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The return of Florida man:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/crime/florida-man-stormed-into-police-station-demanding-a-white-cop-hear-his-complaint-then-everything-went-downhill/ar-AA12BXhN?ocid=msedgntp&cvid=c46b508c6b074d9c9fe7b9ee46170602

 to WPLG News 10, a man who came into the South Miami Police Department to accuse a fast food worker spitting on him for using a racial slur was himself arrested after also using racial slurs against Black police officers after demanding a white officer take his complaint, and then later attacking them.

"Body camera video captured 61-year-old Mark Geltzer after South Miami police said he verbally assaulted a 17-year-old cashier at a McDonalds back in July," reported Roy Ramos. "He admitted to calling the cashier a 'useless n-word.' After the incident, police said Geltzer arrived to the department’s lobby to report that the girl working at the fast food restaurant spit on him, accusations police said were unfounded."

Asst. Chief Charles Nanney summed up the situation thusly: "He wasn’t happy about that, he comes to our station here demanding to get a white officer."

 

"Nanney said not only did Geltzer demand a white officer help him, but the assistant chief said the man went on to spew racial slurs toward his senior dispatch manager," WPLG's report continued. "'He gets into an argument with her over getting a new officer and calls her the n-word,' Nanney said. "Nanney said Geltzer was trespassed and told to leave that night."

"Fast forward to this past Friday, when Geltzer returned to the department," said the report. "Surveillance video showed him stumbling into the lobby where he continues on his racist rants, demanding the narrative on his report be changed, Nanney said. 'He calls our senior Black detective the n-word,' Nanney said."

According to the report, Geltzer was armed with gun when he confronted the police the second time, and then when turned away again, tried to run down an officer with his car in the parking lot. At this point his luck ran out; police followed him home to Coral Gables, arrested him, and he was charged with DUI, resisting arrest, and battery on a law enforcement officer.

A number of racial incidents in the Sunshine State have generated national attention in recent months. In September, a man was arrested after trying to run down a prominent Black historian from Florida International University. That same month, a commercial landlord in Miami shouted the N-word at one of his tenants, a former NFL star, who was asking him to test the facilities for mold.

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I very rarely use credit cards. I have always been a cash person and it works very well for me.

 

I encourage people to do the same.

 

Here's some added motivation.

Paying with a credit card? Expect to see a fee when you shop under new rules that start now

https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/credit-card-surcharge-shop-1.6606997

 

While I'm at it. Stop shopping online. 

You don't need to. Get out, hit a mall with cash in hand, support local, help save the planet by reducing all that Amazon impact... transportation/packaging etc..

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Children among at least 36 people killed in child care center massacre in Thailand

Bangkok, Thailand CNN  — 

Thailand recoiled in horror Thursday after at least 36 people were killed, at least 24 of them children, in a massacre at a child care center in northeastern Thailand that is believed to be the country’s deadliest incident of its kind.

 

Authorities immediately launched a manhunt for the suspected attacker, later identified by Thailand’s Central Investigation Bureau (CIB) as Panya Kamrab, a 34-year-old former policeman involved in an ongoing court case for allegedly selling drugs.

 

Investigators later confirmed he had killed his wife and his stepson before taking his own life. The attacker’s wife and children are included in the current death toll.

 

The suspect had appeared in court in Nong Bua Lamphu province hours before “opening fire while the kids were sleeping,” according to Maj. Gen. Jirapob Puridet of the CIB. The former officer was dismissed from duty and “charged with selling narcotics” last year, Puridet told CNN.

 

His 2-year-old stepson was enrolled at the center he attacked Thursday, but was not present while the attack was carried out, according to a local police chief.

 

“(The shooter) went to look for his two-year-old son, but the boy was not there … so he started shooting as well as stabbing people at the nursery,” police spokesperson Maj. General Paisan Luesomboon told CNN.

 

Kamrab then “managed to get into a room where 24 kids were sleeping together,” killing all but one of them.

 

“He also used a knife to stab both children and staff at the center,” Luesomboon said.

 

One of the center’s teachers described a horrific scene to local media, explaining that the attacker entered the center around noon, while two other staff members were having lunch.

 

“I suddenly heard the sound just sounded like fire crackers. So I looked back [and] the two staffs just collapsed on the floor,” the teacher said.

 

“Then he pulled another gun from his waist…I didn’t expect he would also kill the kids,” they said.

 

The teacher also said that the attacker was also carrying a second gun, as well as a knife, which he used to fatally stab another teacher, who was eight months pregnant.

 

One eyewitness told Reuters she believed the attacker was coming to pick up his child. When he arrived to the center, he “didn’t say anything,” and “shot at the door while the children were sleeping,” she said.

 

Most of the deaths were the result of “stabbing wounds,” Luesomboon told CNN. A statement earlier on Thursday from Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha’s office office had referred to the incident as a mass shooting.

 

The massacre took place at the Child Development Center in Nong Bua Lamphu province’s Uthaisawan Na Klang district, according to a statement from the Prime Minister, who called the incident “shocking” and expressed his condolences to the families of the victims.

 

The province, located approximately 540 kilometers (around 335 miles) northeast of Bangkok, is a largely peaceful and quiet area, and is not known for violence.

 

Chan-ocha will travel to the province on Friday to meet with families of the victims, according to a statement from his office.

Police identified the suspect as a 34-year-old former policeman.
Police identified the suspect as a 34-year-old former policeman.

Central Police Investigation

Authorities guard the entrance of the child care center after the massacre unfolded.
Authorities guard the entrance of the child care center after the massacre unfolded.

TPBS/Reuters

Medics arrive at the child care center on Thursday, where more than 30 people, mainly children, were killed.
Medics arrive at the child care center on Thursday, where more than 30 people, mainly children, were killed.

AP

Gun ownership in Thailand is relatively high compared with other countries in Southeast Asia.

 

There were more than 10.3 million civilian owned firearms in Thailand, or around 15 guns for every 100 people, according to 2017 data from the Switzerland-based Small Arms Survey (SAS). Approximately 6.2 million of those guns are legally registered, according to SAS.

 

Thailand ranks as the Southeast Asian country with the second-highest gun homicides after the Philippines, according to the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington’s 2019 Global Burden of Disease database.

 

Mass shootings in the country, however, are rare but a 2020 incident saw a soldier kill 29 people in a shooting spree that began at a military site and then sent shoppers hunting for cover after the gunman entered a mall.

 

The incident sparked international condemnation.

 

In a statement, UNICEF said it was “shocked” by the tragedy and sent its condolences to the families affected. It condemned the attack, saying: “No child should be a target or witness of violence any where, anytime,” adding, “Early childhood development centers, schools and all learning spaces must be safe havens for young children to learn, play and grow during their most critical years.”

 

UK Prime Minister Liz Truss said in a tweet that she was “shocked to hear of the horrific events,” and said that her “thoughts are with all those affected and the first responders.”

 

“The UK stands with the Thai people at this terrible time,” she said.

Edited by nuckin_futz
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27 minutes ago, bishopshodan said:

I very rarely use credit cards. I have always been a cash person and it works very well for me.

 

I encourage people to do the same.

 

Here's some added motivation.

Paying with a credit card? Expect to see a fee when you shop under new rules that start now

https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/credit-card-surcharge-shop-1.6606997

 

While I'm at it. Stop shopping online. 

You don't need to. Get out, hit a mall with cash in hand, support local, help save the planet by reducing all that Amazon impact... transportation/packaging etc..

I can switch back to cash, not an issue.

My current credit card is a cash back type.

While I can see the retailers viewpoint in this; I wonder if they have considered the increased cost of going back to mostly cash?

More trips to the bank- that'll be expensive-especially with the price of  fuel

More cash in the store can lead to more robberies, or employees dipping into the till.

While the interest rates are low, not having an instant transaction, could cost loss of income.

Instant transactions can make your company's bottom line look better immediately, compared to doing a deposit once a week.

 

I'm waiting to see just what charge Telus is going to put on my account, to see if I'll just start paying at the credit union.

If it is more than my cashback, then off to the bank I go.

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1 hour ago, gurn said:

I can switch back to cash, not an issue.

My current credit card is a cash back type.

While I can see the retailers viewpoint in this; I wonder if they have considered the increased cost of going back to mostly cash?

More trips to the bank- that'll be expensive-especially with the price of  fuel

More cash in the store can lead to more robberies, or employees dipping into the till.

While the interest rates are low, not having an instant transaction, could cost loss of income.

Instant transactions can make your company's bottom line look better immediately, compared to doing a deposit once a week.

 

I'm waiting to see just what charge Telus is going to put on my account, to see if I'll just start paying at the credit union.

If it is more than my cashback, then off to the bank I go.

I don't think cash is the major consideration....mostly people will use debit, if they want to avoid the CC surcharge.

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2 hours ago, bishopshodan said:

I very rarely use credit cards. I have always been a cash person and it works very well for me.

 

I encourage people to do the same.

 

Here's some added motivation.

Paying with a credit card? Expect to see a fee when you shop under new rules that start now

https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/credit-card-surcharge-shop-1.6606997

 

While I'm at it. Stop shopping online. 

You don't need to. Get out, hit a mall with cash in hand, support local, help save the planet by reducing all that Amazon impact... transportation/packaging etc..

Sticking to cash where possible and avoiding using credit (including lines of credit) was what helped me pull myself out of seemingly perpetual indebtedness to banks and credit providers.  Credit cards are handy, but using cash as the primary settlement method helped me to be more mindful of what I was purchasing (and their cost), and that in turn ensured I was able to exercise a bit more discipline in my spending...

 

 

 

 

...even if that spending involved getting drunk every Friday and going on trips every year or so for a while there.  :ph34r::ph34r::ph34r:

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5 hours ago, bishopshodan said:

I very rarely use credit cards. I have always been a cash person and it works very well for me.

 

I encourage people to do the same.

 

Here's some added motivation.

Paying with a credit card? Expect to see a fee when you shop under new rules that start now

https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/credit-card-surcharge-shop-1.6606997

 

While I'm at it. Stop shopping online. 

You don't need to. Get out, hit a mall with cash in hand, support local, help save the planet by reducing all that Amazon impact... transportation/packaging etc..


I am a strong proponent for shopping local in principle but not when you get ripped off. I first used Amazon when I needed to replace some landscape lighting. Home Depot charges $8.48 for one 10 watt halogen pin lightbulb. When I checked Amazon I found the exact same bulbs at 10 for $8.98, delivered. Pretty hard to resist when you’re getting 9 more bulbs for 50 cents.

 

Even better I found the LED replacement at 10 bulbs for $20.90 delivered vs 1at $12.97 from HD. The LEDs have already outlasted the halogen and are still going strong so I have reduced electric usage and Amazon usage.

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2 hours ago, 4petesake said:


I am a strong proponent for shopping local in principle but not when you get ripped off. I first used Amazon when I needed to replace some landscape lighting. Home Depot charges $8.48 for one 10 watt halogen pin lightbulb. When I checked Amazon I found the exact same bulbs at 10 for $8.98, delivered. Pretty hard to resist when you’re getting 9 more bulbs for 50 cents.

 

Even better I found the LED replacement at 10 bulbs for $20.90 delivered vs 1at $12.97 from HD. The LEDs have already outlasted the halogen and are still going strong so I have reduced electric usage and Amazon usage.

I hear that. You can only do what you can.

I totally relate to your story regarding light bulbs.

For a few years I was a production coordinator and lighting tech. I actually hired and trained a guy that went on to work the Rogers system for the Canucks. Most of my daywork was programing and servicing intelligent lights but I also had to make sure every bulb in every corner of 3 nightclubs was working. This included dozens of MR16's.

I found the same thing as you. Home Depot etc.. gouge like crazy. Luckly I was in Vancouver and found a small shop on Commercial that was on par with the prices you mention from Amazon. This shop had, or could get you, everything. Then again, thats a perk of a big city.

 

Regarding getting out to a Mall though, besides shopping local being better for the environment vs online shopping, there is more to it than that. Bill Maher had a good peice on it. The Mall is/was the village market place or town hall and that they were our centre of societies.. Where people from all walks of life would mingle. We don't have that anymore....I feel it is a small contribution to why many people are so divided these days. 

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5 hours ago, bishopshodan said:

I hear that. You can only do what you can.

I totally relate to your story regarding light bulbs.

For a few years I was a production coordinator and lighting tech. I actually hired and trained a guy that went on to work the Rogers system for the Canucks. Most of my daywork was programing and servicing intelligent lights but I also had to make sure every bulb in every corner of 3 nightclubs was working. This included dozens of MR16's.

I found the same thing as you. Home Depot etc.. gouge like crazy. Luckly I was in Vancouver and found a small shop on Commercial that was on par with the prices you mention from Amazon. This shop had, or could get you, everything. Then again, thats a perk of a big city.

 

Regarding getting out to a Mall though, besides shopping local being better for the environment vs online shopping, there is more to it than that. Bill Maher had a good peice on it. The Mall is/was the village market place or town hall and that they were our centre of societies.. Where people from all walks of life would mingle. We don't have that anymore....I feel it is a small contribution to why many people are so divided these days. 

People have gotten so lazy it’s not even funny.

Curbside pickup for restaurants, drive through for pharmacies and coffee shops, free deliveries from major retailers, uber eats, shopping services at the store and they bring it to your car, voice activated remotes and tv’s, Alexa, dealerships will pick up your car for repairs, robots serving food in the restaurants, self driving cars etc.

Soon you won’t need to get off the couch anymore.

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6 hours ago, CBH1926 said:

People have gotten so lazy it’s not even funny.

Curbside pickup for restaurants, drive through for pharmacies and coffee shops, free deliveries from major retailers, uber eats, shopping services at the store and they bring it to your car, voice activated remotes and tv’s, Alexa, dealerships will pick up your car for repairs, robots serving food in the restaurants, self driving cars etc.

Soon you won’t need to get off the couch anymore.

34091UNILAD-imageoptim-Wall-E-pixar-3.jpg.31bb608bdb82095e641862ce70fa65be.jpg

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7 hours ago, CBH1926 said:

People have gotten so lazy it’s not even funny.

Curbside pickup for restaurants, drive through for pharmacies and coffee shops, free deliveries from major retailers, uber eats, shopping services at the store and they bring it to your car, voice activated remotes and tv’s, Alexa, dealerships will pick up your car for repairs, robots serving food in the restaurants, self driving cars etc.

Soon you won’t need to get off the couch anymore.

Read EM Forster’s “The Machine Stops”.  I think he wrote it pre 1910.  Very prophetic.  

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23 hours ago, nuckin_futz said:

Children among at least 36 people killed in child care center massacre in Thailand

Bangkok, Thailand CNN  — 

Thailand recoiled in horror Thursday after at least 36 people were killed, at least 24 of them children, in a massacre at a child care center in northeastern Thailand that is believed to be the country’s deadliest incident of its kind.

 

Authorities immediately launched a manhunt for the suspected attacker, later identified by Thailand’s Central Investigation Bureau (CIB) as Panya Kamrab, a 34-year-old former policeman involved in an ongoing court case for allegedly selling drugs.

 

Investigators later confirmed he had killed his wife and his stepson before taking his own life. The attacker’s wife and children are included in the current death toll.

 

The suspect had appeared in court in Nong Bua Lamphu province hours before “opening fire while the kids were sleeping,” according to Maj. Gen. Jirapob Puridet of the CIB. The former officer was dismissed from duty and “charged with selling narcotics” last year, Puridet told CNN.

 

His 2-year-old stepson was enrolled at the center he attacked Thursday, but was not present while the attack was carried out, according to a local police chief.

 

“(The shooter) went to look for his two-year-old son, but the boy was not there … so he started shooting as well as stabbing people at the nursery,” police spokesperson Maj. General Paisan Luesomboon told CNN.

 

Kamrab then “managed to get into a room where 24 kids were sleeping together,” killing all but one of them.

 

“He also used a knife to stab both children and staff at the center,” Luesomboon said.

 

One of the center’s teachers described a horrific scene to local media, explaining that the attacker entered the center around noon, while two other staff members were having lunch.

 

“I suddenly heard the sound just sounded like fire crackers. So I looked back [and] the two staffs just collapsed on the floor,” the teacher said.

 

“Then he pulled another gun from his waist…I didn’t expect he would also kill the kids,” they said.

 

The teacher also said that the attacker was also carrying a second gun, as well as a knife, which he used to fatally stab another teacher, who was eight months pregnant.

 

One eyewitness told Reuters she believed the attacker was coming to pick up his child. When he arrived to the center, he “didn’t say anything,” and “shot at the door while the children were sleeping,” she said.

 

Most of the deaths were the result of “stabbing wounds,” Luesomboon told CNN. A statement earlier on Thursday from Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha’s office office had referred to the incident as a mass shooting.

 

The massacre took place at the Child Development Center in Nong Bua Lamphu province’s Uthaisawan Na Klang district, according to a statement from the Prime Minister, who called the incident “shocking” and expressed his condolences to the families of the victims.

 

The province, located approximately 540 kilometers (around 335 miles) northeast of Bangkok, is a largely peaceful and quiet area, and is not known for violence.

 

Chan-ocha will travel to the province on Friday to meet with families of the victims, according to a statement from his office.

Police identified the suspect as a 34-year-old former policeman.
Police identified the suspect as a 34-year-old former policeman.

Central Police Investigation

Authorities guard the entrance of the child care center after the massacre unfolded.
Authorities guard the entrance of the child care center after the massacre unfolded.

TPBS/Reuters

Medics arrive at the child care center on Thursday, where more than 30 people, mainly children, were killed.
Medics arrive at the child care center on Thursday, where more than 30 people, mainly children, were killed.

AP

Gun ownership in Thailand is relatively high compared with other countries in Southeast Asia.

 

There were more than 10.3 million civilian owned firearms in Thailand, or around 15 guns for every 100 people, according to 2017 data from the Switzerland-based Small Arms Survey (SAS). Approximately 6.2 million of those guns are legally registered, according to SAS.

 

Thailand ranks as the Southeast Asian country with the second-highest gun homicides after the Philippines, according to the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington’s 2019 Global Burden of Disease database.

 

Mass shootings in the country, however, are rare but a 2020 incident saw a soldier kill 29 people in a shooting spree that began at a military site and then sent shoppers hunting for cover after the gunman entered a mall.

 

The incident sparked international condemnation.

 

In a statement, UNICEF said it was “shocked” by the tragedy and sent its condolences to the families affected. It condemned the attack, saying: “No child should be a target or witness of violence any where, anytime,” adding, “Early childhood development centers, schools and all learning spaces must be safe havens for young children to learn, play and grow during their most critical years.”

 

UK Prime Minister Liz Truss said in a tweet that she was “shocked to hear of the horrific events,” and said that her “thoughts are with all those affected and the first responders.”

 

“The UK stands with the Thai people at this terrible time,” she said.

How many lives might have been saved had there been a good guy/girl with a gun? 10? 20? 1?

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Pay Pal maybe facing oblivion, due to weird policy:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/technology/new-paypal-rule-the-company-can-take-2-500-from-your-account-for-sharing-misinformation-update/ar-AA12KrF5?ocid=msedgdhp&pc=U531&cvid=8e373eef658c402f805e2c1bc00c5a76

"Alittle less than a week before the midterm elections in November, a new PayPal account update will take effect that has sent the internet into an uproar — and also drawn condemnation from PayPal’s former president David Marcus.

 

What’s happening: PayPal is updating its acceptable use policy, with the update taking effect on November 3. You might say to yourself, well, I don’t use my account with the financial services company for anything improper or illegal, so what do I have to worry about? Here’s why that might not necessarily be true:

PayPal says it’s expanding its existing list of prohibited activities to include the “sending, posting, or publication of messages, content, or materials that meet certain criteria.” The full details are explained right here, but PayPal is basically set to start levying a fine when users are found to have shared “misinformation” or promoted content that’s deemed to be “discriminatory” or promoting “hate.”

PayPal account update

The list of prohibited activities is broader than that, but it’s especially the prohibition on sharing “misinformation” that’s giving many people pause. Moreover, PayPal gives itself the right to debit $2,500 from your PayPal account for each violation of this new, expanded acceptable use policy.

Marcus, for his part, described this new policy as “insanity.” A tweet from him on Saturday, October 8, reads in part: “A private company now gets to decide to take your money if you say something they disagree with.” Venture capitalist David Sacks chimed in, in response to Marcus: “Get your money out of PayPal right now.” Elon Musk, an erstwhile member of the OG “PayPal Mafia,” also added his approval to Marcus’ tweet, writing simply: “Agreed.”

As word of this PayPal change began to spread over the weekend, FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr described what’s happening here as “Orwellian.”

“PayPal reserves the right to take your money if you post a message that PayPal decides is “misinformation,'” he tweeted. “This is why it is so vital that state and federal legislatures pass laws that prohibit discrimination by tech companies and protect free speech.”

UPDATE (9/8/2022)

  • After this post was published, PayPal released a statement to media outlets insisting that the company will not, in fact, fine users for the dissemination of misinformation: “An AUP notice recently went out in error that included incorrect information. PayPal is not fining people for misinformation and this language was never intended to be inserted in our policy. Our teams are working to correct our policy pages. We’re sorry for the confusion this has caused.”
  •  
  • BUT: As of the time of this writing on Saturday night, October 8, the language noted in the post above is nevertheless still included in PayPal’s user agreement (here). The apology has also struck many people as odd, because you’d think that language like this wouldn’t accidentally materialize — in precisely constructed corporate-speak — on a policy page “in error” or randomly. Especially when PayPal has already more or less gone down this road before, deplatforming account-holders for reasons similar to what this new policy language spells out.
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