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New Coaching Styles?


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Question:

 

is there a trend towards different coaching styles that we've seen in the past? I'm looking a some successful teams right now:  some have younger(ish)  coaches as opposed to older ones like Ken Hitchcock and others.

 

If there is indeed a new coaching style that is proving successful, what is that change or philosophy?

 

 

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1 hour ago, hammertime said:

Single out your players name names and throw em under the bus to the media seems to be the new style thats becoming popular. I prefer the old school.

Poor Eddy Lack.  Carolina sure buggered his career for him.  Rollie Melanson had him playing well.

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2 minutes ago, Alflives said:

Eddy had a great game yesterday in a 2-1 win.  

He should tell his GM to trade him.  

 

He went from a 0.921 save % over 41 games in Van to 0.901 over 31 his first year in Carolina.  This year, he's yesterday's gagbage with a 0.883 over 11 games.  It's a sad tale.  It's all coaching imo.

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2 hours ago, whytelight said:

Question:

 

is there a trend towards different coaching styles that we've seen in the past? I'm looking a some successful teams right now:  some have younger(ish)  coaches as opposed to older ones like Ken Hitchcock and others.

 

If there is indeed a new coaching style that is proving successful, what is that change or philosophy?

 

 

Who are these young coaches?  

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Thought this was an interesting article on the evolution of coaching in the NHL.  Eric Duhatschek is the author, some interesting perspectives from Scotty Bowman and John Tortorella.  

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/sports/hockey/from-xs-and-os-to-ipads-the-evolution-of-coaching-in-hockey/article34268774/

 

STRATEGY AND TEACHING

The European influence

Bowman, who is the NHL’s all-time leader in coaching wins, joined the ranks early, when a fractured skull forced him to abandon his playing career. In all, he coached 2,141 NHL regular-season games for five teams over 30 seasons and won nine Stanley Cups.

In the mid-1950s he was coaching Junior B when he attended his first Montreal Canadiens camp.

“I’ll never forget. Dick Irvin Sr. was the coach and he drew two lines on the ice to divide the width into thirds,” Bowman recalled. “The left wing had to be to the left of the line, the centre was in the middle, and the right wing had to be to the right of the line. And he was a stickler about it. The centre could move a little, but if you were a left winger, you were responsible for one third of the ice. The same with the right winger.”

Bowman can draw a direct line from that era to 1972, when a team from the Soviet Union that was supposed to offer meek opposition instead pushed the NHL’s greatest players to the limits in a seminal eight-game exhibition series. That opened some coaching eyes to a fresh approach.

 

The entire article is a lot longer, but thought I would quote a tiny piece to whet the appetite of anyone interested.  

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