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On 6/28/2021 at 5:09 PM, Warhippy said:

The problem is, look at their youth....

 

Pierre Poiliverre

The Conversion happy kid

The kid with homophobic anti abortion stances

 

Their youth ARE the social conservative voice and THAT is the issue.  They don't have conservative youth, they have social Conservative youth and not a damned one of them have actually ever worked.  Literally in office right after school or from church and Poiliverre has literally less job experience than Scheer

Sounds like Swedish politicians on the left and right, they go into the youth core to become career politicians and come out with zero pragmatism and only completely disjointed idealism.

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5 hours ago, RUPERTKBD said:

It's a mess for sure....

 

It's too bad, because I think it's healthy to have that alternative, but they've really crapped the bed here and it might have just killed them. Maybe someone will start up a "Jade" or "Sage" party.....

 

Come to think of it, I bet a lot of stoners would vote for the "Grass" party....B)

1515534306_tenor(3).gif.b6beb7dc5ffc4cda065b28514786d2bf.gif

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  • 2 weeks later...

And more bad news of the Federal Green Party, and who ever wrote this story needs a better proof reader:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/greens-discuss-revoking-leader-annamie-paul-s-membership/ar-AAM9WxH?ocid=msedgntp

Already facing a challenge to her leadership, Green Party Leader Annamie Paul also now faces the prospect of losing her party membership.

Several sources told CBC News that the party's federal council discussed reviewing Annamie Paul's membership during a meeting late Tuesday night. The sources said they could not confirm whether a formal review has been initiated, as the Toronto Star first reported.

It's not clear what revoking Paul's membership would mean for the status of her leadership. According to the party's rules, the leader must be a member in good standing.

Reacting to the latest news, a senior Green party source who supports Paul called the move illegitimate and undemocratic. Paul still faces a non-confidence vote on her leadership later this month.

CBC has reached out to the party and Paul herself for comment. Party spokesperson Rosie Emery would only confirm that an emergency meeting took place last night.

The 'cease-and-desist' letter

The party's code of conduct states that "the executive director will automatically initiate a membership review if a member initiates legal proceedings against the Party."

As first reported by the Journal de Montreal, Paul's lawyer recently sent a cease-and-desist letter to a federal party council member. The letter accused a council member of defamation but no further action was taken. The nature of the alleged comments that prompted the letter are not clear.

Green Party members who undergo a membership review are allowed 30 days to prepare a defence and have the right to be heard before the party's federal council. A simple majority of federal councillors (51 per cent) is all that's required to remove a member, although those ejected have recourse to the party's appeals committee.

Tuesday night's emergency meeting immediately followed a presentation to the membership that showed the party is burning through cash and its expenses are exceeding revenues.

An end-run around the membership?

There are also questions about whether the party will fund Paul's election campaign in the Toronto Centre riding. A motion was tabled at a federal council meeting on June 29 to hold back $250,000 previously earmarked for Paul's own riding campaign.

A senior source in the Green party said some within the party who are unhappy with Paul's leadership are attempting to use a back-door tactic to remove the party's elected leader — something the source said is unconstitutional. The source said it also undermines the legitimacy of the upcoming confidence vote, which was supposed to give party members the final word on Paul's future.

Paul wasn't invited to attend Tuesday night's emergency meeting, although she is a member of the federal council.

Paul is expected to face a non-confidence vote at federal council next Tuesday. The vote was triggered after Paul failed to openly condemn the actions of Noah Zatzman, Paul's former political adviser. Zatzman called out party members online who criticized Paul's position on the Middle East.

%7B© Guy LeBlanc/Radio-Canada Fredericton MP Jenica Atwin split from the federal Green Party to sit as a Liberal.

In May, New Brunswick MPon the Middle East conflict on Twitter, calling it "a totally inadequate statement." Atwin then wrote: "Forced evictions must end. I stand with Palestine and condemn the unthinkable airstrikes in Gaza. End Apartheid."

Soon after, the to state the Greens "will work to defeat you and bring in progressive climate champions who are antifa and pro LGBT and pro indigenous sovereignty and Zionists!!!!!" Calls soon grew for leader Annamie Paul to condemn and remove Zatzman.

In early June, Atwin , stating differences over the party's stance in the Middle East "certainly played a role."

Nearly a week later, the party's top brass held an emergency meeting to discuss removing Paul. After the lengthy session, the attempt.

Instead, federal party council members opted to issue an ultimatum stating that she must publicly support her remaining Green MPs and "repudiate" Zatzman. The consequence of failing to comply would be another no-confidence vote on July 20.

Paul has yet to fully comply with the ultimatum publicly.

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19 minutes ago, gurn said:

And more bad news of the Federal Green Party, and who ever wrote this story needs a better proof reader:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/greens-discuss-revoking-leader-annamie-paul-s-membership/ar-AAM9WxH?ocid=msedgntp

Already facing a challenge to her leadership, Green Party Leader Annamie Paul also now faces the prospect of losing her party membership.

Several sources told CBC News that the party's federal council discussed reviewing Annamie Paul's membership during a meeting late Tuesday night. The sources said they could not confirm whether a formal review has been initiated, as the Toronto Star first reported.

It's not clear what revoking Paul's membership would mean for the status of her leadership. According to the party's rules, the leader must be a member in good standing.

Reacting to the latest news, a senior Green party source who supports Paul called the move illegitimate and undemocratic. Paul still faces a non-confidence vote on her leadership later this month.

CBC has reached out to the party and Paul herself for comment. Party spokesperson Rosie Emery would only confirm that an emergency meeting took place last night.

The 'cease-and-desist' letter

The party's code of conduct states that "the executive director will automatically initiate a membership review if a member initiates legal proceedings against the Party."

As first reported by the Journal de Montreal, Paul's lawyer recently sent a cease-and-desist letter to a federal party council member. The letter accused a council member of defamation but no further action was taken. The nature of the alleged comments that prompted the letter are not clear.

Green Party members who undergo a membership review are allowed 30 days to prepare a defence and have the right to be heard before the party's federal council. A simple majority of federal councillors (51 per cent) is all that's required to remove a member, although those ejected have recourse to the party's appeals committee.

Tuesday night's emergency meeting immediately followed a presentation to the membership that showed the party is burning through cash and its expenses are exceeding revenues.

An end-run around the membership?

There are also questions about whether the party will fund Paul's election campaign in the Toronto Centre riding. A motion was tabled at a federal council meeting on June 29 to hold back $250,000 previously earmarked for Paul's own riding campaign.

A senior source in the Green party said some within the party who are unhappy with Paul's leadership are attempting to use a back-door tactic to remove the party's elected leader — something the source said is unconstitutional. The source said it also undermines the legitimacy of the upcoming confidence vote, which was supposed to give party members the final word on Paul's future.

Paul wasn't invited to attend Tuesday night's emergency meeting, although she is a member of the federal council.

Paul is expected to face a non-confidence vote at federal council next Tuesday. The vote was triggered after Paul failed to openly condemn the actions of Noah Zatzman, Paul's former political adviser. Zatzman called out party members online who criticized Paul's position on the Middle East.

%7B© Guy LeBlanc/Radio-Canada Fredericton MP Jenica Atwin split from the federal Green Party to sit as a Liberal.

In May, New Brunswick MPon the Middle East conflict on Twitter, calling it "a totally inadequate statement." Atwin then wrote: "Forced evictions must end. I stand with Palestine and condemn the unthinkable airstrikes in Gaza. End Apartheid."

Soon after, the to state the Greens "will work to defeat you and bring in progressive climate champions who are antifa and pro LGBT and pro indigenous sovereignty and Zionists!!!!!" Calls soon grew for leader Annamie Paul to condemn and remove Zatzman.

In early June, Atwin , stating differences over the party's stance in the Middle East "certainly played a role."

Nearly a week later, the party's top brass held an emergency meeting to discuss removing Paul. After the lengthy session, the attempt.

Instead, federal party council members opted to issue an ultimatum stating that she must publicly support her remaining Green MPs and "repudiate" Zatzman. The consequence of failing to comply would be another no-confidence vote on July 20.

Paul has yet to fully comply with the ultimatum publicly.

EASy BEING GREEN IT IS NOT | Meme on SIZZLE

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On 6/26/2021 at 3:26 PM, Warhippy said:

Church leadership is about as deaf and insensitive as one can think.

 

In Penticton the catholic church literally got called out and said, well we have no comment on this.  Now their billboard has an "every child matters" banner and it's about as deaf to the situation as one could get.

 

Burning these old icons down does nothing, absolutely NOTHING.  They could be used nation wide as holders of memorials for their past and current evils against first nations and visible minorities world wide but instead some idiot is trying to light the valley on fire by erasing them,

 

Setting up memorials to their sins nation wide would be the best option.  Like it or not they are essential to the history of this country and the first nations people within it, as well as visible minorities and orientations that choose canada as home.

 

They should be marked as historical and made to memorialize the people they abused.

 

We're STILL waiting for something more than flags at half masts or corporations making bank off of orange shirts...

 

Alf, if you don't know by now I sincerely cannot help you.

 

But I will try to point form it

 

  • Churches with government approval stole first nations kids they deemed "heathens" in order to create now catholics
  • The government and churches saw residential schools as a viable option in order to steal land and bring heathens in to line
  • John A MacDonald famously said to beat the savage and breed the savage out of the indian and civilize them.
  • Vital rail routes and resources were safely appropriated by holding first nations children hostage

And so much more...it was genuinely just an awful idea on how to remove and entire people deemed "in the way" at the time

 

I'm still curious when that paradigm shift occured between allegiances between the crown and individual nations.what caused the 180 degree shift in thought process which lead to things like the residential school systems and other forms of government intervention in people's thoughts.

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With an election possibly looming in the near future, it seems that a wealth tax may be one of the major issues.

 

Liberal MP Nathaniel Erskine-Smith has written an opinion piece in the Toronto Star suggesting a one time wealth tax might be order:

 

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/contributors/2021/03/29/taxing-extreme-wealth-to-offset-the-costs-of-the-pandemic-would-be-unquestionably-fair.html

 

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh maintains his call for an ongoing wealth tax:

 

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/singh-waves-off-one-time-wealth-tax-demands-ongoing-tax-on-ultra-rich-canadians-1.5510409

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Green Party cancel leadership non confidence vote--- destroying any remaining confidence I had in them.

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/green-party-confirms-non-confidence-vote-against-leader-annamie-paul-cancelled/ar-AAMkb0P?ocid=msedgntp

"OTTAWA — The Green party has confirmed a planned non-confidence vote against leader Annamie Paul is off the table until at least the next general meeting of members.

 

n a short statement posted to the party website today, the Greens say no further non-confidence motions against Paul will be proposed by the current federal council or before a party convention is held.

Yesterday sources told The Canadian Press that the council had called off the imminent threat to Paul's leadership, but the terms of the decision remained unclear.

The change appears to keep Paul insulated from an ouster until a likely federal election in the coming months, as the party council — its governing body — will turn over on Aug. 20 and no general meeting is on the immediate horizon.

Despite the retreat by party executives who have clashed openly with Paul, tensions remain as Greens struggle to pitch an agenda that has been overshadowed by months of internal strife.

Paul is slated to hold an afternoon news conference in Toronto Centre, the riding she hopes to win for the first time following two unsuccessful attempts.

his report by The Canadian Press was first published July 19, 2021.

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27 minutes ago, gurn said:

Green Party cancel leadership non confidence vote--- destroying any remaining confidence I had in them.

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/green-party-confirms-non-confidence-vote-against-leader-annamie-paul-cancelled/ar-AAMkb0P?ocid=msedgntp

"OTTAWA — The Green party has confirmed a planned non-confidence vote against leader Annamie Paul is off the table until at least the next general meeting of members.

 

n a short statement posted to the party website today, the Greens say no further non-confidence motions against Paul will be proposed by the current federal council or before a party convention is held.

Yesterday sources told The Canadian Press that the council had called off the imminent threat to Paul's leadership, but the terms of the decision remained unclear.

The change appears to keep Paul insulated from an ouster until a likely federal election in the coming months, as the party council — its governing body — will turn over on Aug. 20 and no general meeting is on the immediate horizon.

Despite the retreat by party executives who have clashed openly with Paul, tensions remain as Greens struggle to pitch an agenda that has been overshadowed by months of internal strife.

Paul is slated to hold an afternoon news conference in Toronto Centre, the riding she hopes to win for the first time following two unsuccessful attempts.

his report by The Canadian Press was first published July 19, 2021.

I'll be surprised if they win a single seat.

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4 hours ago, gurn said:

Green Party cancel leadership non confidence vote--- destroying any remaining confidence I had in them.

 

:lol:

 

I'm not sure why but I found your line quite funny.

 

(But, yes, too bad about the Greens.)

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11 minutes ago, UnkNuk said:

:lol:

 

I'm not sure why but I found your line quite funny.

 

(But, yes, too bad about the Greens.)

The people in the party must be heartbroken, especially those that built it from the ground up.

Years and years of work, gone in a couple of months.

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https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/green-leadership-issues-are-behind-the-party-for-now-paul-says/ar-AAMpgod?ocid=msedgntp

Green Party Leader Annamie Paul says questions about her leadership are in the rearview mirror -- for now.

Her sentiments come after party tensions have cooled in recent days. On Sunday, party executives called off a non-confidence vote set to take place this week. Had that vote taken place, it could have kick-started the process of booting Paul from her position as the party's leader.

Read more: Former Green leader Elizabeth May gives full support to Annamie Paul

A party membership review, which was launched last week and would have seen Paul’s membership suspended, has also halted.

"It's certainly great that that has been put behind us for now," Paul said, speaking with host Greg Brady in an interview for 640 Toronto Wednesday morning.

"What we didn't have, and what we have now, is just more certainty or clarity for our candidates, for our volunteers ... about my leadership so that they can plan."

However, she acknowledged that party members will have a chance to consider her leadership after a federal election takes place -- should they still wish to do so.

 

"There are other opportunities for our members to weigh in," she said.

"There's an automatic leadership review ... after a federal election. So members always have the last say."

In the meantime, however, Paul said she remains laser-focused on getting more Green Party candidates elected in the next federal election.

Video: Is the leadership crisis over for Annamie Paul and the federal Green Party?

"I'm not infighting. I'm not feuding. I never have been. I'm focusing on the things that matter," she said.

"Where I'm at, absolutely, 100 per cent, is focusing on getting more Greens elected in the next election."

At the same time, Paul said she doesn't believe Canadians should be heading to the polls, should an election be called, because there's "a lot of work that still needs to be done."

 

Video: Green Party cancels non-confidence vote over Annamie Paul’s leadership (cbc.ca)

 
 
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Green Party cancels non-confidence vote over Annamie Paul’s leadership

"There's still two years in the mandate of this minority government. But if we are then having more Greens elected means that there are more voices that are out there talking about the climate, proposing policy solutions for green recovery," Paul said.

Read more: ‘So racist, so sexist’ — Annamie Paul slams bid to oust her as Green Party leader

A federal election has yet to be called. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has also rejected the rumours that he's on the cusp of dropping the writ, despite rampant speculation from politicians and pundits alike.

Should Canada be plunged into a federal election, the Green Party will be forced to reckon with whatever impact recent months of party infighting have had on their support at the polls.

Paul won the leadership in October of last year with 54 per cent of the vote on the eighth ballot. Paul’s 12,090 votes allowed her to pull ahead of runner-up Dimitri Lascaris in a race that saw 69 per cent of party members vote.

 

 
 
 
Play Video
Green party leader Annamie Paul says she wants to move forward after non-confidence vote scrapped
Click to expand

But less than two months after taking over at the party's helm, Paul started experiencing internal bumps in the road. At the end of November 2020, the party's federal council was sent a letter that alleged a "pattern of poor governance" within the Green Party.

The internal turmoil burst out from behind closed doors when former Green MP Jenica Atwin crossed the floor to join the Liberal Party on June 10, slamming the infighting among the Greens over the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as a “distraction” on her way out.

Paul, however, said Atwin’s departure from the party was the result of conversations that predated this year's flare-up of violence between Israel and Hamas.

Read more: ‘Diversity in politics matter’ — Annamie Paul hopes to push past Green party strife

Some members of the Green Party's governing body, the federal council, held a former advisor of Paul's responsible for Atwin's defection from the Greens to the Liberals. They demanded she repudiate him -- and if she rejected the request, they said they'd conduct a non-confidence vote.

However, Paul has now dodged that bullet, as party members decided on the weekend to turn off the heat and allow the boiling tensions to cool off.

Elizabeth May, who is currently one of the Greens’ only two MPs, also came to Paul's defence in a Tuesday statement.

“I stepped down as leader of the Green Party less than two years ago, despite our best ever results in electing three MPs, knowing it was time for new leadership,” she said in a statement. “That new leader is Annamie Paul.”

 

 
 
 
Play Video
Green Party Leader Annamie Paul isn’t bowing to calls for resignation
Click to expand

Still, May admitted that Atwin’s defection remains “deeply troubling.”

“That loss is painful, but the misplaced anger, blame and name-calling that have followed it are doing even more damage than the event itself,” she said.

May has avoided the spotlight since stepping down as the party’s leader after 13 years at the helm and said she has played no role in the federal council, which has been central in the movement against Paul.

She emphasized that “only members” have the authority to call Paul’s leadership into question.

“We need to pull together for what appears to be an imminent election campaign,” she said.

--With files from Global News' Eric Stober and The Canadian Press

 
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Video story about racism in Canada and, and our attendance at a conference.

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/liberal-anti-racism-summit-criticized-for-who-was-excluded/vi-AAMq7QD?ocid=msedgntp

 

 

The Liberal government started a two-day anti-racism summit with a focus on batling antisemitism, but questions about what action will follow remains and critics say key groups and opposition leaders were excluded.

===================================================================================================

Anti Semitic incidents up by 18.3%  according to B'nai Brith 

totalling more than 2,600 occurrences.

Not good at all.

 

 

Yet just 'ordinary' assault occurs at approx 499.68 per 100,000 people  according to this site

https://www.statista.com/statistics/524500/canada-violent-crime-rate-by-type/

 

5,000 per million x 38=  190,000 assaults per year?

 

tldr

Racism is very bad, but is our focus on the wrong thing?

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The beginning of Stephen Harper's return:

Trial balloon number 1 set free; hopefully popped quickly.

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/poll-stephen-harper-would-change-this-election/ar-AAMs6UV?ocid=msedgntp

We don’t spend enough time indulging hypotheticals. “That would never happen,” as a reason not to think about something, is given way too much room to run these days. Things that would never happen are fun and may be useful to contemplate. It’s in that spirit that Maclean’s asked pollster Greg Lyle what would happen if Stephen Harper led the Conservative Party of Canada into the imminent federal election. The answer, it seems, is: a lot. A lot would happen.

 

A Harper-led Conservative Party would cut the Liberal advantage by two-thirds among decided voters, from a 14-point Liberal lead under current leader Erin O’Toole to a 5-point lead under Harper, according to a new poll for Maclean’s by Lyle’s firm Innovative Research Group.

 

Losing by five points is still losing. But it’s worth recalling that at the beginning of the 2006 election, the real-life historic Harper-led Conservatives were found to be five points behind the Liberals in several polls. Environics, Pollara and the Strategic Counsel all showed the Liberals, led by incumbent Prime Minister Paul Martin, leading the Harper Conservatives by five points in late November 2005. The election campaign began on Nov. 28. By the Jan. 23 vote, the Conservatives had opened up a six-point lead over the Liberals.

That won’t happen again, because as far as we know Harper is retired from politics. But the handy thing about hypothetical questions is the way they illuminate real-world choices. Let’s see what Lyle found.

In the more-nearly-real world of decided voters stating a preference among the parties under their current leaders, Innovative found the Trudeau Liberals lead Erin O’Toole’s Conservatives by 14 points, 41 per cent to 27 per cent. The NDP under Jagmeet Singh is at 17 per cent. Those popular-vote shares would be consistent with a Liberal majority government, since it found Liberal support two points higher and Conservative support five points lower than in the 2015 election, which produced Justin Trudeau’s first majority government.

But then Innovative asked how respondents would vote if Harper came back to lead the Conservatives. In that scenario, Liberal support falls four points to 37 per cent, Conservative support increases five points to 32 per cent, and NDP support falls a hair to 16 per cent. A rout starts to look more like a race.

Innovative found that much of the difference would be explained by voters whose second choice is O’Toole’s Conservatives making Harper’s Conservatives their first choice. With O’Toole as leader, 12 per cent of respondents name the Conservatives as their second choice. With Harper, that second-choice number falls to 6 per cent, but more respondents name the Conservatives as their first choice.

Even now, Harper looks like strong medicine for the Conservatives, and not to everyone’s taste: of respondents who said they expect to vote for O’Toole’s Conservatives, only 87 per cent said they would also vote Conservative if Harper returned as leader. Four per cent of the remaining O’Toole Conservative supporters said they would vote for the NDP instead of for Harper, and another 4 per cent said they’d vote for Maxime Bernier’s People’s Party instead of for a Harper-led party.

But Harper would also attract support that’s not currently available to O’Toole. Of respondents who expect to vote Liberal against O’Toole, 11 per cent said they would switch their vote to the Conservatives if Harper were leader. Harper would also pick up 10 per cent of respondents who are undecided with O’Toole as leader, as well as nearly half—49 per cent—of support for “other” parties. Lyle said this category mostly captures support for the People’s Party and the Maverick Party, parties whose leaders, Maxime Bernier and Jay Hill, were cabinet ministers in Harper governments.

A Harper effect would be felt most strongly in a part of the country where O’Toole probably won’t need much help—the Prairies, where a Conservative lead would increase from 17 points over the Liberals to 28 points—and in a place where the Conservatives would probably need more help than Harper could offer, Quebec. In Quebec the Liberal lead over the Conservatives would shrink from 17 points to 10. In the provinces outside Quebec, a Harper-led party would still trail 12 points behind the Liberals, compared to 19 points with O’Toole as leader.

These are the results of an online survey conducted between July 15th and July 21st. Sample Size: n=834 Canadian citizens, 18 years or older. The results are nationally weighted to n=800 based on Census data from Statistics Canada. Results for Canada are weighted by age, gender, and region to ensure that the overall sample’s composition reflects that of the actual population according to Census data. This is a representative sample. However, since the online survey was not a random probability based sample, a margin of error cannot be calculated.

 

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3 minutes ago, gurn said:

The beginning of Stephen Harper's return:

Trial balloon number 1 set free; hopefully popped quickly.

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/poll-stephen-harper-would-change-this-election/ar-AAMs6UV?ocid=msedgntp

We don’t spend enough time indulging hypotheticals. “That would never happen,” as a reason not to think about something, is given way too much room to run these days. Things that would never happen are fun and may be useful to contemplate. It’s in that spirit that Maclean’s asked pollster Greg Lyle what would happen if Stephen Harper led the Conservative Party of Canada into the imminent federal election. The answer, it seems, is: a lot. A lot would happen.

 

A Harper-led Conservative Party would cut the Liberal advantage by two-thirds among decided voters, from a 14-point Liberal lead under current leader Erin O’Toole to a 5-point lead under Harper, according to a new poll for Maclean’s by Lyle’s firm Innovative Research Group.

 

Losing by five points is still losing. But it’s worth recalling that at the beginning of the 2006 election, the real-life historic Harper-led Conservatives were found to be five points behind the Liberals in several polls. Environics, Pollara and the Strategic Counsel all showed the Liberals, led by incumbent Prime Minister Paul Martin, leading the Harper Conservatives by five points in late November 2005. The election campaign began on Nov. 28. By the Jan. 23 vote, the Conservatives had opened up a six-point lead over the Liberals.

That won’t happen again, because as far as we know Harper is retired from politics. But the handy thing about hypothetical questions is the way they illuminate real-world choices. Let’s see what Lyle found.

In the more-nearly-real world of decided voters stating a preference among the parties under their current leaders, Innovative found the Trudeau Liberals lead Erin O’Toole’s Conservatives by 14 points, 41 per cent to 27 per cent. The NDP under Jagmeet Singh is at 17 per cent. Those popular-vote shares would be consistent with a Liberal majority government, since it found Liberal support two points higher and Conservative support five points lower than in the 2015 election, which produced Justin Trudeau’s first majority government.

But then Innovative asked how respondents would vote if Harper came back to lead the Conservatives. In that scenario, Liberal support falls four points to 37 per cent, Conservative support increases five points to 32 per cent, and NDP support falls a hair to 16 per cent. A rout starts to look more like a race.

Innovative found that much of the difference would be explained by voters whose second choice is O’Toole’s Conservatives making Harper’s Conservatives their first choice. With O’Toole as leader, 12 per cent of respondents name the Conservatives as their second choice. With Harper, that second-choice number falls to 6 per cent, but more respondents name the Conservatives as their first choice.

Even now, Harper looks like strong medicine for the Conservatives, and not to everyone’s taste: of respondents who said they expect to vote for O’Toole’s Conservatives, only 87 per cent said they would also vote Conservative if Harper returned as leader. Four per cent of the remaining O’Toole Conservative supporters said they would vote for the NDP instead of for Harper, and another 4 per cent said they’d vote for Maxime Bernier’s People’s Party instead of for a Harper-led party.

But Harper would also attract support that’s not currently available to O’Toole. Of respondents who expect to vote Liberal against O’Toole, 11 per cent said they would switch their vote to the Conservatives if Harper were leader. Harper would also pick up 10 per cent of respondents who are undecided with O’Toole as leader, as well as nearly half—49 per cent—of support for “other” parties. Lyle said this category mostly captures support for the People’s Party and the Maverick Party, parties whose leaders, Maxime Bernier and Jay Hill, were cabinet ministers in Harper governments.

A Harper effect would be felt most strongly in a part of the country where O’Toole probably won’t need much help—the Prairies, where a Conservative lead would increase from 17 points over the Liberals to 28 points—and in a place where the Conservatives would probably need more help than Harper could offer, Quebec. In Quebec the Liberal lead over the Conservatives would shrink from 17 points to 10. In the provinces outside Quebec, a Harper-led party would still trail 12 points behind the Liberals, compared to 19 points with O’Toole as leader.

These are the results of an online survey conducted between July 15th and July 21st. Sample Size: n=834 Canadian citizens, 18 years or older. The results are nationally weighted to n=800 based on Census data from Statistics Canada. Results for Canada are weighted by age, gender, and region to ensure that the overall sample’s composition reflects that of the actual population according to Census data. This is a representative sample. However, since the online survey was not a random probability based sample, a margin of error cannot be calculated.

 

I don't see it myself but sure.  

 

There's a ton of rumours that Harpers kid who is literally sitting on the Alberta provincial dole for doing less than nothing is going to make a run in to politics.  So...there's that I guess

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7 minutes ago, Warhippy said:

I don't see it myself but sure.  

 

There's a ton of rumours that Harpers kid who is literally sitting on the Alberta provincial dole for doing less than nothing is going to make a run in to politics.  So...there's that I guess

What I find very telling is that Stephen freaking Harper polls better than O'Toole. Great job Conservative Party.

32 million people in Canada and they picked a guy that polls behind the weirdly dressed robot.

 

Harper cowboy.jpg

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Well goodbye Conservative election hopes:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/o-toole-gave-supporters-and-other-party-insiders-taxpayer-funded-contracts/ar-AAMsp8x?ocid=msedgntp

Erin O’Toole's office gave nearly $240,000 worth of taxpayer-funded contracts to Conservative insiders in his first six months on the job, Global News has learned, even while O'Toole and many of his MPs were hammering the Trudeau Liberals for sending taxpayer-funded contracts to Liberal-connected firms.

Moreover, O'Toole has allowed his deputy chief of staff, Steve Outhouse, to continue to operate his own communications business which, among other things, has accepted contracts — paid for with funds donated by party members — to help nine individuals compete in Conservative nomination contests all while continuing his taxpayer-funded employment in the opposition leader's office (OLO).

Global News examined the contract history of the OLO for the first six months of O'Toole's time in office and researched the background of some of the individuals and entities which received those contracts.

The taxpayer-funded contracts, to Outhouse and the others, are a cause for concern among some Conservative MPs and Conservative campaigners who, speaking on the condition of anonymity, believe that the contracts may undermine Conservative charges that the Trudeau Liberals are behaving unethically with federal funds. Some also voiced concerns about the fairness of a top aide to the leader working in nomination fights.

"Someone should remind O’Toole and his team that we are supposed to be the party of accountability," said one Harper-era Conservative now out of politics who was disappointed to learn of the Outhouse arrangement.

As the spring sitting of Parliament was closing, the Conservatives spent much time criticizing the Trudeau Liberals for giving a $75,000 contract to a company owned by Tom Pitfield, a close friend of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

"Mr. Pitfield is not just the Prime Minister’s buddy; he is also married to the former Liberal Party president," O'Toole said in the House of Commons on June 22.  "It certainly pays to be a Liberal insider in Ottawa these days.”

But, according to records published at the House of Commons website, it also appears to pay to be a Conservative insider.

For the last six months of Parliament's fiscal year, ending March 30, which roughly corresponds to O'Toole's first six months as leader, several contracts were awarded to Conservative insiders or entities with close ties to O'Toole's leadership campaign including:

$83,000 to Jim Ross who was in charge of the O'Toole leadership camapaign's field operations. Ross is a senior consultant with a firm called ElectRight which provides voter contact services to candidates and campaigns.

$72,000 to ex-MP Alupa Clarke. Clarke was a Conservative MP from the Quebec City region who won in 2015 but was defeated in 2019. He subsequently became O'Toole's leadership campaign chair in Quebec.

$30,000 to strategic communications consultancy Pathos Strategy whose principals are Dan Robertson and Dimitri Soudas. Robertson play a key advisory role in O'Toole's leadership campaign and was subsquently hired by the OLO to provide communications advice. Soudas is best known as Stephen Harper's longtime communications aide and Quebec advisor.

$20,000 to Katarina Homolova, a public relations advisor who worked in the OLO when Andrew Scheer was leader.

 

Video: Trudeau, O'Toole have fiery exchange over ethics, leadership in House of Commons (Global News)

 
 
 
Play Video
Trudeau, O'Toole have fiery exchange over ethics, leadership in House of Commons
Click to expand

$14,000 to M5 Consulting Group. One of its senior consultants is Supa Meikle who, according to his LinkedIn profile, joined the firm in January a month before he joined O'Toole's OLO as a senior advisor.

$18,000 to Intercede Communication, the firm founded by Outhouse in 2016 to provide communications.

Among other things, Outhouse was chief of staff to Harper-era fisheries minister Gail Shea and then went on to be the campaign manager for Leslyn Lewis' run for leadership of the Conservative Party. O'Toole would win that race but Lewis, who finished third, was a surprisingly strong contender and Outhouse was widely acknowledged within the party for his tactical skill in supporting Lewis' strong finish.

Chelsea Tucker, O'Toole's director of communications, said Outhouse's firm was hired in the fall of 2020 to assist with the transition from Andrew Scheer's leadership to O'Toole's leadership. The decision was subsequently made to offer Outhouse employment as O'Toole's deputy chief of staff.

Video: I’ve been behind in the polls before and I’ve won: O’Toole

But some in the party saw Outhouse's appointment as a nod to the social conservative wing of the party, the wing which Outhouse, a social conservative himself, strongly cultivated during Lewis' campaign.

Neither Tucker nor Outhouse would divulge Outhouse's salary, but those who have worked in opposition leaders' offices say Outhouse is likely earning between $140,000 and $160,000 a year, paid for out of the House of Common budget.

But Outhouse's firm, Intercede, could be earning $50,000 to $75,000 a year — or more — for providing services to help nomination contestants win the right to be a Conservative standard-bearer in the next general election.

"The House of Commons administration was consulted and in accordance with the rules and the guidance given, Mr. Outhouse’s business continued to work on nominations," Tucker said in an e-mail. "Mr. O’Toole is a firm believer in fair nominations. All staff are welcome to participate in the democratic process if they so choose as long as it doesn't interfere with their work obligations and they don't use any parliamentary resources."

The Conservative Party of Canada runs the party's nomination contests — vetting candidates, setting election dates, and so on — and is administratively separate from the OLO, where Tucker works. Questions put to the party about the appropriateness of a deputy chief of staff getting involved, for a fee, in party nomination contests were not answered.

Outhouse would not disclose the identify of his clients but, in a brief email, confirmed that Intercede was hired to provide website development, email and calling services for nine different nomination contestants. Global News has contacted other providers of similar services who say that a nomination contestant, regardless of the party, could expect to pay a consultancy like Intercede anywhere between $5,000 and $15,000 for those kinds of services depending on the complexity of the nomination contest. Those fees would not be paid by taxpayers but would be paid by the donors to each nomination campaign.

Canada's elections laws put a cap on spending by nomination contestants of $25,000 per contestant per race.

Multiple sources say one of Intercede's clients is Toyin Crandell, who is among four individuals seeking the Conservative nomination in the Ontario riding of Simcoe North. Simcoe North is held by the retiring Bruce Stanton and is widely seen as one of the safest Conservative seats in Ontario.

Global News has not yet been able to reach Crandell. Crandell, the daughter of a Christian pastor, is also believed to be supported by the social conservative wing of the party. Indeed, Lewis herself has endorsed Crandell's candidacy as has Edmonton-area MP Garnett Genuis, an MP with strong social conservative credentials.

Read more: Conservative leadership race: Brad Wall commends Saskatchewan’s Leslyn Lewis supporters

During the leadership race as well as in the just concluded Parliamentary session, it was clear that those who call themselves social conservatives had different values and priorities than some others in the party, particularly on issues such as  right-to-die legislation and the conversion therapy ban. That occasionally produced some tension within the Conservative parliamentary caucus.

That O'Toole's deputy chief of staff was working at what one Conservative described as "a side hustle" to bring more social conservatives into the caucus has raised eyebrows among some MPs and others in the party who spoke to Global News on condition of anonymity.

Outhouse said that of the nine clients his firm provided services to for nomination contests, three were winners, three were losers, and the other three have yet to finish. And, he said, not all would characterize themselves as social conservaties. Indeed, one of those -- not a social conservative -- is Melissa Lantsman, who is the nominated Conservative candidate in the Toronto-area riding of Thornhill. Lantsman confirmed that she used Intercede to win her nomination contest.

The Simcoe North Conservative nomination is also being contested by Adam Chambers, a former aide to former Conservative finance minister Jim Flaherty, who, coincidentally, is described as "a close personal friend" of O'Toole's.

The Simcoe North race nomination contest will wrap up this weekend.

 
 
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On 7/22/2021 at 10:58 PM, gurn said:

Well goodbye Conservative election hopes:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/o-toole-gave-supporters-and-other-party-insiders-taxpayer-funded-contracts/ar-AAMsp8x?ocid=msedgntp

Erin O’Toole's office gave nearly $240,000 worth of taxpayer-funded contracts to Conservative insiders in his first six months on the job, Global News has learned, even while O'Toole and many of his MPs were hammering the Trudeau Liberals for sending taxpayer-funded contracts to Liberal-connected firms.

Moreover, O'Toole has allowed his deputy chief of staff, Steve Outhouse, to continue to operate his own communications business which, among other things, has accepted contracts — paid for with funds donated by party members — to help nine individuals compete in Conservative nomination contests all while continuing his taxpayer-funded employment in the opposition leader's office (OLO).

Global News examined the contract history of the OLO for the first six months of O'Toole's time in office and researched the background of some of the individuals and entities which received those contracts.

The taxpayer-funded contracts, to Outhouse and the others, are a cause for concern among some Conservative MPs and Conservative campaigners who, speaking on the condition of anonymity, believe that the contracts may undermine Conservative charges that the Trudeau Liberals are behaving unethically with federal funds. Some also voiced concerns about the fairness of a top aide to the leader working in nomination fights.

"Someone should remind O’Toole and his team that we are supposed to be the party of accountability," said one Harper-era Conservative now out of politics who was disappointed to learn of the Outhouse arrangement.

As the spring sitting of Parliament was closing, the Conservatives spent much time criticizing the Trudeau Liberals for giving a $75,000 contract to a company owned by Tom Pitfield, a close friend of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

"Mr. Pitfield is not just the Prime Minister’s buddy; he is also married to the former Liberal Party president," O'Toole said in the House of Commons on June 22.  "It certainly pays to be a Liberal insider in Ottawa these days.”

But, according to records published at the House of Commons website, it also appears to pay to be a Conservative insider.

For the last six months of Parliament's fiscal year, ending March 30, which roughly corresponds to O'Toole's first six months as leader, several contracts were awarded to Conservative insiders or entities with close ties to O'Toole's leadership campaign including:

$83,000 to Jim Ross who was in charge of the O'Toole leadership camapaign's field operations. Ross is a senior consultant with a firm called ElectRight which provides voter contact services to candidates and campaigns.

$72,000 to ex-MP Alupa Clarke. Clarke was a Conservative MP from the Quebec City region who won in 2015 but was defeated in 2019. He subsequently became O'Toole's leadership campaign chair in Quebec.

$30,000 to strategic communications consultancy Pathos Strategy whose principals are Dan Robertson and Dimitri Soudas. Robertson play a key advisory role in O'Toole's leadership campaign and was subsquently hired by the OLO to provide communications advice. Soudas is best known as Stephen Harper's longtime communications aide and Quebec advisor.

$20,000 to Katarina Homolova, a public relations advisor who worked in the OLO when Andrew Scheer was leader.

 

Video: Trudeau, O'Toole have fiery exchange over ethics, leadership in House of Commons (Global News)

 
 
 
Play Video
Trudeau, O'Toole have fiery exchange over ethics, leadership in House of Commons
Click to expand

$14,000 to M5 Consulting Group. One of its senior consultants is Supa Meikle who, according to his LinkedIn profile, joined the firm in January a month before he joined O'Toole's OLO as a senior advisor.

$18,000 to Intercede Communication, the firm founded by Outhouse in 2016 to provide communications.

Among other things, Outhouse was chief of staff to Harper-era fisheries minister Gail Shea and then went on to be the campaign manager for Leslyn Lewis' run for leadership of the Conservative Party. O'Toole would win that race but Lewis, who finished third, was a surprisingly strong contender and Outhouse was widely acknowledged within the party for his tactical skill in supporting Lewis' strong finish.

Chelsea Tucker, O'Toole's director of communications, said Outhouse's firm was hired in the fall of 2020 to assist with the transition from Andrew Scheer's leadership to O'Toole's leadership. The decision was subsequently made to offer Outhouse employment as O'Toole's deputy chief of staff.

Video: I’ve been behind in the polls before and I’ve won: O’Toole

But some in the party saw Outhouse's appointment as a nod to the social conservative wing of the party, the wing which Outhouse, a social conservative himself, strongly cultivated during Lewis' campaign.

Neither Tucker nor Outhouse would divulge Outhouse's salary, but those who have worked in opposition leaders' offices say Outhouse is likely earning between $140,000 and $160,000 a year, paid for out of the House of Common budget.

But Outhouse's firm, Intercede, could be earning $50,000 to $75,000 a year — or more — for providing services to help nomination contestants win the right to be a Conservative standard-bearer in the next general election.

"The House of Commons administration was consulted and in accordance with the rules and the guidance given, Mr. Outhouse’s business continued to work on nominations," Tucker said in an e-mail. "Mr. O’Toole is a firm believer in fair nominations. All staff are welcome to participate in the democratic process if they so choose as long as it doesn't interfere with their work obligations and they don't use any parliamentary resources."

The Conservative Party of Canada runs the party's nomination contests — vetting candidates, setting election dates, and so on — and is administratively separate from the OLO, where Tucker works. Questions put to the party about the appropriateness of a deputy chief of staff getting involved, for a fee, in party nomination contests were not answered.

Outhouse would not disclose the identify of his clients but, in a brief email, confirmed that Intercede was hired to provide website development, email and calling services for nine different nomination contestants. Global News has contacted other providers of similar services who say that a nomination contestant, regardless of the party, could expect to pay a consultancy like Intercede anywhere between $5,000 and $15,000 for those kinds of services depending on the complexity of the nomination contest. Those fees would not be paid by taxpayers but would be paid by the donors to each nomination campaign.

Canada's elections laws put a cap on spending by nomination contestants of $25,000 per contestant per race.

Multiple sources say one of Intercede's clients is Toyin Crandell, who is among four individuals seeking the Conservative nomination in the Ontario riding of Simcoe North. Simcoe North is held by the retiring Bruce Stanton and is widely seen as one of the safest Conservative seats in Ontario.

Global News has not yet been able to reach Crandell. Crandell, the daughter of a Christian pastor, is also believed to be supported by the social conservative wing of the party. Indeed, Lewis herself has endorsed Crandell's candidacy as has Edmonton-area MP Garnett Genuis, an MP with strong social conservative credentials.

Read more: Conservative leadership race: Brad Wall commends Saskatchewan’s Leslyn Lewis supporters

During the leadership race as well as in the just concluded Parliamentary session, it was clear that those who call themselves social conservatives had different values and priorities than some others in the party, particularly on issues such as  right-to-die legislation and the conversion therapy ban. That occasionally produced some tension within the Conservative parliamentary caucus.

That O'Toole's deputy chief of staff was working at what one Conservative described as "a side hustle" to bring more social conservatives into the caucus has raised eyebrows among some MPs and others in the party who spoke to Global News on condition of anonymity.

Outhouse said that of the nine clients his firm provided services to for nomination contests, three were winners, three were losers, and the other three have yet to finish. And, he said, not all would characterize themselves as social conservaties. Indeed, one of those -- not a social conservative -- is Melissa Lantsman, who is the nominated Conservative candidate in the Toronto-area riding of Thornhill. Lantsman confirmed that she used Intercede to win her nomination contest.

The Simcoe North Conservative nomination is also being contested by Adam Chambers, a former aide to former Conservative finance minister Jim Flaherty, who, coincidentally, is described as "a close personal friend" of O'Toole's.

The Simcoe North race nomination contest will wrap up this weekend.

 
 

I don't know that having an advisor with the name "Outhouse" is necessarily a good thing... I mean, think of it - the name is too easily associated with being "full of $&!#".  :bigblush:

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On 7/22/2021 at 5:52 PM, gurn said:

The beginning of Stephen Harper's return:

Trial balloon number 1 set free; hopefully popped quickly.

Trial balloon number two:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/stephen-harper-says-canada-s-pandemic-spending-has-been-overkill-in-podcast-appearance/ar-AAMDhBh?ocid=msedgntp

The Canadian government has spent irresponsibly in its attempt to fend off the economic disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, according to former prime minister Stephen Harper.

"It's not a good reaction, it's been overkill," Harper said on an episode of the podcast American Optimist, which was released on Tuesday.

"This is bad macroeconomic policy on an enormous scale."

The podcast, which launched about a month ago, bills itself as "an alternative to the fear, cynicism and zero-sum thinking in mainstream media."

Harper appeared on the podcast with host Joe Lonsdale in Texas. The description of the podcast says the interview was recorded before the current COVID-19 resurgence in the United States but does not say exactly when.

Lonsdale is the founder of the venture capital firm 8VC, which Harper joined as an adviser in 2017.

Harper, who served as Conservative prime minister from 2006 to 2015, touched on a wide range of topics during the nearly 40-minute interview, including Canada's response to the pandemic, the rise of "woke" culture and the dangers of an emboldened China on the world stage.

Harper described Canada's spending strategies as short-sighted and said the massive levels of borrowing could spur dangerous levels of inflation.

In addition to questioning the Trudeau government's spending policies, Harper also suggested the country's vaccine rollout was slowed due to lacklustre execution and the government's poor relationships with drug companies.

"When we were in government, we never had any trouble or problem making sure we had vaccinations and vaccines well in advance of getting them distributed," Harper said. "So it's just a matter of competent execution."

Harper sounds alarm over growing 'woke' movement

Harper also took aim at what he called the "woke university crowd" for its attempts to tear down American and Western values.

"I'm just fascinated by this notion that is just everywhere now, the so-called woke notion that America is a fundamentally racist country," he said. "And yet what I see is all of these supposedly repressed races trying desperately to become Americans and to join the United States.

"It's not that there aren't problems, historical and present, that are real, but the core of our countries are great, they have great futures and there is no alternative."

Harper said the modern political left has become "entirely nihilist" and appears more interested in tearing down existing systems than in upholding and improving upon traditional democratic values.

Canada, allies, should push back against China: Harper

On the topic of China, Harper said the international community has been too hesitant to push back against the country, especially after its crackdown on pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong and its imposition of new national security laws.

China's actions in Hong Kong have "flagrantly violated" its promise to allow the region to operate under a separate political system until 2047, he said.

"I would have urged our allies to respond more forcefully to that," Harper said. He suggested that Canada and its allies could have moved to formally recognize the government of Taiwan in response to China's actions in Hong Kong.

Harper also said he is increasingly concerned that China will take military action against Taiwan in an attempt to squash its government and claim the island.

China attacking Taiwan was unimaginable, he said, but today "I no longer think that's the case."

 

 
 
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