to come.

It's hard.... but hindsight is always 20/20.

 

One thing to remember is that you can always "catch the next train". 

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