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NHL office taking more control of games


Slegr

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21 hours ago, SabreFan1 said:

I know there's at least one lawyer that peruses CDC.  I wonder if he would know if a clause like that is enforceable.

 

Although, that still doesn't stop a regular person from suing the NHL for any future incidents related to CTE.

I would be surprised if such a clause could exist because it could easily be argued they are not in there right mind when making the decision to go back on the ice. 

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15 hours ago, erkayloomeh said:

I would be surprised if such a clause could exist because it could easily be argued they are not in there right mind when making the decision to go back on the ice. 

I think the question was if it could be put in as a standard clause from a player's first contract to his last contract.  That way, it's agreed to before any NHL related concussions have a chance to come into play.

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On September 14, 2016 at 10:56 PM, apollo said:

That's stupid. They're grown men, let them decide for themselves. They make millions and that aside, if a guy is man enough to want to play through some pain whether it's physical or a concussion which is more than just physical, then let him. 

 

Don't cut out the feet from under a warrior

 

They know the concussion risks when they sign their contracts and lace up the skates. 

As previously stated, knowing concussion risks is a world apart from being able to make a sound decision moments or minutes after being concussed.  

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On 9/15/2016 at 0:40 AM, Slegr said:

I haven't been a fan of the NHL taking control of goal reviews, where we hold our breath and wait to see whether "Toronto" decides if a goal counts. Those calls should be made in-house by referees, perhaps with an option for them to see replays.

 

Now the NHL offices are imposing more control over games with concussion spotters. 

 

Imagine a close playoff game 7 in the third period. Henrik Sedin gets blindsided with a cheap shot. The infraction was missed by the refs. But Henrik took a moment to compose himself. A call from Toronto means Henrik sits in the quiet room for the final key moments. 

 

TSN article:

 

NHL adding more concussion spotters

The Canadian Press

Bill Daly and Gary Bettman, Getty Images

WASHINGTON — The NHL is overhauling its concussion monitoring system.

Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly said the league will have four concussion spotters watching all games from a centralized location in either Toronto or New York, as well as spotters at each game to check for visible symptoms. Those spotters will have the authority to have players removed from games.

"It's a pretty major revamp from what it was last year," Daly said Wednesday. "We're going to have both those (remote and on-site) spotters, plus you have the clubs' medical staffs. We're just building in reinforcements, really, to make the system work better."

Previously, there had been team-affiliated concussion spotters in each arena and they could recommend to medical staffs but not require players be removed from a game.

Daly said the new concussion policy goes into effect for the eight-team World Cup of Hockey, which begins Saturday in Toronto, and that the NHL will release more details closer to the start of the regular season.

"Players get removed for visible signs, and that'll be mandatory removal and that'll be done at the league level," Daly said.

Daly said the concussion spotters will work out of the department of player safety and report to the chief medical consultant and lawyer Julie Grand.

The NHL is in the midst of a concussion lawsuit filed by former players alleging that it had the resources to better prevent head trauma, failed to properly warn players of such risks and promoted violent play that led to their injuries.

Are these concussion spotters Dr's?  Wow - the league should just stay away and let the training staff do their jobs.  The fact they are reporting to a lawyer says it all.

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8 hours ago, IBatch said:

Are these concussion spotters Dr's?  Wow - the league should just stay away and let the training staff do their jobs.  The fact they are reporting to a lawyer says it all.

Yes it does.  As I've been saying, they're afraid of a stream of CTE lawsuits and need to cover their butts.  Lawyers run the front offices and now they are going to have their hands in the on-ice play even more as well.

 

It's a lawsuit happy society and the lawyers are basically the swords and shields.

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2 hours ago, SabreFan1 said:

Yes it does.  As I've been saying, they're afraid of a stream of CTE lawsuits and need to cover their butts.  Lawyers run the front offices and now they are going to have their hands in the on-ice play even more as well.

 

It's a lawsuit happy society and the lawyers are basically the swords and shields.

You do understand that CTE can only be diagnosed in a dead brain right?  Maybe advances in medicine will change this at some point, but there won't be any lawsuits on this topic anytime soon (unless somebody agrees to die for the cause literally).  The Class Action suit against he NHL deals mostly with players put in dangerous situations, after their bells were rung, which is a big reason they have made changes to the rules with hits to the head, and waiting periods after bells are rung.  All players take risks when the lace them up, they know them, and there is an inherent danger in what they do.  Not sure having concussion spotters will be very effective, but if it saves athletes from undue harm I guess it might be worth the effort.

 

Could care a rats ass about the league losing money over concussions, if this happens they most likely were negligent in their responsibilities (ask Bobby Clarke what he thought of Lindros at the time...shake it off and get right back to it! same with Babych who was forced to play with an injury that cost him a few years at the end of his career).   

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48 minutes ago, IBatch said:

You do understand that CTE can only be diagnosed in a dead brain right?  Maybe advances in medicine will change this at some point, but there won't be any lawsuits on this topic anytime soon (unless somebody agrees to die for the cause literally).  The Class Action suit against he NHL deals mostly with players put in dangerous situations, after their bells were rung, which is a big reason they have made changes to the rules with hits to the head, and waiting periods after bells are rung.  All players take risks when the lace them up, they know them, and there is an inherent danger in what they do.  Not sure having concussion spotters will be very effective, but if it saves athletes from undue harm I guess it might be worth the effort.

 

Could care a rats ass about the league losing money over concussions, if this happens they most likely were negligent in their responsibilities (ask Bobby Clarke what he thought of Lindros at the time...shake it off and get right back to it! same with Babych who was forced to play with an injury that cost him a few years at the end of his career).   

Yes, but the lawsuits keep rolling in with the NFL and are beginning to with the NHL regardless of the fact that CTE can only be diagnosed after death.  The NFL has settled most of their lawsuits with a humongous payout towards the players.  Even so, even more lawsuits are coming in.  Eventually they are going to see non-player lawsuits as well between affected ex-spouses as well as regular people who have been the victims of CTE damaged players, alive and dead.

 

You should care about the league losing money.  It always trickles down to the ticket paying public.  Even if you don't go to the games, the attendance for the Canucks is already taking hits because of the team's poor play and if the Canucks' ticket prices go even higher, the attendance will suffer that much more.

 

Remember that the fans will always end up taking the brunt of any league suffering.  They don't do any of this to lose money.

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12 hours ago, SabreFan1 said:

Yes, but the lawsuits keep rolling in with the NFL and are beginning to with the NHL regardless of the fact that CTE can only be diagnosed after death.  The NFL has settled most of their lawsuits with a humongous payout towards the players.  Even so, even more lawsuits are coming in.  Eventually they are going to see non-player lawsuits as well between affected ex-spouses as well as regular people who have been the victims of CTE damaged players, alive and dead.

 

You should care about the league losing money.  It always trickles down to the ticket paying public.  Even if you don't go to the games, the attendance for the Canucks is already taking hits because of the team's poor play and if the Canucks' ticket prices go even higher, the attendance will suffer that much more.

 

Remember that the fans will always end up taking the brunt of any league suffering.  They don't do any of this to lose money.

The amount of money at play here isn't like the NFL, and the NFL  absorbed it because they can, they earn 10 tens what the NHL does.  The issue at hand with players in the lawsuit, is player safety regarding CONCUSSIONS primarily.  CTE is a condition found in boxers/fighters (Probert was found to have it). The NHL has made steps to improve things so there won't likely be a second class action suit (the existing one has a relatively small list of players so far, and isn't going to cost them much more than the a couple gates at one of their Winter Classics or at most maybe this years World Cup of Hockey, so no I don't feel that sorry for them).  I care about ticket prices, but the market dictates this, not the owners, the owners will charge as much as they can regardless.   The owners will pay something out of their coffers at some point to placate a list of lower tiered or almost retired guys a portion of whatever the legal system determines is fair.  Don't expect it to be much.  Guys have insurance for this sort of thing you know - ie Savard, Pronger and co, and all teams pay salaries out for as long as they are on the IR or until their contract is up.  The NHL is only covering their assess, and rightly so, to avoid future lawsuits.  Whats in the books right now isn't going to drive ticket prices up and I do think they should pay these guys, the same way that Bertuzzi settled with Moore.

 

 

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55 minutes ago, IBatch said:

The amount of money at play here isn't like the NFL, and the NFL  absorbed it because they can, they earn 10 tens what the NHL does.  The issue at hand with players in the lawsuit, is player safety regarding CONCUSSIONS primarily.  CTE is a condition found in boxers/fighters (Probert was found to have it). The NHL has made steps to improve things so there won't likely be a second class action suit (the existing one has a relatively small list of players so far, and isn't going to cost them much more than the a couple gates at one of their Winter Classics or at most maybe this years World Cup of Hockey, so no I don't feel that sorry for them).  I care about ticket prices, but the market dictates this, not the owners, the owners will charge as much as they can regardless.   The owners will pay something out of their coffers at some point to placate a list of lower tiered or almost retired guys a portion of whatever the legal system determines is fair.  Don't expect it to be much.  Guys have insurance for this sort of thing you know - ie Savard, Pronger and co, and all teams pay salaries out for as long as they are on the IR or until their contract is up.  The NHL is only covering their assess, and rightly so, to avoid future lawsuits.  Whats in the books right now isn't going to drive ticket prices up and I do think they should pay these guys, the same way that Bertuzzi settled with Moore.

You just want to argue for whatever reason. 

 

Yes the NFL can absorb it.  The NHL, not so much.  Lawsuits could knock the NHL on its butt.  You're disproving part of your own point. 

 

Concussions lead to CTE.  Sooner or later they are going to be able to diagnose CTE to a legal certainty while a person is still alive.

 

The NHL is the most vulnerable sport in regards to getting sued now and into the future to the point where it could end up folding 20 years down the line if it doesn't do something to cover its butt now.  That is why it is instituting this policy.  It has little to do with player safety no matter what the NHL says.  The lawyers that help run the league are doing their job and protecting profits and keeping the lights on.

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On 2016-09-14 at 11:26 PM, apollo said:

Maybe add a clause in their contracts? :s 

won't work

employers cannot contract out of making a safe work place environment

remember this is a sport and a game.. entertainment

don't compare it to police, firemen, paramedics.. who are emergency professionals dealing with real life where controls on the dangers they face is much more difficult to implement

you cannot provide a roofer with a defective ladder, have his contract contain some sort of out clause, and then expect that to stick when the ladder breaks and the employer knew it was flawed..

 

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6 hours ago, SabreFan1 said:

You just want to argue for whatever reason. 

 

Yes the NFL can absorb it.  The NHL, not so much.  Lawsuits could knock the NHL on its butt.  You're disproving part of your own point. 

 

Concussions lead to CTE.  Sooner or later they are going to be able to diagnose CTE to a legal certainty while a person is still alive.

 

The NHL is the most vulnerable sport in regards to getting sued now and into the future to the point where it could end up folding 20 years down the line if it doesn't do something to cover its butt now.  That is why it is instituting this policy.  It has little to do with player safety no matter what the NHL says.  The lawyers that help run the league are doing their job and protecting profits and keeping the lights on.

Ok good points. Don't see anything wrong with instituting a policy that helps player safety.  It will be interesting when this whole suing thing is over, and how that could change our sport...just to be clearer, I am all for any players getting restitution if it is warranted (not sympathetic to the league at all on this point).  The changes to the sport in rules and awareness over the last few years is a win for everyone (nobody should go through what Savard went through, tragic).  That is what I meant by couldn't give a rat's ass about the league having to pay out.  A tad harsh, sorry if it came across the wrong way.  I like your posts, it shows a picture of what could happen if this isn't taken seriously.  which I am pretty sure the leauge has despite Bettman and counsel dodging questions about the link between fighting and concussions...almost comical watching them deny the obvious - it's like if they admit it's true then it will be used against them...But they are paying attention to this despite repeated denials -look what's happened at the grass roots level, 3 fight bans in junior, AHL 10 etc etc, this aspect of the game has taken a huge "hit" over the last two years in all levels.  I am fine with that (sorry Kennedy, I like fights too but don't think we need goons back just yet) and everything else the league has and is doing to cover their assess....I just hope that when it comes time to pay up they do quickly and the ex-players that need the money get what is coming to them, without having the whole thing fall apart of course (which I accept is a worse case scenario,  shared by others in the press).  

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