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DonLever

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HE talks about covid and how it was/is handled yet this is the same moron that said this:

    https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2021/11/dr-oz-expected-to-announce-pennsylvania-senate-run

 

"During a Hannity appearance in the early days of the pandemic, Oz was oddly cavalier about the prospect of increased COVID deaths that some feared at the time would result from reopening schools; a two-to-three percent increase in total deaths, he told Hannity, might be an “appetizing opportunity” to “get our mojo back” as a society. He apologized for the dismissive remarks, "

 

 

Also of note- this link has Doc Oz talking about the "best ways To protect against covid"

https://www.eatthis.com/dr-oz-covid-protection/

 

1  Get enough sleep

2  Exercise regularly

3  Use a humidifier

4  Change air filters

5  Meditate

6  Don't shake hands

7  Embrace the power of a good head nod

8  Eliminate face touching

9  Wash your hands

10 Use hand sanitizer

11 Disinfect surfaces

12 Stock up on household supplies

13 Stock up on food

14 Stock up on prescription drugs

15 Eat fruit and veggies

16 Take vitamin D3

17 Get the flu shot----   While the flu shot won't keep you from getting infected with COVID-19, it will protect you from the flu. Dr. Oz suggests getting a flu shot in order to "avoid confusing seasonal flu with COVID-19."

18 If you get sick amp up on vitamins

19 Wear your face mask

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Anyone see where Oz says "Get vaccinated?"

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by gurn
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10 minutes ago, RUPERTKBD said:

One has to wonder how one can praise Donald Trump and criticize the handling of the pandemic in the same breath....:picard:

 

16 minutes ago, nuckin_futz said:

Everyone's favourite ***hole is running for the Senate as a Republican. The celebrity Dr is slamming "elites" without a hint of irony.

 

 

Hope that clears it up.

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33 minutes ago, nuckin_futz said:

Dr. Oz confirms he'll run for Senate, slams 'elites' for handling of pandemic

 

Dr. Oz' Enters Senate Race, Raising Questions About TV Show | TVLine

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz, known to daytime television watchers as Dr. Oz, is getting into politics. 

 

In an op-ed for conservative news website The Washington Examiner, Oz confirmed reports he will enter the race for Pennsylvania's open Senate seat. A source told Yahoo News earlier on Tuesday that the television personality was seriously considering a run as a Republican and it's clear from his verbiage where he stands. Oz praised former President Donald Trump for showing "brilliance" in mRNA vaccine development, called out "government-mandated policies that caused unnecessary suffering" and slammed "elites."

 

"We are angry at our government and at each other," the 61-year-old cardiothoracic surgeon began. "We have not managed our crises as effectively as past generations. During the pandemic, I learned that when you mix politics and medicine, you get politics instead of solutions. That's why I am running for the U.S. Senate: to help fix the problems and to help us heal."

 

Oz was not shy in acknowledging his television background, which began as a health expert on The Oprah Winfrey Show before The Dr. Oz Show premiered in 2009. He's long been a controversial figure in the medical world but made it clear the pandemic motivated this political bid.

 

"The reality of our challenges has crystallized during the pandemic," Oz added. "COVID-19 became an excuse for the government and elite thinkers who controlled the means of communication to suspend debate. Dissenting opinions from leading scholars were ridiculed and canceled so their ideas could not be disseminated."

 

Oz blamed the government for causing "unnecessary suffering" and that "the public was patronized and misled instead of empowered."

 

"We were told to lock down quietly and let those in charge take care of the rest. When we tested positive for the virus, we were also told to wait at home until our lips turned blue and we got sick enough to warrant hospitalization. To be clear, this is not a typical medical protocol," he continued. "Elites with yards told those without yards to stay inside, where the virus was more likely to spread."

 

Oz continued, "Doctors are trained to tell it like it is because you deserve to hear our best advice and make your own decisions. It’s why I have fought the establishment my whole career. In this emergency, we needed capable leaders ready to act. We didn't get that. Sometimes, in medical emergencies, we will need to operate with swift and decisive action. Sometimes, we can use less invasive medications to correct course. Sometimes, we will use preventive health to stop problems from even emerging in the first place. We need to use all of our tools and tactics to get the job done in society, too."

 

Oz, who highlighted that he's the son of Turkish immigrants, said he wants to "fight for the benefit of our descendants."

 

"We have fumbled the baton we're supposed to pass to our children. And I want to pick up that baton and start racing toward our promising future," he concluded. "I'm running for the Senate to empower you to control your destiny, to reinvigorate our great nation, and to reignite the divine spark that we should always be seeing in each other."

 

The 2022 Senate race in Pennsylvania is going to be one of the most competitive and high-profile in the country with GOP Sen. Pat Toomey's retirement. The race blew open when Republican Sean Parnell, who was endorsed by Trump, suspended his campaign last week amid abuse allegations from his estranged wife.

 

It's unclear what Oz's Senate run means for his namesake show — but the program's website is now entirely about his campaign. A spokesperson for The Dr. Oz Show did not comment when contacted.

 

**************************

 

Everyone's favourite ***hole is running for the Senate as a Republican. The celebrity Dr is slamming "elites" without a hint of irony.

 

When does this circus leave town?

I have words.  Much of them 4 letters or so.

 

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50 minutes ago, nuckin_futz said:

Dr. Oz confirms he'll run for Senate, slams 'elites' for handling of pandemic

 

Dr. Oz' Enters Senate Race, Raising Questions About TV Show | TVLine

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz, known to daytime television watchers as Dr. Oz, is getting into politics. 

 

In an op-ed for conservative news website The Washington Examiner, Oz confirmed reports he will enter the race for Pennsylvania's open Senate seat. A source told Yahoo News earlier on Tuesday that the television personality was seriously considering a run as a Republican and it's clear from his verbiage where he stands. Oz praised former President Donald Trump for showing "brilliance" in mRNA vaccine development, called out "government-mandated policies that caused unnecessary suffering" and slammed "elites."

What, like this fat f@#$ was in the lab developing vaccines? Also, iirc, didn't pfizer reject government funding for their vaccine? Another grifter in the Republican party, say it ain't so. 

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53 minutes ago, bishopshodan said:

Oz is a fricking fist magnet. Can't stand that clown. Makes sense that he wants to join the circus. 

Gotta say, I was pretty pissed at the Jeopardy show runners for giving him a stint as host. Isn't that show supposed to be about facts? <_<

 

It's one of my favorite shows, but with Mike Richards, Aaron Rodgers and Oz, they've had a rough year or so. I'm glad Alex didn't have to witness it...

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3 hours ago, gurn said:

HE talks about covid and how it was/is handled yet this is the same moron that said this:

    https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2021/11/dr-oz-expected-to-announce-pennsylvania-senate-run

 

"During a Hannity appearance in the early days of the pandemic, Oz was oddly cavalier about the prospect of increased COVID deaths that some feared at the time would result from reopening schools; a two-to-three percent increase in total deaths, he told Hannity, might be an “appetizing opportunity” to “get our mojo back” as a society. He apologized for the dismissive remarks, "

 

 

Also of note- this link has Doc Oz talking about the "best ways To protect against covid"

https://www.eatthis.com/dr-oz-covid-protection/

 

1  Get enough sleep

2  Exercise regularly

3  Use a humidifier

4  Change air filters

5  Meditate

6  Don't shake hands

7  Embrace the power of a good head nod

8  Eliminate face touching

9  Wash your hands

10 Use hand sanitizer

11 Disinfect surfaces

12 Stock up on household supplies

13 Stock up on food

14 Stock up on prescription drugs

15 Eat fruit and veggies

16 Take vitamin D3

17 Get the flu shot----   While the flu shot won't keep you from getting infected with COVID-19, it will protect you from the flu. Dr. Oz suggests getting a flu shot in order to "avoid confusing seasonal flu with COVID-19."

18 If you get sick amp up on vitamins

19 Wear your face mask

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Anyone see where Oz says "Get vaccinated?"

 

 

 

 

 

 

This dr. from Oz sure sounds like a MORON!  Who are these people?  

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Why US abortion laws could be changed by Supreme Court ruling

The US Supreme Court is about to hear the most important abortion case in a generation.

 

On Wednesday it will consider a Mississippi law, which asks the court to ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy - barring the procedure about two months earlier than the court has ever allowed before.

 

Its final ruling, due in June next year, could cut off abortion services for tens of millions of women.

What is the right to abortion in the US?

A woman's right to abortion was established in 1973, following a Supreme Court ruling in a case known as Roe v Wade.

 

The decision gave women in the US an absolute right to an abortion in the first three months of pregnancy, and limited rights in the second three months.

Nearly two decades later the court made another key decision.

 

In Planned Parenthood v Casey, the court ruled that states could not place an "undue burden" on women seeking abortions before foetal viability.

 

In the US, this threshold for when foetuses can sustain life outside the womb has been set at about 23 or 24 weeks.

Why could a Mississippi law overturn Roe v Wade?

A state law was passed in Mississippi in 2018 which would make most abortions illegal after the first 15 weeks of pregnancy - including those caused by rape or incest.

 

 

It hasn't been enforced due to a legal challenge by Mississippi's only abortion provider, the Jackson Women's Health Organization.

 

The US Supreme Court is now due to consider the case.

 

Mississippi is asking for Roe v Wade to be overturned, and with it the constitutional right to an abortion in the US.

 

If successful, states would be welcome to set their own standards for abortion - including outright bans before foetal viability.

 

Nearly two dozen states are expected to introduce their own bans, some probably more severe than Mississippi's.

A map showing abortion policy in the US if Roe v Wade was overturned
 
A map showing abortion policy in the US if Roe v Wade was overturned

In a legal brief filed this summer Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch - who will be defending the state's law - said that throwing out Roe would effectively return decision-making about abortion to the American people and their elected officials.

 

"The matter should be returned to the States and the people," she wrote. Ms Fitch did not return a BBC request for comment.

How is the Supreme Court expected to rule?

There are three possible outcomes next summer:

  • overturn Roe v Wade

  • rule that the Mississippi law does not place "an undue burden" on women seeking an abortion - this would leave Roe standing in principle, while undermining it in practice

  • strike down the Mississippi law, allowing Roe to stand - though this is considered unlikely

The first option is a distinct possibility. The court, reshaped by three appointments under former President Donald Trump, has been called the most conservative-leaning in modern US history.

 

"It has been a 50 year campaign to overrule Roe v Wade and there certainly are enough members of the court now to do so," said Katherine Franke, director of the center for gender and sexuality law at Columbia University.

 

But she believes an outright repeal is unlikely. Instead, the court could uphold the Mississippi law while keeping both Roe and Casey in place.

 

Still, lawyers for Jackson Women's Health Organization have said that such a decision is tantamount to gutting the court's past abortion rulings, because it would discard the foetal viability standard.

Where could abortion become illegal if Roe v Wade is overturned?

That could happen in 22 states, including Mississippi.

 

Twelve have passed so-called trigger laws, which would automatically ban abortion if Roe was overruled.

 

Others have either passed unconstitutional abortion bans in the years since Roe v Wade (which would be revived), or retained abortion restrictions from before Roe, which are currently unenforceable.

 

In all, nearly half of US women of reproductive age (18-49) - some 36 million - could lose abortion access, according to research from Planned Parenthood, a healthcare organisation which provides abortions.

A map showing how abortion laws have become more restrictive in the past 2 decades
 
A map showing how abortion laws have become more restrictive in the past 2 decades

In more than half of US states, abortion access would probably remain the same.

 

In 15 states and the District of Columbia, state law guarantees the right to an abortion even if Roe v Wade is overturned.

Who would be most affected?

Hollowing out abortion access would most intensely affect poor women - who are already more likely to seek an abortion in the first place.

Black and Latina women are likely to be inordinately affected - 61% of abortion patients are minorities.

 

 

A bar graph showing the racial disparities in terms of reported abortions in the US
 
A bar graph showing the racial disparities in terms of reported abortions in the US

"The typical abortion patient is in their 20s, doesn't have a lot of money and has one or more children," said Rachel Jones, a principal investigator at the Guttmacher Institute, a pro-choice group.

 

"These are the groups that are going to be the most impacted when restrictions are placed on abortion, or abortion is banned."

Why it isn't always easy to get an abortion now

Although Roe v Wade gave US women a guaranteed right to an abortion, for millions it is a right in name only.

 

In the decades since 1973, anti-abortion rulings have gradually pared back access in more than a dozen states.

 

In 2021 alone, nearly 600 abortion restrictions have been introduced nationwide, with 90 enacted into law. That is more than in any year since Roe.

 

 

And abortions have long been out of reach for many low-income women.

 

Since 1976, a law known as the Hyde Amendment has blocked the use of federal funding for the procedure.

 

Women are often forced to pay for abortion themselves, which can cost cost hundreds of dollars.

 

 

*****************************

 

Pretty much the item at the top of the Conservative wish list for nearly the last 50 years. They have been gearing up for this for decades.

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13 minutes ago, nuckin_futz said:

Why US abortion laws could be changed by Supreme Court ruling

The US Supreme Court is about to hear the most important abortion case in a generation.

 

On Wednesday it will consider a Mississippi law, which asks the court to ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy - barring the procedure about two months earlier than the court has ever allowed before.

 

Its final ruling, due in June next year, could cut off abortion services for tens of millions of women.

What is the right to abortion in the US?

A woman's right to abortion was established in 1973, following a Supreme Court ruling in a case known as Roe v Wade.

 

The decision gave women in the US an absolute right to an abortion in the first three months of pregnancy, and limited rights in the second three months.

Nearly two decades later the court made another key decision.

 

In Planned Parenthood v Casey, the court ruled that states could not place an "undue burden" on women seeking abortions before foetal viability.

 

In the US, this threshold for when foetuses can sustain life outside the womb has been set at about 23 or 24 weeks.

Why could a Mississippi law overturn Roe v Wade?

A state law was passed in Mississippi in 2018 which would make most abortions illegal after the first 15 weeks of pregnancy - including those caused by rape or incest.

 

 

It hasn't been enforced due to a legal challenge by Mississippi's only abortion provider, the Jackson Women's Health Organization.

 

The US Supreme Court is now due to consider the case.

 

Mississippi is asking for Roe v Wade to be overturned, and with it the constitutional right to an abortion in the US.

 

If successful, states would be welcome to set their own standards for abortion - including outright bans before foetal viability.

 

Nearly two dozen states are expected to introduce their own bans, some probably more severe than Mississippi's.

A map showing abortion policy in the US if Roe v Wade was overturned
 

A map showing abortion policy in the US if Roe v Wade was overturned

In a legal brief filed this summer Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch - who will be defending the state's law - said that throwing out Roe would effectively return decision-making about abortion to the American people and their elected officials.

 

"The matter should be returned to the States and the people," she wrote. Ms Fitch did not return a BBC request for comment.

How is the Supreme Court expected to rule?

There are three possible outcomes next summer:

  • overturn Roe v Wade

  • rule that the Mississippi law does not place "an undue burden" on women seeking an abortion - this would leave Roe standing in principle, while undermining it in practice

  • strike down the Mississippi law, allowing Roe to stand - though this is considered unlikely

The first option is a distinct possibility. The court, reshaped by three appointments under former President Donald Trump, has been called the most conservative-leaning in modern US history.

 

"It has been a 50 year campaign to overrule Roe v Wade and there certainly are enough members of the court now to do so," said Katherine Franke, director of the center for gender and sexuality law at Columbia University.

 

But she believes an outright repeal is unlikely. Instead, the court could uphold the Mississippi law while keeping both Roe and Casey in place.

 

Still, lawyers for Jackson Women's Health Organization have said that such a decision is tantamount to gutting the court's past abortion rulings, because it would discard the foetal viability standard.

Where could abortion become illegal if Roe v Wade is overturned?

That could happen in 22 states, including Mississippi.

 

Twelve have passed so-called trigger laws, which would automatically ban abortion if Roe was overruled.

 

Others have either passed unconstitutional abortion bans in the years since Roe v Wade (which would be revived), or retained abortion restrictions from before Roe, which are currently unenforceable.

 

In all, nearly half of US women of reproductive age (18-49) - some 36 million - could lose abortion access, according to research from Planned Parenthood, a healthcare organisation which provides abortions.

A map showing how abortion laws have become more restrictive in the past 2 decades
 

A map showing how abortion laws have become more restrictive in the past 2 decades

In more than half of US states, abortion access would probably remain the same.

 

In 15 states and the District of Columbia, state law guarantees the right to an abortion even if Roe v Wade is overturned.

Who would be most affected?

Hollowing out abortion access would most intensely affect poor women - who are already more likely to seek an abortion in the first place.

Black and Latina women are likely to be inordinately affected - 61% of abortion patients are minorities.

 

 

A bar graph showing the racial disparities in terms of reported abortions in the US
 

A bar graph showing the racial disparities in terms of reported abortions in the US

"The typical abortion patient is in their 20s, doesn't have a lot of money and has one or more children," said Rachel Jones, a principal investigator at the Guttmacher Institute, a pro-choice group.

 

"These are the groups that are going to be the most impacted when restrictions are placed on abortion, or abortion is banned."

Why it isn't always easy to get an abortion now

Although Roe v Wade gave US women a guaranteed right to an abortion, for millions it is a right in name only.

 

In the decades since 1973, anti-abortion rulings have gradually pared back access in more than a dozen states.

 

In 2021 alone, nearly 600 abortion restrictions have been introduced nationwide, with 90 enacted into law. That is more than in any year since Roe.

 

 

And abortions have long been out of reach for many low-income women.

 

Since 1976, a law known as the Hyde Amendment has blocked the use of federal funding for the procedure.

 

Women are often forced to pay for abortion themselves, which can cost cost hundreds of dollars.

 

 

*****************************

 

Pretty much the item at the top of the Conservative wish list for nearly the last 50 years. They have been gearing up for this for decades.

This is probably going to be the most lasting damage Trump caused due to the pieces of trash he got into the SCOTUS.  The best hope for preventing these lunatics from forcing their barbaric viewpoints on others may be for ACB, Gorsuch, or Kavanaugh to drop dead.  Canada needs to start looking into approving refugee status for the poor women down there if Ro v Wade gets repealed.

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Yeah US is turning into a reality show by the day. 

 

Winder what would the 2021 season finale be. Tough to top the season opening this time around. My bet is the complete overturn of Roe V Wade followed by rapid legislation from red states banning abortion all together. 

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2 hours ago, 4petesake said:


CNN suspends Chris Cuomo.

 

 

 

When news of his BS came out  plenty of us were all for this.  Plenty of us leftist libtards (so called by the usual troll who's been banned over and over).   

 

Yet, when Cucker openly admitted he lies, nothing but defending him from the usual troll.  

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8 hours ago, RUPERTKBD said:

One has to wonder how one can praise Donald Trump and criticize the handling of the pandemic in the same breath....:picard:

 

7 hours ago, nuckin_futz said:

 

Hope that clears it up.

 

7 hours ago, bishopshodan said:

Oz is a fricking fist magnet. Can't stand that clown. Makes sense that he wants to join the circus. 

 

7 hours ago, JoeyJoeJoeJr. Shabadoo said:

What, like this fat f@#$ was in the lab developing vaccines? Also, iirc, didn't pfizer reject government funding for their vaccine? Another grifter in the Republican party, say it ain't so. 

You guys worry too much.
Once MTG, Boebert and rest of the goobers find out that his name is not wizard of Oz but Mehmet Cengiz.

The only squad he will be joining is the one where Omar and Tlaib are.

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11 hours ago, 24K PureCool said:

Yeah US is turning into a reality show by the day. 

 

Winder what would the 2021 season finale be. Tough to top the season opening this time around. My bet is the complete overturn of Roe V Wade followed by rapid legislation from red states banning abortion all together. 

I mean, you kind of have the give the repugnants credit........they are far less popular than the Dems, but win far more frequently and have figured out how to take over the country despite having significantly less support than the left.  They understand that taking over school boards, city councils is incredibly effective at getting what they want at a local level.  They also understand that once they gain some power at the state level they can redraw districts to ensure they are re-elected at the state and federal levels, despite being relatively unpopular and not really doing anything to actually govern.

 

The Dems are focused on policy and governing and they don't really seem to notice they are being cut out of the game.

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