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Saskatchewan school in lockdown after shooting.


taxi

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3 minutes ago, riffraff said:

I would bet that none of us even considered for a second, using a gun in a rage moment.  A fight was just a fight.  A lot of times you were buds after.

Maybe in your world.  Too many shootings seem to be ones of opportunity rather than planned.  No available gun, not likely so many deaths, because the perpetrators would have time to calm themselves.  

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38 minutes ago, Alflives said:

Maybe in your world.  Too many shootings seem to be ones of opportunity rather than planned.  No available gun, not likely so many deaths, because the perpetrators would have time to calm themselves.  

I meant back when we were young

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Gerald Moise, father of shooting victim Dayne Fontaine, 17, pours gas on a fire prepares to soften the ground to dig a grave in La Loche, Sask., Monday, Jan. 25, 2016. A seventeen-year-old boy allegedly shot and killed Moise and three others. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Gerald Moise, father of shooting victim Dayne Fontaine, 17, pours gas on a fire prepares to soften the ground to dig a grave in La Loche, Sask., Monday, Jan. 25, 2016. A seventeen-year-old boy allegedly shot and killed Moise and three others. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/suspect-makes-first-court-appearance-today-saskatchewan-shootings-090507060.html?nhp=1

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Pretty smart idea lighting a fire to soften up the ground enough to dig a grave.

Not trying to poke fun here. This is a legitimate question. What is this guy thinking pouring gasoline on an open fire? Especially from a container that large which I assume is holding much more gasoline. What about the 3 guys standing directly behind him? Are they not concerned? At least the 4th guy is standing way back to the side.

Don't you normally start a fire from the ground up?

I do find it a little amusing that the box of Old Dutch chips they appear to be using as kindling (lower left hand side) looks like it's Bar-B-Q flavor.

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30 minutes ago, nuckin_futz said:

Gerald Moise, father of shooting victim Dayne Fontaine, 17, pours gas on a fire prepares to soften the ground to dig a grave in La Loche, Sask., Monday, Jan. 25, 2016. A seventeen-year-old boy allegedly shot and killed Moise and three others. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Gerald Moise, father of shooting victim Dayne Fontaine, 17, pours gas on a fire prepares to soften the ground to dig a grave in La Loche, Sask., Monday, Jan. 25, 2016. A seventeen-year-old boy allegedly shot and killed Moise and three others. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/suspect-makes-first-court-appearance-today-saskatchewan-shootings-090507060.html?nhp=1

************************

Pretty smart idea lighting a fire to soften up the ground enough to dig a grave.

Not trying to poke fun here. This is a legitimate question. What is this guy thinking pouring gasoline on an open fire? Especially from a container that large which I assume is holding much more gasoline. What about the 3 guys standing directly behind him? Are they not concerned? At least the 4th guy is standing way back to the side.

Don't you normally start a fire from the ground up?

I do find it a little amusing that the box of Old Dutch chips they appear to be using as kindling (lower left hand side) looks like it's Bar-B-Q flavor.

It's not really a danger from an unpressurized container. 

Starting a fire from the ground up would take a while. You'd have to gather the kindling and then slowly build the fire and increase the size of the logs. If you just have a bunch dry wood and throw gasoline on it, it'll go up much quicker. It makes sense not to pour the gasoline on first, as a lot of it would evaporate before you got the fire going or soak into the wood too far. You want it to create as much heat as possible by burning all at once. Not the most environmentally clean way of burning some wood, but what he's doing is effective.

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7 minutes ago, taxi said:

It's not really a danger from an unpressurized container. 

Starting a fire from the ground up would take a while. You'd have to gather the kindling and then slowly build the fire and increase the size of the logs. If you just have a bunch dry wood and throw gasoline on it, it'll go up much quicker. It makes sense not to pour the gasoline on first, as a lot of it would evaporate before you got the fire going or soak into the wood too far. You want it to create as much heat as possible by burning all at once. Not the most environmentally clean way of burning some wood, but what he's doing is effective.

Gasoline vaporizes very quickly and can result in a small explosion and a fireball. It's more likely that they are using diesel or jet b fuel.

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35 minutes ago, RWMc1 said:

Gasoline vaporizes very quickly and can result in a small explosion and a fireball. It's more likely that they are using diesel or jet b fuel.

You're not going to see any explosions with a small open plastic canister, but yes perhaps some fireballs. Diesel would be a very bad choice for starting a fire in cold temperatures, as you have to heat diesel to a relatively high temperature before it burns in the first place. Diesel works in engines, because it is compressed. 

Jet fuel, aka Karosene would be the best choice, yes.

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3 hours ago, taxi said:

It's not really a danger from an unpressurized container. 

Starting a fire from the ground up would take a while. You'd have to gather the kindling and then slowly build the fire and increase the size of the logs. If you just have a bunch dry wood and throw gasoline on it, it'll go up much quicker. It makes sense not to pour the gasoline on first, as a lot of it would evaporate before you got the fire going or soak into the wood too far. You want it to create as much heat as possible by burning all at once. Not the most environmentally clean way of burning some wood, but what he's doing is effective.

Not really.

they would still have to add a bunch of wood on top of those flames, flames that won't last very long as flames from gas are quick.

 

fire burns up, not down. I garuntee they would have way more success starting with a smaller growing up fire using dry, seasoned wood.

 

seasoned wood is also key, and going on an experienced hunch, the chain saw chips in the photo and the fact that they are using all logs in similar lengths would suggest that those are "green" logs which are nearly impossible to get going at that size.....hence the thinking of "we'll just chuck a bit of gas on 'er."

 

i could be be wrong about the logs being green but I doubt it.

 

better off tarping an area and running a heater 

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La Loche Residents No Strangers to Violence.

http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/la-loche-residents-all-too-familiar-with-violence/ar-BBoUuQx?ocid=spartanntp

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There are 36 faces on the homemade poster that rests against the wall of the community centre in La Loche, Sask. Some people in the photographs are smiling, some are not. Some are middle-aged or older, although most of them are young. But all were from La Loche and the surrounding community, and all of them committed suicide.

Long before this small, predominantly First Nations town was vaulted into national consciousness by a mass shooting on Jan. 22, the residents of La Loche were all too familiar with violence.

According to a report in the Saskatoon Star Phoenix last year, suicide rates in the northern health region that includes the town were more than three times higher than the province as a whole.

But Lucy Guetre has felt the pain even more than most in the town of 3,000. Two of the faces on that poster belong to her sons.

“I lost so much of myself,” she says, the pain of their deaths still raw.

Her oldest son, Desmond Montgrand, was 30 when he hanged himself on Oct. 5, 2012. Her youngest son, Randy Montgrand, did the same on May 7, 2014, when he was 27.

Within her tiny frame, Guetre, 50, embodies both the trauma and resilience that defines the people of La Loche. She has been gutted by the deaths of her sons, but she is determined to prevent other families from experiencing similar tragedies.

Last October, she started a suicide prevention group. They hold prayer meetings twice a month at the community hall and are trying to raise money through bake sales to provide youth activities, to keep young peoples’ minds off “bad stuff,” she says.

Guetre stepped up because she found out first hand how difficult it can be to access mental-health support services in La Loche.

After Desmond killed himself, she says, her other son began expressing suicidal thoughts. He ended up in the local hospital, but there were no counsellors available. So Guetre, her husband and her daughters had to stay by his bed around the clock to make sure he didn’t harm himself.

“Then, finally, the third day, I got really angry, I got mad. I went up to the front and I said, ‘Where’s the supporters that are supposed to be here three days ago?’ ” she says. “Three days later, they finally got someone from out of town.”

Randy did see a counsellor for a while but it ultimately didn’t prevent him from killing himself.

Like everyone else in the community, Guetre doesn’t know for sure what was behind the horrific shootings on Jan. 22. A 17-year-old boy from La Loche has been arrested for the crime, in which four people were killed and seven others were injured.

But she’s concerned that the counsellors who were brought to the town in the wake of the high-profile tragedy won’t be there for the long run.

“After they leave, is there support for these kids? Is there going to be people here to help them through this?” she asks.

While she’s trying to heal her community, Guetre is also trying to pick up the pieces of her own life. She’s found it difficult to work because her boys are always on her minds. But she decided to enrol in a local adult education program.

“It’s never too late . . . no matter how old you are or what life takes you through,” she says.

 

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