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Houston 911 operator accused of hanging up on thousands of calls


nuckin_futz

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Houston 911 operator accused of hanging up on thousands of calls

Crenshanda Williams

Crenshanda Williams, a Houston 911 operator accused of hanging up on thousands of emergency calls, is seen in a police booking photo obtained by CBS Houston affiliate KHOU-TV.

 

HOUSTON -- A Houston 911 operator accused of hanging up on thousands of emergency calls is charged with two counts of interference with an emergency telephone call.

 

Harris County court records show 43-year-old Crenshanda Williams of Houston was charged Oct. 5 and freed on $2,000 bond. She faces a court appearance next week.

 

KPRC-TV reported Williams was involved in thousands of “short calls,” lasting 20 seconds or less, between October 2015 and March. Joe Laud, the Houston Emergency Center administration manager, said Thursday she was placed on indefinite suspension and fired Aug. 4.

 

In one incident, Williams hung up on a caller reporting a robbery in progress at a convenience store. The man called back and spoke to a different operator, but by the time police arrived, the store manager was fatally shot.

 

In another, a security guard reported drivers drag racing, CBS Houston affiliate KHOU-TV reports. Investigators said that Williams hung up moments later. The recording captures her saying “ain’t nobody got time for this. For real.”

 

The Associated Press could not reach Williams for comment; her phone number is not listed and online court records don’t list an attorney to speak on her behalf.

Police said when Williams was questioned in June, she told them she often hangs up on calls because she didn’t want to talk with anyone at that time.

 

One caller, Buster Pendley, said Williams hung up on him March 1 when his wife collapsed and lost consciousness. Pendley said he tried to perform CPR on his wife with one hand while calling 911 with the other.

 

“The 911 operator answered the phone, and she said, ‘This is Crenshanda, may I help you?’” Pendley recalled. He told her his wife had passed out and needed an ambulance, the operator said OK then hung up.

 

He got help after a second 911 call and his wife, Sharon Stephens, survived, but the experience still makes her angry.

 

“I would have gotten from my hospital bed and gone to 911 and find out who did that to me,” she said.

 

If convicted, Williams could be sentenced to up to a year in jail and a $4,000 fine for each count.

 

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/houston-texas-911-operator-accused-hanging-up-thousands-calls/

 

**************************************

 

Firstly who the Hell does this? Taking into account someone may have died from her failure to do her job. What do you guys think is an appropriate penalty for this type of dereliction of duty.

 

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One year, served in full along with a $1 million fine (assuming she hung up on 2,500 911 callers) just doesn't seem enough to me...hopefully during the year she'd serve, she'd be locked up with the nastiest hen in her cell block that will literally make "Crenshenda" her biatch.

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1 minute ago, HK Phooey said:

One year, served in full along with a $1 million fine (assuming she hung up on 2,500 911 callers) just doesn't seem enough to me...hopefully during the year she'd serve, she'd be locked up with the nastiest hen in her cell block that will literally make "Crenshenda" her biatch.

I predict alot of beatings, and alot of guards going "I'm sorry, ain't nobody got time for this, For Real" and "What? I didn't hear ANY-THING, Nope, Not a peep."

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It's negligence plain and simple.

Negligence occurs when:

  • There is a duty to act
  • There is a breach of that duty
  • The breach causes an affect
  • Damage has been inflicted to another

Texas has negligent homicide laws.  If they can prove that her negligence to perform her duty resulted in deaths (which it very well could have seeing as 1 ignored call involved a fatal shooting) she should be charged with negligent homicide.  

In my opinion it is definitely something that prosecutors should be investigating further.

 

 

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1 hour ago, HK Phooey said:

One year, served in full along with a $1 million fine (assuming she hung up on 2,500 911 callers) just doesn't seem enough to me...hopefully during the year she'd serve, she'd be locked up with the nastiest hen in her cell block that will literally make "Crenshenda" her biatch.

 

You did bad math. 2,500 x $4000 = $10,000,000. I think she's screwed... For real.

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14 minutes ago, DJSkingz said:

How does someone like this get a job as a 911 operator???

 

'Murica? God I hope not.

My question - particularly as someone who was a supervisor in a call center at one point who'd had to fire someone for shirking calls - was how it got to even 1000 short calls before they figured out what she was doing.

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Just now, elvis15 said:

My question - particularly as someone who was a supervisor in a call center at one point who'd had to fire someone for shirking calls - was how it got to even 1000 short calls before they figured out what she was doing.

she wasn't the only one shirking her duties obviously

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3 minutes ago, Aircool said:

 

You did bad math. 2,500 x $4000 = $10,000,000. I think she's screwed... For real.

She is only charged with 2 counts, so 2 x $4000 = $8K.  It's not $4k per hangup.

 

Even if she gets the 2 full years, she is getting off easy

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Just now, Kragar said:

She is only charged with 2 counts, so 2 x $4000 = $8K.  It's not $4k per hangup.

 

Even if she gets the 2 full years, she is getting off easy

 

I know. I'm just correcting his math on 2,500 x $4000, which he did incorrectly. You can't honestly be that dumb.

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2 minutes ago, elvis15 said:

My question - particularly as someone who was a supervisor in a call center at one point who'd had to fire someone for shirking calls - was how it got to even 1000 short calls before they figured out what she was doing.

Yep, for sure.  

 

I used to be a CSR.  Some new guy came along, and got jealous of those of us who could handle high call volumes (after months or years of experience), so he started dropping calls periodically to boost his numbers.  Didn't take too long for management to fire his ass.

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1 hour ago, nuckin_futz said:

 

Spoiler

 

Houston 911 operator accused of hanging up on thousands of calls

Crenshanda Williams

Crenshanda Williams, a Houston 911 operator accused of hanging up on thousands of emergency calls, is seen in a police booking photo obtained by CBS Houston affiliate KHOU-TV.

 

HOUSTON -- A Houston 911 operator accused of hanging up on thousands of emergency calls is charged with two counts of interference with an emergency telephone call.

 

Harris County court records show 43-year-old Crenshanda Williams of Houston was charged Oct. 5 and freed on $2,000 bond. She faces a court appearance next week.

 

KPRC-TV reported Williams was involved in thousands of “short calls,” lasting 20 seconds or less, between October 2015 and March. Joe Laud, the Houston Emergency Center administration manager, said Thursday she was placed on indefinite suspension and fired Aug. 4.

 

 

 

In one incident, Williams hung up on a caller reporting a robbery in progress at a convenience store. The man called back and spoke to a different operator, but by the time police arrived, the store manager was fatally shot.


 

Spoiler

 

In another, a security guard reported drivers drag racing, CBS Houston affiliate KHOU-TV reports. Investigators said that Williams hung up moments later. The recording captures her saying “ain’t nobody got time for this. For real.”

 

The Associated Press could not reach Williams for comment; her phone number is not listed and online court records don’t list an attorney to speak on her behalf.

Police said when Williams was questioned in June, she told them she often hangs up on calls because she didn’t want to talk with anyone at that time.

 

One caller, Buster Pendley, said Williams hung up on him March 1 when his wife collapsed and lost consciousness. Pendley said he tried to perform CPR on his wife with one hand while calling 911 with the other.

 

“The 911 operator answered the phone, and she said, ‘This is Crenshanda, may I help you?’” Pendley recalled. He told her his wife had passed out and needed an ambulance, the operator said OK then hung up.

 

He got help after a second 911 call and his wife, Sharon Stephens, survived, but the experience still makes her angry.

 

“I would have gotten from my hospital bed and gone to 911 and find out who did that to me,” she said.

 

If convicted, Williams could be sentenced to up to a year in jail and a $4,000 fine for each count.

 

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/houston-texas-911-operator-accused-hanging-up-thousands-calls/

 

**************************************

 

 

Firstly who the Hell does this? Taking into account someone may have died from her failure to do her job. What do you guys think is an appropriate penalty for this type of dereliction of duty.

 

 

Somebody DID die due to her hanging up on a caller. See bolded and enlarged portion of quoted post. The charges should reflect her negligence and responsibility in hanging up when time was of the essence.

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43 minutes ago, Kragar said:

Yep, for sure.  

 

I used to be a CSR.  Some new guy came along, and got jealous of those of us who could handle high call volumes (after months or years of experience), so he started dropping calls periodically to boost his numbers.  Didn't take too long for management to fire his ass.

I've seen a lot that people will do to try and game the system. Some are smarter than others.

 

I remember a guy we had working for us, seemed to have free time when the center was busy. Decided to just jump onto his line and see if he was getting calls and of course he was just leaving them as dead air and letting them hang up to avoid getting another. That kind of thing happens occasionally, but when you're the only agent standing up on a busy day and you're reading a newspaper, you're going to attract attention.

 

Although in this situation, as a supervisor you should be there to lend support for any calls that come in first and foremost rather than making sure they're not dropping calls intentionally. Sure, you still have to check stats and do some coaching occasionally, but in an essential service making sure everything's working and they have all the help they can get is the most important.

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1 hour ago, elvis15 said:

I've seen a lot that people will do to try and game the system. Some are smarter than others.

 

I remember a guy we had working for us, seemed to have free time when the center was busy. Decided to just jump onto his line and see if he was getting calls and of course he was just leaving them as dead air and letting them hang up to avoid getting another. That kind of thing happens occasionally, but when you're the only agent standing up on a busy day and you're reading a newspaper, you're going to attract attention.

 

Although in this situation, as a supervisor you should be there to lend support for any calls that come in first and foremost rather than making sure they're not dropping calls intentionally. Sure, you still have to check stats and do some coaching occasionally, but in an essential service making sure everything's working and they have all the help they can get is the most important.

Just one more reason you're (slightly) restoring my faith in humanity.

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