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USA Politics/Election Thread: Biden, Harris, Trump, Democrats, Republicans, et al


DonLever

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3 minutes ago, stawns said:

they were the propaganda wing that they used to completely undermine the public school system, which was the Libs goal.  The Libs gutted the education system in a way that was nothing short of criminal and then the Fraser Institute came out with report after report painting public schools as horrific places to send your kids.  Their annual "report" grading schools completely disgust me

I do think there's a reasonable discussion to be had around performance evaluations in all public service jobs, but yeah that ranking stuff is a bit much. I'm also much more of a carrot than a stick type person when it comes to evaluations, I'd like to see better performance rewarded vs. clawing back salaries. 

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10 minutes ago, stawns said:

if not for two senators, the Dems would be in great shape, imo.  Manchin and Synema have completely cut the legs out from under the Dems 


I agree, yet that’s a pretty major qualifier. If they can’t even pass the John Lewis Freedom to Vote Act while all the attention is on MLK day…with even the vilest members of the GOP hypocritically heaping praise on him. 

 

Manchin and Synema will be to blame if the Dems lose the midterms but that hasn’t been news for the better part of a year and they haven’t been able to change the narrative.

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1 hour ago, JM_ said:

I do think there's a reasonable discussion to be had around performance evaluations in all public service jobs, but yeah that ranking stuff is a bit much. I'm also much more of a carrot than a stick type person when it comes to evaluations, I'd like to see better performance rewarded vs. clawing back salaries. 

I've yet to see a way to accurately quantify education or educators.  There's simply too many variables to get an accurate read.  Admin know who the less than effective teachers are and theyre held to a standard by admin.  Beyond that, I think it's almost impossible........certainly not from a standardized test no one cares about and that's how the FI does it

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8 hours ago, stawns said:

The Fraser institute?

 

Matthew Broderick Jewish GIF

My point is that no society has a true democracy. 

 

 

https://deborahcoyne.ca/canadas-faux-democracy/

 

Many of the points Deborah makes constitutional lawyers make here in Aus and can be made about most liberal democracies.

 

She also makes the point I made in the Covid thread about the failure of your government to heed the warnings after the SAR's outbreak. 

 

 

 

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24 minutes ago, JoeyJoeJoeJr. Shabadoo said:

Comparing public schools, who have to take every student in their catchment area regardless of their ability, socioeconomic status, etc., to private institutions with entrance requirements, is unfair and utterly useless. Not a single taxpayers dime should go to private education with the exception of some special needs schools who don't get enough. 

totally agree

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16 minutes ago, stawns said:

I've yet to see a way to accurately quantify education or educators.  There's simply too many variables to get an accurate read.  Admin know who the less than effective teachers are and theyre held to a standard by admin.  Beyond that, I think it's almost impossible........certainly not from a standardized test no one cares about and that's how the FI does it

I've heard the same about physicians, and there has been movement there. 

 

The bigger issue is why you'd do it, and if you'd attach it to pay, or some other kind of benefit. 

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5 hours ago, CBH1926 said:

From Russification of the the other USSR republics, forcefully removing and relocating the population, suppressing and destroying culture in other countries, military interventions in Hungary, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Afghanistan etc.

USSR was an empire that had military installations in Syria, Egypt, Mongolia, Cuba, Somalia, Finland, Angola, Vietnam, Yemen, Poland, Albania, East Germany etc. Textbook definition of an empire and referred to as such by many historians and political analysts.

 

I disagree with the liberation notion, USSR occupied Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania in 1940 and parts of Poland in 1939. Molotov and Ribbentrop deal took care of that, the only mistake that the Hitler made was attacking the USSR. When the Red Army arrived, Eastern Europe wasn’t given a chance, even the ones that were not liberated by them. Partisans numbered almost 800 000 in 1945 in Yugoslavia, overwhelming majority of the country was liberated by them.

 

When the Red Army entered through Serbia, they were very much interested in pillaging and raping.

So much that the Yugoslav army was mobilized to stop that.

As soon as the ties with the USSR were broken, Stalin started to plan an invasion through Bulgaria and Romania. The only thing that stopped him is the fact that he dropped dead,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I was taught the Soviet Bloc,not Empire. 

 

When you research the The Russian Empire it is stated that it extended across Eurasia from 1721 and it ended on March the 5th 1917 when Tzar Nicholas the 2nd abdicated.

 

The fact of the matter is that in the only conflict that had any moral justification in the history of our species, the Russians made the greatest sacrifice. 

 

I am not talking about Stalin and the Russian leadership, I am talking about the Russian people. 

 

This does not justify the actions that many Soviet soldiers engaged in defeating the Nazi's.

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7 hours ago, JM_ said:

I get that. Every group has its bias, so that part doesn't bother me. What I do like about some of their papers is you can often get good data sources. They skip over ones that don't help their point, but all these groups do that. Its like reading the Tyee and thinking thats the whole story. 

Totally Jim. 

 

I research as much as I can and will listen to both sides. 

 

There was a couple of other articles I wanted to post however they were behind pay walls. 

 

The article I have posted today by a constitutional lawyer, makes the points I wanted to make. 

 

Many of them can be applied to our political system.

 

Here in Aus we don't get to choose the candidate's, it is a party process.

The candidate's are beholden to donors- political lobbyists, many of which were political staffers and now work for corporate interests. 

 

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1 hour ago, JoeyJoeJoeJr. Shabadoo said:

Comparing public schools, who have to take every student in their catchment area regardless of their ability, socioeconomic status, etc., to private institutions with entrance requirements, is unfair and utterly useless. Not a single taxpayers dime should go to private education with the exception of some special needs schools who don't get enough. 

This is a topic that really pisses me off.

 

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-09-02/how-the-catholic-school-system-takes-from-the-poor/12588920

 

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1 hour ago, JoeyJoeJoeJr. Shabadoo said:

Comparing public schools, who have to take every student in their catchment area regardless of their ability, socioeconomic status, etc., to private institutions with entrance requirements, is unfair and utterly useless. Not a single taxpayers dime should go to private education with the exception of some special needs schools who don't get enough. 

Not to mention private schools don't have to use resources on special needs.  As someone who experienced both public and private schools, and whose parents each taught at both, there is very little difference in the quality of teachers.

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1 hour ago, JoeyJoeJoeJr. Shabadoo said:

Comparing public schools, who have to take every student in their catchment area regardless of their ability, socioeconomic status, etc., to private institutions with entrance requirements, is unfair and utterly useless. Not a single taxpayers dime should go to private education with the exception of some special needs schools who don't get enough. 

The Fraser Institute uses the FSA, which is an absolutely ridiculous standardized test forced on grade 4 and 7, and they use the results to determine their rankings for elementary schools.  This test is given in the first two months of the year and has questions on stuff that most won't cover until the last term.  Further to that, it's been well established that private schools keep their "less desirable" kids at home when it's FSA time to make their scores look better.

 

Every school is different and usually the ones that seem the worst are the ones with the best, most experienced teachers and the poorest, most at risk students where the goal is to try and teach them to be good citizens because they get no parental guidance whatsoever or are dealing with serious trauma. 

 

How do you evaluate teachers in that school with the same standards as a school in a wealthy neighborhood, with students who get parental support and even tutouring etc.  You can't and that's why you can't evaluate teachers beyond in school administrators who can monitor classes and teachers on a personal level.......which does happen.  

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Dems really should heavily advertise US passport card. They are a photo ID that can be issued easily at any us post office for like $30 without the ridiculousness of the dmv for a state issued ID.

 

That should mitigate some of the voter ID laws the gop are pushing in most states. 

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7 hours ago, 4petesake said:


I agree, yet that’s a pretty major qualifier. If they can’t even pass the John Lewis Freedom to Vote Act while all the attention is on MLK day…with even the vilest members of the GOP hypocritically heaping praise on him. 

 

Manchin and Synema will be to blame if the Dems lose the midterms but that hasn’t been news for the better part of a year and they haven’t been able to change the narrative.

The last laugh might be on Sinema. She's losing a lot of support in her own state over her BS. There are efforts to primary her then she has lost the progressive left and they might just sit out the general election. 

Her old friends and associates have been coming out in droves publicly against her in recent months. 

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14 hours ago, Ilunga said:

Totally Jim. 

 

I research as much as I can and will listen to both sides. 

 

There was a couple of other articles I wanted to post however they were behind pay walls. 

 

The article I have posted today by a constitutional lawyer, makes the points I wanted to make. 

 

Many of them can be applied to our political system.

 

Here in Aus we don't get to choose the candidate's, it is a party process.

The candidate's are beholden to donors- political lobbyists, many of which were political staffers and now work for corporate interests. 

 

even with its flaws, I'd still take the parliamentary system over the US style, its just so corrupt and easily abused. 

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25 minutes ago, JM_ said:

even with its flaws, I'd still take the parliamentary system over the US style, its just so corrupt and easily abused. 

Absolutely. It's ridiculous that Republican senators representing 40 million less people than their Democrat counterparts, can completely stonewall the agenda that the majority of Americans voted for....

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2 minutes ago, RUPERTKBD said:

Absolutely. It's ridiculous that Republican senators representing 40 million less people than their Democrat counterparts, can completely stonewall the agenda that the majority of Americans voted for....

our senate has a lot of flaws, but at least its roughly regional. You also avoid the grift that comes with an elected senate. 

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9 hours ago, Gnarcore said:

The last laugh might be on Sinema. She's losing a lot of support in her own state over her BS. There are efforts to primary her then she has lost the progressive left and they might just sit out the general election. 

Her old friends and associates have been coming out in droves publicly against her in recent months. 

It appears as though I'm not the only one who thinks the Dems should stop focusing on their two intransigent Senators and direct their efforts at exposing the real danger to democracy in the US, the obstructionist Republicans:

 

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/newspolitics/im-furious-about-democrats-taking-the-blame-—-its-time-to-fight-back/ar-AASWaEq?li=AAggNb9
 

Quote

 

Like many Democrats, both progressives and moderates, I am deeply disappointed by Sens. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) torpedoing the effort to suspend the filibuster so the voting rights legislation could pass the Senate. I am disappointed as an American because I am convinced that some of the protections in the bill will help preserve our democracy, but I am also concerned that failing to suspend the filibuster for this bill could have a damaging effect on the Democrats' chances to hold the House and Senate in November's elections.

For the past several weeks, media coverage of the fight to pass the voting rights bill has centered on the Hamlet-level intrigue generated by Manchin and Sinema, who coyly made headlines with their on-again, off-again decisions about whether to suspend the rules and eliminate the filibuster just for the Freedom to Vote Act and the John R. Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act.

Now anger has eclipsed my disappointment. I'm angry at the media and pundits who are letting Republicans manipulate the discourse, convincing the average American that the only reason vital legislation to protect the right to vote is stalled is that two Democratic senators are not in favor of the measure.

 

Truth be told, the Republican Party deserves far more blame for allowing the voting rights bill to die on the vine since every member of the GOP caucus has pledged to vote against it.

The media seem willing, or unmotivated, to fully cover this blow to democracy and expose the Republican opposition. If you followed this issue just in the news, you might think the battle is being waged solely within the Democratic Party. The media have given Republicans a free pass and have failed to give attention to the solid phalanx that Republicans have put up against it. That means the Democrats must do so.

If I were currently Democratic National Committee chair, as I was more than two decades ago, I would purchase full-page ads in newspapers, saturate the radio airwaves in every urban center, blanket billboards in neighborhoods that are predominantly home to people of color, and penetrate social media platforms that these voters frequent. I would tell these citizens the real score - 48 Democrats in favor and 50 Republicans lined up against a bill to protect voting rights.

We must flood Black and Hispanic communities with this information so that the Democratic base understands that even though Manchin and Sinema have been unreasonable, the real blame for the stalemate rests with Republicans who will not permit even one senator to vote in favor of lifting the filibuster so the bill can proceed to a vote.

Beyond ads, we must deploy a virtual armada of Democrats to speak to civic groups, fraternal organizations and other public venues to explain how Republicans want to kill voting rights.

I am certain that this sort of aggressive public relations campaign would get the message across - and I'm equally certain if we don't wage this fight, Democrats will take the blame for its failure at the polls this fall. We must cement the understanding among diverse Democrats that Republicans kiboshed the voting rights legislation and, in doing so, generated the enthusiasm needed for a massive voter turnout in 2022.

That is a strategy for electing at least three more Democrats to the Senate. If we can effectively communicate this message to our base, they will help us make that happen and, at the same time, save all Americans' right to vote - and perhaps, even our democracy.

It is time to counter-punch and turn every argument on the Republicans, so that they pay the price for their cynical stance to maintain the filibuster and reduce the number of Americans able to legally cast their votes in 2022.

But we should not stop there. We need a second part of this strategy that can be achieved by forcing Republicans to cast votes on every issue and create a record to run against. Of course, thanks to the absurd filibuster rule, we can't force them to cast a "yes" or "no" vote on the actual bills themselves, but we can force them to cast votes upholding the filibuster and effectively killing the legislation.

So, make Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) vote no on protecting the right to vote, access to the polls, and blocking voter suppression. Make Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) vote to end the child care tax credit for middle-class families in Wisconsin that potentially would raise 1.2 million children out of poverty. Make Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) vote no on paid family leave that even former President Trump supported. Make Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) vote no on funding child care for nearly 300,000 young children in Kentucky so their parents can afford to go back to work.

We have nothing to lose by taking the most popular parts of the Build Back Better Act and turning them into standalone legislation that would put Republicans on record for their votes regarding each of its popular measures. That would give them a real Hobson's choice, where they must decide whether to stick with party leadership's plan to defeat all of President Biden's agenda by voting "no," including on those parts of the agenda that are popular with most Americans. They will take responsibility for their votes at the polls.

By orchestrating this plan effectively, we can run against the recalcitrant Republican Party that says "no" to the president's proposals, regardless of merit, reinforcing our basic message to voters that the only way to get these popular programs approved is to elect more Democratic senators.

This strategy may not be the best for America in the short term, but the Republicans leave us no choice. Their insistence to vote "no" on everything the president proposes is the worst type of politics for our country.

Sen. Sinema's statement on Thursday that she would not support changing the filibuster to pass legislation left most Democrats gloomy, believing there is nothing we can do to enact our agenda. We can - and must - flip the issue and change the narrative to persuade voters of the truth, that Republicans are willing to say "no" to anything proposed by a Democrat even if it might help American families meet the challenges facing them.

America is not well served by the hyperpartisan Republican strategy to derail all of Biden's programs. We must hold the GOP responsible for employing this strategy and ensure that they pay a heavy price for doing so. It is time to fight back, with the same full-fisted vigor they use to attack Democrats (and even their own party members who dare to break from the party's edicts).

It is time to play hardball. Let's roll up our sleeves and fight with every weapon we have available to us, so that the things we believe are necessary for many Americans to prosper will become law.

 

Edward G. Rendell was the 45th governor of Pennsylvania. He is a former mayor of Philadelphia and former district attorney in that city. He served as chairman of the Democratic National Committee during the 2000 presidential election.

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13 hours ago, 24K PureCool said:

Dems really should heavily advertise US passport card. They are a photo ID that can be issued easily at any us post office for like $30 without the ridiculousness of the dmv for a state issued ID.

 

That should mitigate some of the voter ID laws the gop are pushing in most states. 


ID is only part of the problem though. Republicans want to make it so hard to vote that people give up.

 

Moves in Georgia to close polling places -- or make other changes to electoral procedures -- once required advance federal approval under the 1965 Voting Rights Act to ensure they didn't hurt Black and minority voters. 
A Supreme Court ruling in 2013 struck down the heart of that law, however, freeing Georgia and eight other states -- along with a slew of counties and cities in other parts of the country with a history of racial discrimination -- from that federal scrutiny.
But Democratic efforts to pass an updated version of the Voting Rights Act have faltered in the US Senate. Republicans have blocked consideration of any federal voting laws. And the continued reluctance of two Democrats, Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema and West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin, to change Senate rules to allow a straight party-line vote on the measure likely has doomed its chances.
 
 

Full story here:

 

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2 hours ago, 4petesake said:


ID is only part of the problem though. Republicans want to make it so hard to vote that people give up.

 

Moves in Georgia to close polling places -- or make other changes to electoral procedures -- once required advance federal approval under the 1965 Voting Rights Act to ensure they didn't hurt Black and minority voters. 
A Supreme Court ruling in 2013 struck down the heart of that law, however, freeing Georgia and eight other states -- along with a slew of counties and cities in other parts of the country with a history of racial discrimination -- from that federal scrutiny.
But Democratic efforts to pass an updated version of the Voting Rights Act have faltered in the US Senate. Republicans have blocked consideration of any federal voting laws. And the continued reluctance of two Democrats, Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema and West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin, to change Senate rules to allow a straight party-line vote on the measure likely has doomed its chances.
 
 

Full story here:

 

Oh ofcourse but at this point, better to spend resources mitigating effects than fighting a losing battle with Manchin and Sinema's pipe dream of somehow getting re-elected by opposing the Dems at every turn. Their days in the senate are numbered. 

 

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