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Former Canuck kyle wellwood doesnt like hockey? Shocking.


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Some players need a different type of coaching to succeed. It's just like high school where certain teachers teach a certain way, and reasonably smart kids can look disinterested and not care as much about a course.

I know a few people who were not considered that smart for one reason or another in highschool, but once they went on to post secondary they flourished under the right tutelage. That's why people still talk about coachability, as desired trait for athletes, it makes them able to play under any coach,where as some might only be able to play under a couple styles. It's more important to have a coach with "teachability" if you want to call it that, where they can teach to players in a variety of ways that suit that players needs.

Just thoughts.

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Hockey players are human too. It's nice to see Wellwood being honest. I'm pretty sure there are several players like him, that don't enjoy the game anymore. It's a punishing and physical job. There's a reason there is so much floating going around in regular season. 

 

People who are serious about making fun of the guy are delusional. You don't know how and what it takes. Sometimes, people take things for granted. They truly don't understand the levels of hockey, which is why it's nice to see shows where people get a chance to showcase their skills and compete against pro. It's a different stratosphere level of hockey. People, who claim that they wish they had his talents, need to look at themselves real hard and ask yourself if you can even do your own job. Forget hockey players, who really gives it their all at work? Talk about effort, a lot of guys would rather be homeless than work at Mcdonalds. That's just society is. It's not about, getting the "God" given talent. It's putting in the work and too many young people can't seem to figure it out. 

 

And, who doesn't like food? 

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6 hours ago, luckylager said:

Sorry for only reading the first page, but here's my perspective -

 

My son plays U8 novice hockey and I'm constantly irritated by parents that rag on and pressure their children to be better at hockey.

 

They tell their kids everything they did wrong and all the little things they could do better before asking - "Did you have fun tonight, are you happy with your game, is there anything you're not happy about?"

 

There's a segment of society that put their children into sports, camps etc. and push them too hard, so they can essentially use their child as a status symbol, and I find that disgusting. I hate those parents. On parent-kid night I actually try to injure said as**ole parents "accidentally".

 

Wellwood may well be one of those "trophy kids" that was poked, pinched, prodded and groomed to be a hockey player, regardless of what he wanted, because Daddy needed the ego boost.

 

I see parents pressure their 7-8yr old kids in Novice Hockey. Grade 2-3 kids being scolded for not being able to "focus" or "stay with your check", "shoot more", "don't play the puck", "go to the net". 

 

Sorry to rant, but I'd wager there are hundreds of kids that came through the CHL and dozens that actually made the NHL who don't like playing hockey, because their parents ruined the game for them

Well we've all heard the stories. Johnsons, Hodgsons, O'Sullivans, etc.

 

but maybe not all of them are that bad. Seems like it worked out for Bo Horvat, no? 

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11 hours ago, BCNeil said:

I think it's very common for athletes to not really enjoy what they do.  But if you are good enough to make it to the NHL, you will do it like any other job.

 

Like who would have guessed that Andre Agassi hated playing tennis 

Yeah, I guess it's part of the grind, and not just in sports.

 

When becoming a senior, I had to decide whether to pursue a career in music. However, several professional musicians told me that it lost a lot of its appeal when they were studying it and were forced to grind things they didn't really want to do (secondary instruments etc).

 

They're happy now and are making a living off of it, but I decided not to take the risk and just continue doing it for fun instead. 

 

However, not everyone who makes a lot of money loves their job, and as long as they do what they're paid for, it's fine in my book. It's just sad to see others missing out on their dream because of it.

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2 hours ago, Rey said:

Well we've all heard the stories. Johnsons, Hodgsons, O'Sullivans, etc.

 

but maybe not all of them are that bad. Seems like it worked out for Bo Horvat, no? 

I think his point was that you have several thousand kids having the fun sucked out of the game despite never having much of a shot at actually making the NHL anyway. Its not about who does make the NHL and whether they enjoy it... at least they'll come out with their pockets lined regardless. The problem is the system that has created a bunch of zombie parents that think their kid is the ticket out of the middle class or that the only way their kid will make the NHL is if they live and breathe hockey for 15 years.

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5 hours ago, Derp... said:

Some players need a different type of coaching to succeed. It's just like high school where certain teachers teach a certain way, and reasonably smart kids can look disinterested and not care as much about a course.

I know a few people who were not considered that smart for one reason or another in highschool, but once they went on to post secondary they flourished under the right tutelage. That's why people still talk about coachability, as desired trait for athletes, it makes them able to play under any coach,where as some might only be able to play under a couple styles. It's more important to have a coach with "teachability" if you want to call it that, where they can teach to players in a variety of ways that suit that players needs.

Just thoughts.

So true. Being teachable as a coach is underrated. The best coaches understand each kid is individual and needs to be motivated a little differently. 

 

It also drives me crazy that so many coaches (and parents) think that having fun and working hard are mutually exclusive. Or that it is impossible to hold the kids accountable in a fun environment. Neither of those are true in my experience as a coach in minor hockey.

 

In fact, it's easier for kids to work hard, listen effectively, and take coaching if they are engaged and having fun. And it's easier for coaches to remain objective and supportive when they are also having fun. I find that accountability and discipline also carry much more weight with them  (no one wants to ruin the fun for the team) and they have a much higher willingness to conform to the accepted behaviours of the team when they are having fun and love being at the rink.

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10 minutes ago, wallstreetamigo said:

It also drives me crazy that so many coaches (and parents) think that having fun and working hard are mutually exclusive. Or that it is impossible to hold the kids accountable in a fun environment. Neither of those are true in my experience as a coach in minor hockey.

Yup my experience in coaching kids is similar, always being positive and outgoing = good results from the kids.  But also making sure each and every individual understands the training exercise, even if I have to do 1 on 1.

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1 minute ago, Creepy Crawler said:

Yup my experience in coaching kids is similar, always being positive and outgoing = good results from the kids.  But also making sure each and every individual understands the training exercise, even if I have to do 1 on 1.

Parents (and coaches) often forget that at a basic level the kids actually want to learn and get better. Some kids just have no interest in hockey (which begs the question of why force them to play) but most are actually willing to listen to coaches. But parents often sabotage this instinct in their own kids. 

 

Uncoachable kids are often the result of overbearing parents with unrealistic expectations. It filters down.

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14 hours ago, spliced said:

 

Gretzky is the guy that surprises me the most post playing career. He seemed to be really into hockey while playing but post playing career he seems uninterested and just tells the media what they want to hear. I think a lot of people think Gretzky is aching to get back into hockey in a more serious role but I bet he never does. I'm curious if he burnt out from playing or if he just had a narrow focus where playing drove him in a way that coaching and other stuff just doesn't fire him up. I could see Gretzky being a control freak that can't handle not being on the ice controlling the game himself.

The Great One has expressed that his passion for playing the game ended with his career.  He was the elite of the elite.  Playing against the best the rest of the world had to offer.

He said he puts his skates on like once a year maybe.  There is no drive when you aren't playing against the best opposition.  So shinny and beer league just holds nothing for these guys.

 

Unlike people who me who didn't ever get to play any league of any type.  I love playing and will do so as long as I am able (mid 40's now) Hockey is so much fun and a pleasure to play.  So in my little tiny pond of the world I am playing against the best players I will play against and it's still a challenge.   So it's easy to see why lots of those guys can simply walk away..... and never put on skates again.

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On 2017-02-20 at 3:34 PM, brownky said:

I get 'blah' with playing hockey around February or so... and I play beer league with an additional game on the side. So a max of 3 times a week, usually closer to two on average. No practicing, no coaches telling me 7 days a week 10 months a year what to do.

 

I can see how it would be a grind for many. But when you've invested every moment from probably 12-13 years old until drafted at 18, signed and finally on a roster at 21-24ish Suddenly there are a lot of games on that body already. And it burns up fast. But you've got no other skills... all you've done to this point is play hockey. No college, no uni, no work experience. Just hockey. So it's all hockey...or you're broke. And the lifestyle catches many guys up. Nice cars, nice houses, nice times out. So the money has to roll in. I'd say that part is no different from other jobs, where lifestyle adopts to the salary and how some office punter who makes 200k a year can complain about not having enough $$$.

 

So for all the guys in the AHL who are 'working man salary' - when the ride stops, that's it. Dreaming for the shot in the show... but for most it never comes. And even those who do make it, the grind of day after day after day. The money's great, but if the body is so far gone at 35 that your next 40-50 years are miserable due to random excruciating pain... I can see how guys might not want it. A mile in the shoes.

This. And they wonder why they commit suicide. A lot of the time it's pressure or acceptance that keep them going. But a lot of guys I played with started getting that push from about 6 years old not 12 or 13. I've got old teammates that made the show and others that played in the echl, ahl or in Europe. Lots of them will tell you that at some point there comes a time when you're not playing for fun or yourself. You only play because you get forced to and you're actually only playing for others around you. 

 

 Some of the happiest guys I know were the ones who gave up on the NHL dream and went and played in Europe for about 60,000 pounds/year. I don't think people here have ANY grasp on how challenging mentally it is to make it and I actually would have no idea what it's like to have to deal with it once you're there. 

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15 hours ago, Rey said:

Well we've all heard the stories. Johnsons, Hodgsons, O'Sullivans, etc.

 

but maybe not all of them are that bad. Seems like it worked out for Bo Horvat, no? 

Lol O'Sullivan was finally able to get a restraining order on his dad when he made the ahl. I remember hearing about his dad coming into the dressing room even in juniors and beating on him. That was common in lower levels...but not up there.

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On 2017-02-20 at 6:14 PM, IBatch said:

Benn loves hockey and playing for his country.  No story there.  He slipped through the cracks due to poor scouting while playing in a relatively little covered market.  A lot of teams missed the mark on him.  

Fun fact; in Benn's draft year...all Canucks picks combined to play 0 games in the NHL. Yet I remember in 09 seeing future line ups on forums here where they were pencilled in. Funny how many players bust and funny how fans still think all our prospects will make it and be elite. Same fans, different players that will bust, keep dreaming my fellow canuck fans :) 

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On ‎2‎/‎20‎/‎2017 at 3:02 PM, Brad Marchand said:

Doesn't honestly surprise me given his overall demeanour (not saying this in a disparaging way). Got me wondering what other players have said they didn't like hockey that much. There's an old thread on HFBoards about it: http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=967543

 

Knew about Hull and Daigle beforehand. Jim Carey and Jimmy Carson were a few other notable names.

I think this is true of the majority of the population. Who is lucky enough to get to do to what they are truly passionate about? I know I don't so I take the best paying job that I can get, unfortunately for me that's not pro athlete. Do I like it? not really but its better than sleeping outside and picking my dinner out of some Chinese food restaurants garbage.

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12 hours ago, Standing_Tall#37 said:

Lol O'Sullivan was finally able to get a restraining order on his dad when he made the ahl. I remember hearing about his dad coming into the dressing room even in juniors and beating on him. That was common in lower levels...but not up there.

Yeah hard to believe that there are really $&!#ty parents out there, when I played rugby I witnessed a teammate get slapped and kicked by his own father for not winning the game, he probably did more than just slap in their houes.  We were like "who does that to their kid?".

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45 minutes ago, Creepy Crawler said:

Yeah hard to believe that there are really $&!#ty parents out there, when I played rugby I witnessed a teammate get slapped and kicked by his own father for not winning the game, he probably did more than just slap in their houes.  We were like "who does that to their kid?".

With my generation it was normal. If I had a bad game I'd go home and either have to split firewood for a couple hours or go out to a field and shovel snow into a pile. And you just knew that you didn't refuse or there'd be hell to pay. The happiest day for me was when I made a team down south and got billeted out.

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On 2017-02-20 at 3:15 PM, darkpoet said:

It makes you wonder how many players out there right now are in hockey "just because".

Considering the amount of money we're talking about, this is a really interesting topic. 

I mean, most people would kill to do something they love for a living, even if it meant making less money.... then you have people making TONNES of money, garnering MASSIVE amounts of attention, and all the while basically feeling indifferent about it.

Food for thought. 

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How many Canadian parents are spending 30,000 or more  for their kids  elite hockey program.

Kids playing spring league in BC coming from ontario etc...     Attending private hockey school  / academy like the one in Penticton

 

Just disgusting that families are basically destroying their financial long term  to chase the dream that will 99 %  of the time never happen......

 

Wonder why these guys hate hockey....   Probably pushed hard .. so much pressure to excel after all the money spent by parents...

 

 

 

 

 

 

A year's tuition to PEAC is $53,000. The Okanagan Hockey Academy charges$35,000 a year — more if you're from out of province. Tuition for students living at the Canadian International Hockey Academy is $39,900 a year.Dec 15, 2015

 

 

That does not include mandatory fees such as equipment ($600 to $800), school uniform ($350-$500), textbooks ($300) and $1,000 for such things as orientation week, SAT prep courses and exams.

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