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Rollie Melanson not returning


PRIMO88

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Saw this posted today, why Rollie is leaving. Family is always a legit reason.


http://vancouversun.com/sports/hockey/nhl/vancouver-canucks/heart-tugs-melanson-home-canucks-losing-rollie-the-goalie-coach

 

 

Rollie Melanson has been all-in as a goalie coach and player in the National Hockey League. He never doubted where he was or what he was doing.

After 35 years in professional hockey, the last six seasons with the Vancouver Canucks, Melanson still knows where he needs to be next. And it is not here. It’s in Shediac, N.B., the lobster fishing town where he grew up, to spend time with his 84-year-old mother, Albertine. And in Montreal, where he’ll figure out with his fiancée, Lyne, what kind of life they’ll live and where.

At age 55, among the best in his highly-specialized profession, Melanson will be leaving the Canucks and could be leaving professional hockey, too.

 

 

“When I played my last year in Montreal, dad was sick,” Melanson said Saturday, referring to the fall of 1991. “He had cancer, lung cancer. And I knew when I shook his hand in September (to leave for training camp), the next time I saw him, he wouldn’t be alive. I would liked to have spent those last six months with dad. But I didn’t have that option. The game is cruel that way.

“With my mom, there’s no way I’m going to let that happen. I want to spend time with her. She’s 84 years old, not getting any younger. Hockey has been my whole life. And it’s been an unbelievable ride. But I know in my heart, this is the best thing to do.”

Melanson has had a tremendous impact on Canuck goaltenders, helping Roberto Luongo reach a new level and helping make Cory Schneider a star. He groomed prospects Eddie Lack and Jacob Markstrom into NHL goalies, and in the last two years worked with veteran Vancouver starter Ryan Miller to improve and modernize a game that was already excellent.

Melanson, who came to the West Coast in 2010 to work for his friend, Alain Vigneault, then survived two head coaching changes, continues to talk with Canuck president of hockey operations Trevor Linden about a revised role that would allow him to live in Atlantic Canada next season.

 

But given Melanson’s passion and belief that the bond required between coach and goalie can’t be built on part-time work or cameo appearances, it seems likely he’ll leave the organization when the his contract expires on July 1.

Melanson, who has two grown sons back east, became engaged to girlfriend Lyne Rousseau three months ago. She has a career with Hydro-Québec in Montreal.

“Lyne and I really need to talk about where we’re going for the next stage of our lives now,” Melanson said. “I’ve always said, doing these jobs, if I’m going to do my job well, I need to be connected to my guys. These jobs aren’t part-time jobs.

“As you know about Trevor … how much respect we have for that man and what he’s trying to do here. (But) really, you’re married to the job. And it’s harder with these jobs to go through the growing pains this team is going to go through the next couple of years. But you still have to do your job well.”

 

Linden said the team wants Melanson to stay but “I fully understand and support Rollie’s priorities with his family.”

Former Canuck goalie Dan Cloutier, who has done most of his coaching work with the Utica Comets and had a significant impact on Markstrom last season, would be the logical choice to replace Melanson in Vancouver.

“We haven’t always agreed on stuff, but he’s such a great person and he loves the game and puts so much time and effort into making you better,” Markstrom said after beating the Edmonton Oilers 4-3 in a shootout Saturday in the Canucks’ final game. “For that, I can’t thank him enough. Even though sometimes you like him less than other days because he works you so hard, I appreciate it now, everything he has done for me.”

 

Melanson is notoriously demanding on his goalies, both in work ethic and technique.

“But we’ve been able to stay connected and keep pushing forward, supporting each other, just being honest,” Melanson said. “I’ve always had great relationships with my goalies. I still text with Jose Theodore, still text with Eddie Lack, Luongo, Schneider. When you build relationships the right way, it’s for life.

 

“That’s the thing I’ll remember most about the game if I decide to walk away this summer. This is like your internal family. But it’s hard. I’m 5,000 miles from home.”

And the people who need him.

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5 hours ago, Z Hockey said:

Melansons replacement: Kirk McLean???

Why didn't I think of it before

It just doesn't feel right to have:

 

Trevor Linden = President of the Organization

 

Kirk McLean = Goalie Coach

 

The disparity in the place on the hierarchy is just so severe that it's kind of insulting.  Plus I don't ever want to hear about Linden firing McLean from a position that low on the totem pole.

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5 hours ago, Kevin Biestra said:

It just doesn't feel right to have:

 

Trevor Linden = President of the Organization

 

Kirk McLean = Goalie Coach

 

The disparity in the place on the hierarchy is just so severe that it's kind of insulting.  Plus I don't ever want to hear about Linden firing McLean from a position that low on the totem pole.

Big deal two former Canucks, Benning was brought in too because Linden and him played together. When was the last time a goaltending coach was fired??....

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13 hours ago, Whale Tail said:

 

Thats harsh. I had to move back to SK for a about a year for a similar situation, and I feel for him. 

 

But I think Dan is a solid replacement, if he's the one that pulled Markstrom out of his funk it makes sense to bring him up as Rollie's replacement. 

 

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On 2016/3/25 at 2:03 PM, ButcherG said:

Its a lot of maybe when you look at Cloutier turning into a good coach. Same with Smyl, same with Vigneault for that matter. None of these guys have ever won a cup.

 

Yes all of them are great guys, but they have never won. This is the inherent problem I see.

 

If you want to create a winner, go out and get winners. They know what it takes to win.

 

Yes the Gretzky experiment failed in Arizona. He never had the pieces to win anything. Vigneault did in Van and NY, and he will never win. Who is the better coach ultimately? Vigneault because he has won more hockey games, but big woop no cup. At least Gretzky has cups from his playing days.

 

My point is go out and get people who have a pedigree for winning cups. From your scouts, to your coaches to your gm. They should all know what it takes to win. Especially when your franchise has never won in its history.

 

Cloutier could become the greatest goalie coach in history. I just wouldn't bet the farm on it, or anything for that matter.

 

 

 

 

How is this relevant to being a good coach or not? This is what our discussion was about. Not about how many cups he won as a player.

 

You were the one that said that someone wouldn't make a good coach if they didn't accomplish anything in their careers. By 'anything', you mean specifically a cup. Well, Gretzky has lots of them and he is a bad coach, plain and simple.

 

You say he had no pieces to work with? The guy was CO-OWNER when he started coaching. He surely had some say about what players to 'buy' or invest in.

 

Gretzky knew so much about how to win that his team was always a bottomfeeder with him at the helm. He was there for six years. What kind of a coach can last that long with a team, while showing zero results?

 

In addition, Edmonton's management, as someone pointed out, is filled with people winning Stanley Cup. Kevin Lowe infamously flaunted his cup ring. Where are they right now? Oh yeah, at the bottom of the standings, yet again this year.

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To play the devil's advocate, the Canucks did hire people based on perceived merit.

 

Linden is president. Yes he's got some say in the matters of team building, but his role is really more of one that oversees the running of hockey ops. Considering he has a wealth of experience as a businessman and is highly respected in the community, I don't think his hiring was that egregious of a decision.

 

Benning is a former Canuck yes, but let's not forget he worked his way up the management totem pole and was one of the most highly sought after candidates for his position.

 

Willie never played for the Canucks.

 

Yes the Canucks are showing some degree of preference for former players, but it's not like they're just handing out those high-power positions to former stars with zero experience. Most Canucks fans did not remember Benning even played for the team, and Linden is arguably a figurehead, a beloved face there to help soothe an irate fanbase when an unpopular decision is made.

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21 hours ago, Alflives said:

How did hiring a series of ex-Oilers work out for that franchise, and their guys were ALL Cup winners?  

Well if I remember correctly McTavish took them to the Stanley Cup finals in 2006... However as a Management figure he was awful.

 

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12 minutes ago, Sedinery33 said:

Well if I remember correctly McTavish took them to the Stanley Cup finals in 2006... However as a Management figure he was awful.

 

I really wonder if the goalies (Demko?) care who the goalie coach is?  

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1 hour ago, Dazzle said:

How is this relevant to being a good coach or not? This is what our discussion was about. Not about how many cups he won as a player.

 

You were the one that said that someone wouldn't make a good coach if they didn't accomplish anything in their careers. By 'anything', you mean specifically a cup. Well, Gretzky has lots of them and he is a bad coach, plain and simple.

 

You say he had no pieces to work with? The guy was CO-OWNER when he started coaching. He surely had some say about what players to 'buy' or invest in.

 

Gretzky knew so much about how to win that his team was always a bottomfeeder with him at the helm. He was there for six years. What kind of a coach can last that long with a team, while showing zero results?

 

In addition, Edmonton's management, as someone pointed out, is filled with people winning Stanley Cup. Kevin Lowe infamously flaunted his cup ring. Where are they right now? Oh yeah, at the bottom of the standings, yet again this year.

Gretzky as a coach was destined to fail. I can only imagine what the practices must have been like, when you have a player asking how to do something that came so naturally to Gretzky. He is so good that he doesn't know how to teach.

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2 hours ago, Alflives said:

I really wonder if the goalies (Demko?) care who the goalie coach is?  

Good coaching to further a players career probably would be something to help in decision making, however if you are set in where you want to play I guess that wouldn't matter.

Only have to go back to last year to find a goalie looking for his best opportunity, and O'Connor said that coaching was a big deal. Not sure who they have in Ottawa, but it was a decider for him

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8 hours ago, Where'd Luongo? said:

Gretzky as a coach was destined to fail. I can only imagine what the practices must have been like, when you have a player asking how to do something that came so naturally to Gretzky. He is so good that he doesn't know how to teach.

Quite possibly, or maybe he would do well because of it.

 

Either way, the experiment should've ended after 2-3 years, at the most. But I guess you can't really fire yourself, if you're a co-owner...

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10 hours ago, Sedinery33 said:

Well if I remember correctly McTavish took them to the Stanley Cup finals in 2006... However as a Management figure he was awful.

 

I kind of think that the Oilers making the final under Mac T was something of a fluke. Not the team making it, but making it with him behind the bench. He really wasn't a great coach. Outside of that one run, he never lead Edmonton anywhere. Him as GM was bad too. I think the Oilers would do better if they cut ties completely with Lowe and MacT. Get them out of there. 

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3 hours ago, HC20.0 said:

I kind of think that the Oilers making the final under Mac T was something of a fluke. Not the team making it, but making it with him behind the bench. He really wasn't a great coach. Outside of that one run, he never lead Edmonton anywhere. Him as GM was bad too. I think the Oilers would do better if they cut ties completely with Lowe and MacT. Get them out of there. 

Yes I agree, if they want future success they have to stop living in the past. The 80s were great, but come on it 2016, and the greats are gone. 

 

Also agree the Mctavish guiding them to the finals was a fluke

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16 hours ago, Dazzle said:

How is this relevant to being a good coach or not? This is what our discussion was about. Not about how many cups he won as a player.

 

You were the one that said that someone wouldn't make a good coach if they didn't accomplish anything in their careers. By 'anything', you mean specifically a cup. Well, Gretzky has lots of them and he is a bad coach, plain and simple.

 

You say he had no pieces to work with? The guy was CO-OWNER when he started coaching. He surely had some say about what players to 'buy' or invest in.

 

Gretzky knew so much about how to win that his team was always a bottomfeeder with him at the helm. He was there for six years. What kind of a coach can last that long with a team, while showing zero results?

 

In addition, Edmonton's management, as someone pointed out, is filled with people winning Stanley Cup. Kevin Lowe infamously flaunted his cup ring. Where are they right now? Oh yeah, at the bottom of the standings, yet again this year.

Wow you really don't stop arguing. And you were the one one who brought Gretzky into this topic.

 

My issue is simple, I don't want Cloutier coaching our goaltenders on an NHL level. I would like our team to find a qualified winning coach to coach our goaltenders.

 

Are you Dan? I am just curious, because this topic was dead two weeks ago.

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