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Earth sciences or biology?


orcasgonewild

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Hello everyone, I have a pressing question that needs some answering. Im in university currently and im in biology but im thinking about a switch to earth sciences as i have more of an interest there. The problem is Im thinking of becoming a high school teacher and I want to know if theres a demand for either jobs. More so earth sciences as i enjoy it more. Some insight would be great as google isnt helping very much. If any of you are teachers and can give me some advice id love it. After all I just want to become school principal after a couple years of teaching.  Have an awesome thanksgiving everyone!

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If you want to be a high school teacher, go into education program. It's a 4 years bachelors program. 

Of course, you CAN still do a biology degree and then go into the after-degree education program, but it's an extra 2 years. Not efficient.

 

Also, I don't know of any schools that would promote a new teacher to principle after 2 years. I think you have good aspirations but gotta keep your expectations realistic. 

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1 minute ago, JohnLocke said:

If you want to be a high school teacher, go into education program. It's a 4 years bachelors program. 

Of course, you CAN still do a biology degree and then go into the after-degree education program, but it's an extra 2 years. Not efficient.

 

Also, I don't know of any schools that would promote a new teacher to principle after 2 years. I think you have good aspirations but gotta keep your expectations realistic. 

I know many people who are getting or have gotten 4-year bachelor's degrees and are now in the Teaching program, so I didn't even know it was possible to just go for the education straight away. Anyways, I'd personally get some good university level knowledge of a subject before teaching it in a high school, just for comfort reasons. On top of that, the OP seems to enjoy it, so that's a bonus. 

 

Regarding the principle thing, I agree. Two years is extremely quick; I'd expect more like at least 5 years to become a vice principle and then wait for a vacancy after that.

 

Regarding the OP's actual question, I can't say I know if there's more of demand for Biology or Earth Sciences, but I'd guess moreso for Biology. In my school, we had Biology in grades 11 and 12, but Geography only in grade 12.

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Have things changed?  I did a Chemistry degree and then a one year teaching program.

 

As for Earth Sciences or Biology.  If you're becoming a teacher it's not critical, you just need a teachable major.  Once you get your teaching degree you can technically teach anything, you're just more likely to get a job first where your specialties lay.

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I teach at a high school. Learn what your passionate about. The reality is you will teach all of the sciences and other things you HAVEN'T been trained when you become a teacher. Unlike others have suggested, get the degree first!! You never know what can happen to change your mind.

 

And as for aspiring to be a Principal, just like teaching, you got to go into it for the right reasons and you have to really, really like kids....good luck!!

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Ugggggghhhhhh..... just this week there was a guy wanting CDC to decide whether he was a bad person cause he was sleeping with a married woman and now you want us to decide your future career?????? I cant handle the stress this forum put on my life 

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27 minutes ago, Bur14Kes17 said:

Ugggggghhhhhh..... just this week there was a guy wanting CDC to decide whether he was a bad person cause he was sleeping with a married woman and now you want us to decide your future career?????? I cant handle the stress this forum put on my life 

At least this thread is more realistic compared to the other one. Also, they're just asking for advice. It's not like they will make their decision based solely on what is said here.

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Here in the US there is a very high demand for secondary school science teachers. The pay can be pretty good too as you work your way up. You also make more money for the more degrees you have. 

 

If I were you I'd opt for the science degree and the teaching credential afterward, that way you have something more lucrative to fall back on (lab or field work) if teaching doesn't work out. 

 

My vote is for you to go with bio, but I'm biased because that's what my degree was and what I'd like to teach too ::D Here in the states bio majors come a dime a dozen though, so the earth science degree might stand out better. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 10/8/2016 at 3:59 PM, ajhockey said:

I know many people who are getting or have gotten 4-year bachelor's degrees and are now in the Teaching program, so I didn't even know it was possible to just go for the education straight away. Anyways, I'd personally get some good university level knowledge of a subject before teaching it in a high school, just for comfort reasons. On top of that, the OP seems to enjoy it, so that's a bonus. 

 

Regarding the principle thing, I agree. Two years is extremely quick; I'd expect more like at least 5 years to become a vice principle and then wait for a vacancy after that.

 

Regarding the OP's actual question, I can't say I know if there's more of demand for Biology or Earth Sciences, but I'd guess moreso for Biology. In my school, we had Biology in grades 11 and 12, but Geography only in grade 12.

Unless you speak French, there is a really low demand for teachers right now. You'll be lucky if you can get a full time teaching position within 5 years, let alone any kind of principle position. 

 

Biology is a much more respected, yet harder degree to get. One thing to think about though is that it is hard to get into teacher's college. It might be to your advantage to take Earth Sciences, which is the much easier degree. Depends on how good you are at biology. A Bio degree also requires you to do 2nd year level Chem, first year physics, Stats, and Math. So keep that in mind.

 

You might also think about non-teaching things you would consider after school Bio will generally give you every opportunity that Earth Sciences has, but not the other way around. It's also much easier to do a Bio degree and do a bunch of Earth Science electives or even switch into an Earth Sciences program, than the other way around.

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1 hour ago, taxi said:

Unless you speak French, there is a really low demand for teachers right now. You'll be lucky if you can get a full time teaching position within 5 years, let alone any kind of principle position. 

 

Biology is a much more respected, yet harder degree to get. One thing to think about though is that it is hard to get into teacher's college. It might be to your advantage to take Earth Sciences, which is the much easier degree. Depends on how good you are at biology. A Bio degree also requires you to do 2nd year level Chem, first year physics, Stats, and Math. So keep that in mind.

 

You might also think about non-teaching things you would consider after school Bio will generally give you every opportunity that Earth Sciences has, but not the other way around. It's also much easier to do a Bio degree and do a bunch of Earth Science electives or even switch into an Earth Sciences program, than the other way around.

Unless you are here in the Cowichan Valley   http://www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com/news/397003301.html

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1 hour ago, Rush17 said:

Do what interests you.  I'd do earth science! (i'm not a teacher though.  But I am a fan of following your life's interests!  Life's a journey have fun a long the way!)

 

HMm..... also think about your future. Earth Sciences is not considered a hard science. Biology is. In Biology, in addition to theory, you will learn practical science skills. A biology degree will entail taking a bunch of courses you hate but could be worth it in the end, depending on your goals. If you want to teach high school science, learning hard skills, like how to pipette and use beakers properly, will be pretty important.

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11 minutes ago, taxi said:

 

HMm..... also think about your future. Earth Sciences is not considered a hard science. Biology is. In Biology, in addition to theory, you will learn practical science skills. A biology degree will entail taking a bunch of courses you hate but could be worth it in the end, depending on your goals. If you want to teach high school science, learning hard skills, like how to pipette and use beakers properly, will be pretty important.

Valid points.  I'm more of a follow what interests you and let the universe decide what happens.  If you love something enough things often happen that take you too new and unexplored careers and lifestyles. If teaching is 100% what you want to do then a more practical science might be more suitable.  Is teaching at a school or university something you really want to do?  Thats what you need to ask yourself! you can be a teacher in other forms too.  Whether it be from writing books, opening forums on topics (such as earth science and alliterative history), a youtube channel, and much much more.  

 

Find out what setting you want to teach in and follow your dreams.  if you want to go the more practical route follow the harder sciences.  But if your open to alternative ways of living and want to learn more about earth science have at her!

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