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USA Politics/Election Thread: Joe Biden, 46th President of the US


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1 minute ago, Gnarcore said:

Anna Kendrick has a wicked sense of humor while Anne Hathaway was pretty meh as Catwoman and comes off a pretentious piece of work. 

But there is something about Hathaway though.  Her eyes?

 

Maybe I've seen more of her movies than Kendrick's.  

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8 minutes ago, Gnarcore said:

Anna Kendrick has a wicked sense of humor while Anne Hathaway was pretty meh as Catwoman and comes off a pretentious piece of work. 

One man’s lunch is the other man’s fantasy.

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2 hours ago, CBH1926 said:

That is true but also some on this list that have immigrated to the U.S like the Vietnamese, Hmong, Albanians, Croats, Cambodians etc. are for the most part war refugees. As someone who went through that process to get to the U.S, they did not ask us about our educational background. Mostly about the war and such things.

Interesting.  If you don't mind me asking what war were you a refugee from?  

 

War refugees are of course a different subject than purely economic migrants.  But even here there is often a tendency towards a wealthier, more educated, more motivated population. 

 

Obviously I'm generalizing, and there are plenty of exceptions to the rule.  But take refugees to the USA from communist regimes, like after the Cuban revolution or the Vietnam War.  If you were a poor peasant you were likely to personally benefit from communism and the land reforms and social programs they instituted (or at least your sucky life would simply remain sucky).  It was generally the upper and middle class landowners, professionals, business owners, and bureaucrats  who fled the regimes.  

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7 minutes ago, Coda said:

Interesting.  If you don't mind me asking what war were you a refugee from?  

 

War refugees are of course a different subject than purely economic migrants.  But even here there is often a tendency towards a wealthier, more educated, more motivated population. 

 

Obviously I'm generalizing, and there are plenty of exceptions to the rule.  But take refugees to the USA from communist regimes, like after the Cuban revolution or the Vietnam War.  If you were a poor peasant you were likely to personally benefit from communism and the land reforms and social programs they instituted (or at least your sucky life would simply remain sucky).  It was generally the upper and middle class landowners, professionals, business owners, and bureaucrats  who fled the regimes.  

War in Bosnia.

Majority of the population lives in St Louis, Chicago, NYC, Jacksonville, Phoenix etc.

TBH a majority of those that came over are from smaller cities and rural areas.

 

They took any jobs that they could get, back in a day if you sat in any Bosnian restaurant In Chicago.

You could see people stopping by for lunch in their work uniforms; painters, janitors, factory workers etc.

 

Fast forward 25 years later, overwhelming number of their kids are very highly educated.

Just looking at a circle of people that I grew up with, lot of university professors, researchers, doctors, engineers etc. 

 

 

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6 hours ago, CBH1926 said:

That is true but also some on this list that have immigrated to the U.S like the Vietnamese, Hmong, Albanians, Croats, Cambodians etc. are for the most part war refugees. As someone who went through that process to get to the U.S, they did not ask us about our educational background. Mostly about the war and such things.

That was my grandmother and grandfather after ww2

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9 hours ago, 4petesake said:

 

Interesting take.
I don’t want to judge anyone’s personal beliefs but this is why religion and politics don’t mix.

Sadly, it's too late for that.  Religion forms much of the underlying fabric of most cultures, and consequently drives the biases (conscious or otherwise) that result in inter-cultural conflict locally, and international conflict globally.

 

Example: Quebec and its "religious symbols" ban - except don't you dare ban the crucifix or other symbols of Christianity from government offices or people of authority, "they're part of the culture!" 

Another example: communist states (past and present) - they claim to be atheist, they claim religion is a poison of the mind, they claim they want to wipe out religion in all its forms, but what they don't tell you is that they're actually attempting to usurp the peoples' religious beliefs with their own form of religion, one that demands - in place of Jesus or Buddha or Flying Spaghetti Monster - absolute loyalty and devotion to the Party.

 

Unfortunately, there aren't many successful examples of truly "secular" or "atheist" cultures that are currently governing a nation, despite how they may declare themselves to be.  That whole "separation of church and state" thing that many governments and jurisdictions like to claim they subscribe to - I don't think it ever really existed, at least not in the true sense of operating without mutual influence.

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18 minutes ago, 6of1_halfdozenofother said:

Sadly, it's too late for that.  Religion forms much of the underlying fabric of most cultures, and consequently drives the biases (conscious or otherwise) that result in inter-cultural conflict locally, and international conflict globally.

 

Example: Quebec and its "religious symbols" ban - except don't you dare ban the crucifix or other symbols of Christianity from government offices or people of authority, "they're part of the culture!" 

Another example: communist states (past and present) - they claim to be atheist, they claim religion is a poison of the mind, they claim they want to wipe out religion in all its forms, but what they don't tell you is that they're actually attempting to usurp the peoples' religious beliefs with their own form of religion, one that demands - in place of Jesus or Buddha or Flying Spaghetti Monster - absolute loyalty and devotion to the Party.

 

Unfortunately, there aren't many successful examples of truly "secular" or "atheist" cultures that are currently governing a nation, despite how they may declare themselves to be.  That whole "separation of church and state" thing that many governments and jurisdictions like to claim they subscribe to - I don't think it ever really existed, at least not in the true sense of operating without mutual influence.

I couldn’t agree more and very, very well-said. Or as Archie Bunker used to say, “That’s some really good thinking right there. I think that that’s the kind of thinking I could have thought of if I would have thought about it.” 
 

Are you able to think of any countries that are even moderately successful at governing without religious influence? 

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5 hours ago, CBH1926 said:

War in Bosnia.

Majority of the population lives in St Louis, Chicago, NYC, Jacksonville, Phoenix etc.

TBH a majority of those that came over are from smaller cities and rural areas.

 

They took any jobs that they could get, back in a day if you sat in any Bosnian restaurant In Chicago.

You could see people stopping by for lunch in their work uniforms; painters, janitors, factory workers etc.

 

Fast forward 25 years later, overwhelming number of their kids are very highly educated.

Just looking at a circle of people that I grew up with, lot of university professors, researchers, doctors, engineers etc. 

 

 

My sincere condolences.

That was more than a war.

Ethnic cleansing,genocidal rape,torture.

I hope you and yours made it through reasonably safely.

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39 minutes ago, 6of1_halfdozenofother said:

Sadly, it's too late for that.  Religion forms much of the underlying fabric of most cultures, and consequently drives the biases (conscious or otherwise) that result in inter-cultural conflict locally, and international conflict globally.

 

Example: Quebec and its "religious symbols" ban - except don't you dare ban the crucifix or other symbols of Christianity from government offices or people of authority, "they're part of the culture!" 

Another example: communist states (past and present) - they claim to be atheist, they claim religion is a poison of the mind, they claim they want to wipe out religion in all its forms, but what they don't tell you is that they're actually attempting to usurp the peoples' religious beliefs with their own form of religion, one that demands - in place of Jesus or Buddha or Flying Spaghetti Monster - absolute loyalty and devotion to the Party.

 

Unfortunately, there aren't many successful examples of truly "secular" or "atheist" cultures that are currently governing a nation, despite how they may declare themselves to be.  That whole "separation of church and state" thing that many governments and jurisdictions like to claim they subscribe to - I don't think it ever really existed, at least not in the true sense of operating without mutual influence.

How do you rule the rulers ?

Tell them there is a god/afterlife and you have connections.

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57 minutes ago, 6of1_halfdozenofother said:

Sadly, it's too late for that.  Religion forms much of the underlying fabric of most cultures, and consequently drives the biases (conscious or otherwise) that result in inter-cultural conflict locally, and international conflict globally.

 

Example: Quebec and its "religious symbols" ban - except don't you dare ban the crucifix or other symbols of Christianity from government offices or people of authority, "they're part of the culture!" 

Another example: communist states (past and present) - they claim to be atheist, they claim religion is a poison of the mind, they claim they want to wipe out religion in all its forms, but what they don't tell you is that they're actually attempting to usurp the peoples' religious beliefs with their own form of religion, one that demands - in place of Jesus or Buddha or Flying Spaghetti Monster - absolute loyalty and devotion to the Party.

 

Unfortunately, there aren't many successful examples of truly "secular" or "atheist" cultures that are currently governing a nation, despite how they may declare themselves to be.  That whole "separation of church and state" thing that many governments and jurisdictions like to claim they subscribe to - I don't think it ever really existed, at least not in the true sense of operating without mutual influence.

Here in B.C. as of  2019 daily prayer changed to prayer and reflection

https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2019/11/30/b-c-legislature-replaces-daily-prayers-with-prayers-and-reflections/

 

Why do we still sing "God keep our land" in our anthem ?

All the fuss about "our sons" but .....but God gets a pass.

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6 hours ago, gurn said:

Here in B.C. as of  2019 daily prayer changed to prayer and reflection

https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2019/11/30/b-c-legislature-replaces-daily-prayers-with-prayers-and-reflections/

 

Why do we still sing "God keep our land" in our anthem ?

All the fuss about "our sons" but .....but God gets a pass.

Not once have I ever sang "God keep our land" in the anthem.  I stick with the version I grew up on

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8 hours ago, Ilunga said:

My sincere condolences.

That was more than a war.

Ethnic cleansing,genocidal rape,torture.

I hope you and yours made it through reasonably safely.

Living under siege for several years was rough and ugly but luckily we survived.

Being surrounded with the mountains was great in peace time as it meant Olympic venues, winter sports, picnics, nature.

In a time of war, it meant being surrounded with artillery that couldn’t miss based on their vantage point.

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2 hours ago, stawns said:

Not once have I ever sang "God keep our land" in the anthem.  I stick with the version I grew up on

Thought they should have changed that part to "We keep our land", just so people understand it might take a bit of work to keep us going, rather than leaving it up to the sky fairy.

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