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21 minutes ago, Jimmy McGill said:

dunno, my brother in law is 70 and won't stop working because he can't figure out what to do with his free time. He'll die in his work boots.

 

My wife and I decided a while ago to invest more in real estate than the market, in part because the returns were ridiculous but we also want to retire early with no debt at all and make our monthly expenses very easy to manage. 

I left my previous career, after 25 years, because I realized I was earning $5.40 an hour for working above what my pension is paying.

I no longer start work at 5:20 in the morning- yay me.

found a  supposedly part time job with the school board as a custodian. Currently working almost full time hours, again. I teeter back and forth about that being a good thing or not; biut it is helping pay the mortgage off fast.

 Some folk at my old job are earning $2 hr. compared to pension and can't either see the math, or just want out of the house for 8 hrs a day.?

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1 hour ago, Jimmy McGill said:

thats also a good reality check for people who don't know how pensions work and how big funds have to be to pay out even small pensions. I've met too many people that just don't understand where their money comes from. 

When i crunched some numbers on my wife and I drawing $1129 each per month on CPP it came to $677,450 to fund this amount. Based on a 4% draw rate. OAS was $360,870. That draw rate doesn't touch the principal and doesn't account for inflation. CPP is funded but OAS is a budget line cost to the feds. 

 

Where the feds will really cash in will be the draw down on RRSP's. 

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22 minutes ago, gurn said:

 Some folk at my old job are earning $2 hr. compared to pension and can't either see the math, or just want out of the house for 8 hrs a day.?

There's also a lot to be said for having a sense of self-worth through ongoing responsibilities such as maintaining employment (even if it doesn't make much financial sense).  Sometimes, people would rather "keep busy" than focus on the financials, even if keeping busy means losing money in the long run due to expenses such as commuting and vehicle maintenance. 

 

The sense of purpose and the feeling of self-worth that comes with it can be an important motivator to do things that may not make rational financial sense.

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23 minutes ago, 6of1_halfdozenofother said:

There's also a lot to be said for having a sense of self-worth through ongoing responsibilities such as maintaining employment (even if it doesn't make much financial sense).  Sometimes, people would rather "keep busy" than focus on the financials, even if keeping busy means losing money in the long run due to expenses such as commuting and vehicle maintenance. 

 

The sense of purpose and the feeling of self-worth that comes with it can be an important motivator to do things that may not make rational financial sense.

I get that. Which is why when I finally stop earning money I'll volunteer to drive older folk to shopping and Doctor appointments.

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1 hour ago, Boudrias said:

When i crunched some numbers on my wife and I drawing $1129 each per month on CPP it came to $677,450 to fund this amount. Based on a 4% draw rate. OAS was $360,870. That draw rate doesn't touch the principal and doesn't account for inflation. CPP is funded but OAS is a budget line cost to the feds. 

 

Where the feds will really cash in will be the draw down on RRSP's. 

its really something when you do the math. The average CPP contribution doesn't come anywhere near that number, and yet I've met people (mostly NDP) that think that their contributions alone are what's paying their CPP and pensions. Its frustrating to me as a left-leaning person socially that the left has so little understanding of Canada's investment potential that just gets pissed away in missed opportunities, or worse, just ring up that old debt to pay for your "free" dental. 

 

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1 hour ago, gurn said:

I left my previous career, after 25 years, because I realized I was earning $5.40 an hour for working above what my pension is paying.

I no longer start work at 5:20 in the morning- yay me.

found a  supposedly part time job with the school board as a custodian. Currently working almost full time hours, again. I teeter back and forth about that being a good thing or not; biut it is helping pay the mortgage off fast.

 Some folk at my old job are earning $2 hr. compared to pension and can't either see the math, or just want out of the house for 8 hrs a day.?

thats a good move. Nice guaranteed floor from the pension and you can then go do what you want, with a take it or leave it approach too. 

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1 hour ago, Jimmy McGill said:

its really something when you do the math. The average CPP contribution doesn't come anywhere near that number, and yet I've met people (mostly NDP) that think that their contributions alone are what's paying their CPP and pensions. Its frustrating to me as a left-leaning person socially that the left has so little understanding of Canada's investment potential that just gets pissed away in missed opportunities, or worse, just ring up that old debt to pay for your "free" dental. 

 

Well I am a fiscal conservative and I see no real discussion of a serious note on the right either. What ever happened to a reasoned cost/benefit analysis? A simplified 

pros/cons list. IMHO the average guy will never get ahead until accountability is established. 

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5 hours ago, Warhippy said:

I consider myself lucky.  

 

It took a long time to drop the dead weight from my life and I am not nor ever will be interested in picking up more like yourself :)

 

So yay me

I apologize

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1 hour ago, Boudrias said:

Well I am a fiscal conservative and I see no real discussion of a serious note on the right either. What ever happened to a reasoned cost/benefit analysis? A simplified 

pros/cons list. IMHO the average guy will never get ahead until accountability is established. 

I still personally believe we will never see accountability until such time as those salaries, expense accounts and pensions are tied to economic performance, social standards and the general health and wellbeing of the populace

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No real proper place for this story, so I'm parking it here. The age of online disinformation has created another set of "alternative facts" and although this particular incident takes place in Alberta, it isn't limited to any one province...or country, for that matter:

 

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/stopping-a-virus-alberta-judge-again-rebukes-woman-who-claims-magna-carta-invalidated-canadian-law/ar-BB1c7wtz?li=AAggFp4
 

Quote

 

In an unusual ruling three months ago, an Alberta judge made it clear Jacquie Robinson was on thin ice.

If she continued to threaten the courts with her bizarre, “pseudo law” claims about the Magna Carta and treasonous judges and governments, the legal system would not sit idly by, promised Justice Robert Graesser of the Court of Queen’s Bench.

As a first step, he banned the woman from continuing to represent a mother embroiled in a bitter child-custody dispute.

It seems Robinson – who likes to go by the pseudonym Jacquie Phoeni x – was unmoved.

She responded by sending additional hostile letters to court staff, likening them to war criminals and suggesting that they could be tried and face life in prison.

Meanwhile, some of her movement’s thousands of followers have been peppering other police and government agencies in Canada and the U.K. with similar oddball claims and threats.

Now Graesser has issued a second ruling , one that’s particularly topical as conspiracy theories like QAnon and false claims about the pandemic, vaccines and U.S. election fraud spread widely.

The judge warned generally about the perils of various “fakery” being broadcast over the Internet, where “there are no filters to distinguish between fact and fiction.”

Then he imposed fresh sanctions on Robinson, barring her from representing anyone in the province’s legal system or sending correspondence to the courts claiming authority based on her strange Magna Carta theory.

The judge also suggested she may have broken criminal laws against intimidating justice officials, and threatened to cite her for contempt of court if she didn’t heed his cautions.

“This may appear to be the use of a sledgehammer to crush an ant,” wrote Graesser. “I would instead use the analogy of an inoculation to stop a virus.”

“These schemes are nothing more than cons, led by people who rely and feed on the oft-quoted statement attributed to P.T. Barnum (of circus fame): a sucker is born every minute,” the judge added. “(But) the Courts are not suckers. And the Courts will not be intimidated.”

Alberta’s legal system, though, is not alone in being targeted.

The Magna Carta group’s Facebook page, which claims 34,000 members, includes letters from various British and Canadian government entities responding to members’ challenges. One U.K. municipality says a follower’s assertions did not allow the person to avoid paying property tax. Another voices disappointment that “you continue to write in an intemperate manner, specifically threatening to arrest me.”

Ottawa lawyer Richard Warman , who has long fought extremism online, said it’s time law enforcement investigated what he called Robinson’s “psychotic attacks” on the courts.

The danger is that someone acts on Robinson’s rhetoric in a violent way, he said, as happened with a different brand of “sovereign law” proponent who murdered an Ottawa tax judge and two other people in 2007.

“You’re threatening a judge with the gallows, and now you’re threatening court clerks, arguing they’re comparable to Nazi war criminals. And that’s not OK,” Warman said. “The police need to step in to defend the integrity of the judicial system.”

Robinson, who’s in the U.K. meeting with other followers of the movement, was unrepentant when reached Friday, calling the courts a “criminal corporation.”

“My notices are not threatening,” she told the National Post via text. “They state the Law and the penalty for breaking that Law.”

On her group’s Facebook page Robinson warns that her “grand fannaly” (sic) is coming soon. “Greasser are you ready for your arrest?” she wrote about the judge. “We sure are.”

Robinson is a proponent of “Practical Lawful Dissent,” a convoluted theory the court ruling describes simply as “nonsense.”

It revolves around the Magna Carta — the 13th-Century accord between England’s King John and noblemen — and specifically its article 61. That provision said a committee of barons could strip John of assets if he violated the agreement.

The section was removed a year later, in 1216, and Canada adopted its own, independent constitution almost 40 years ago. Even in the U.K., the Magna Carta is a mostly historical document today, a great symbol of democracy whose specific content has been largely replaced over the centuries.

But 28 British lords invoked defunct article 61 in a failed, 2001 attempt to prevent the ratification of a European Union treaty. As a result, the movement claims, all governments and laws throughout the Commonwealth are now invalid.

The concept may sound too absurd to be taken seriously, but the Alberta woman has already done tangible damage, the judge notes.

The mother Robinson represented had wanted greater access to her daughter. Now she’s charged with abducting the girl to the U.S., and is wanted for failing to appear in court.

“After joining with Ms. Robinson and her group, (the mother) no longer has any access to her daughter,” the judge noted.

The movement has gained little traction elsewhere, either. One of the letters posted on its Facebook page is from the federal Justice Department , responding to a member’s missives demanding that the Canadian military be made available to “protect the realm” against a treasonous regime.

The author politely rejects the request, noting that the Magna Carta is of no force or effect in Canada and the letters “reflect no legal process known to Canadian jurisprudence.”

 

:picard:

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Canada has rejected Shandong's bid for TMAC gold mining

Tue 22 Dec 2020 02:05:27 GMT

 

Shandong Gold Mining had bid for TMAC Resources

Canada's federal government ordered a national security review under the Investment Canada Act (Canada) 
 
The government has rejected the bid. 
 
---
TMAC Resources Inc. is a Canadian-based mining company. 
Shandong Gold Group is a state-owned Chinese gold mining company. 
Relations between Canada and China are already under strain, this may well add to the tensions.
 
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14 hours ago, nuckin_futz said:

Relations between Canada and China are already under strain, this may well add to the tensions.

 

Oh yeah?  Well, Xi Jinping can kiss my fat hairy Cantonese-Canadian ass!  :gocan:

 

Seriously though, I'm hoping that I get to see the eradication of the ccp within my lifetime.  Ideally, replaced by a government chosen by representative democracy and one that gives proper recognition/respect of human rights, and without too much bloodshed in the replacement process.

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29 minutes ago, 6of1_halfdozenofother said:

Oh yeah?  Well, Xi Jinping can kiss my fat hairy Cantonese-Canadian ass!  :gocan:

 

Seriously though, I'm hoping that I get to see the eradication of the ccp within my lifetime.  Ideally, replaced by a government chosen by representative democracy and one that gives proper recognition/respect of human rights, and without too much bloodshed in the replacement process.

Winnie the Pooh - Blood by macawnivore on DeviantArt

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On 12/21/2020 at 7:20 PM, nuckin_futz said:

Canada has rejected Shandong's bid for TMAC gold mining

Tue 22 Dec 2020 02:05:27 GMT

 

Shandong Gold Mining had bid for TMAC Resources

Canada's federal government ordered a national security review under the Investment Canada Act (Canada) 
 
The government has rejected the bid. 
 
---
TMAC Resources Inc. is a Canadian-based mining company. 
Shandong Gold Group is a state-owned Chinese gold mining company. 
Relations between Canada and China are already under strain, this may well add to the tensions.
 

It's probably smart china controls it's resources and doesn't let them to leave the country why should we.

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Canada Cabinet reshuffle Tuesday - hinting at an early election?

Tue 12 Jan 2021 04:32:37 GMT

 

Canadian media report that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is expected to reshuffle cabinet on 12 January 2021. 

The reports cites unnamed sources saying the moves will address those in the cabinet who won't run again in the next election. And hence is aimed at making the government 'election ready'. 
 
Last week Trudeau said an early election could be called this year. Given the huge cash outlays already happening (not just in Canada, all over the globe) a potential election raises the prospect of further spending promises - this could well pose a risk to the CAD.
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@nuckin_futz uggh I really hope not. I'm done with elections.. give us a year off damnit. We just got through BC's early elections, still dealing with the after effects of USA's sh!tshow of an election.. the last thing people are going to have patience for is another election, with more spending promises, and more money and energy spent on the election rather than governing. There is still a lot of work to do in 2021.

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2 minutes ago, I.Am.Ironman said:

@nuckin_futz uggh I really hope not. I'm done with elections.. give us a year off damnit. We just got through BC's early elections, still dealing with the after effects of USA's sh!tshow of an election.. the last thing people are going to have patience for is another election, with more spending promises, and more money and energy spent on the election rather than governing. There is still a lot of work to do in 2021.

Oct 2019 was the last election. This is a minority government and they usually last only 2 years. That gets you to Oct 2021.

 

And yes, everyone has election fatigue.

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1 hour ago, nuckin_futz said:

Oct 2019 was the last election. This is a minority government and they usually last only 2 years. That gets you to Oct 2021.

 

And yes, everyone has election fatigue.

In a perverse sort of way, if a Federal election is in fact called, especially voluntarily by the Liberals, I hope that all 5 of the existing parties (Liberals, Tories, BQ, NDP, and Green) don't each capture more than 22-23% of the seats in Parliament.  That would force whoever becomes PM to have to work to secure not just her/his own party's support, but also the support of at least two of the other parties in Parliament.

 

To me, that would be the perfect example of the electorate giving all of the politicians the collective middle finger.  You want to earn your parliamentary pension?  Be less of a politician and more of a parliamentarian.  Work across party lines and stop the idiotic bickering and political posturing.

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Couldn't find a/the thread on residential schools so I'll leave this here:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/supreme-court-denies-appeal-in-mount-cashel-sexual-abuse-case-in-n-l/ar-BB1cK6r0?ocid=msedgdhp

ST. JOHN'S, N.L. — The Supreme Court of Canada has refused a bid by the Roman Catholic archdiocese in St. John's to appeal a ruling that found it liable for sexual abuse at the former Mount Cashel orphanage.'

 

Thursday's court decision ends a legal battle that first shook Newfoundland and Labrador decades ago. It also determines once and for all that the church has a responsibility to the victims of the abuse that took place at the notorious former orphanage, at the hands of the Christian Brothers in the 1950s.

Geoff Budden, the victims' lawyer, said the archdiocese will have to pay about $2 million, divided among the four lead plaintiffs in the case. There are dozens more victims, Budden said in an interview Wednesday, adding that a process will be set up to determine how much they may be entitled to.

St. John's archdiocese issued a statement Thursday saying it will not comment on the court's decision until it had reviewed it with lawyers.

"The archdiocese of St. John's has immense sympathy for those who suffered abuse at Mount Cashel Orphanage," the statement said. "We ask that all join with us in praying for healing for those who suffer as a result of the abuse."

The public first learned about the sexual abuse that occurred at the orphanage in the 1980s. Following a public inquiry into the abuse, known as the Hughes inquiry, several Brothers were prosecuted and convicted. Mount Cashel was closed in 1990 and demolished in 1992.

The legal battle began in December 1999 and Budden estimates he's been in court 30 or 40 times to see the case through. The victims, who were boys at the time of the abuse, are now in their 70s and 80s.

After a winding series of court cases, which included the North American branch of the Christian Brothers order filing for bankruptcy, the Newfoundland and Labrador Court of Appeal determined in July that the city’s Roman Catholic Episcopal Corporation was liable for the abuse.

In September, the archdiocese of St. John's applied to the Supreme Court for leave to appeal that decision, saying the ruling sets a precedent with “profound implications” for its future operations.

As is custom, the court did not provide a reason for its decision to deny the request.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 14, 2021.

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18 minutes ago, gurn said:

Couldn't find a/the thread on residential schools so I'll leave this here:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/supreme-court-denies-appeal-in-mount-cashel-sexual-abuse-case-in-n-l/ar-BB1cK6r0?ocid=msedgdhp

ST. JOHN'S, N.L. — The Supreme Court of Canada has refused a bid by the Roman Catholic archdiocese in St. John's to appeal a ruling that found it liable for sexual abuse at the former Mount Cashel orphanage.'

 

Thursday's court decision ends a legal battle that first shook Newfoundland and Labrador decades ago. It also determines once and for all that the church has a responsibility to the victims of the abuse that took place at the notorious former orphanage, at the hands of the Christian Brothers in the 1950s.

Geoff Budden, the victims' lawyer, said the archdiocese will have to pay about $2 million, divided among the four lead plaintiffs in the case. There are dozens more victims, Budden said in an interview Wednesday, adding that a process will be set up to determine how much they may be entitled to.

St. John's archdiocese issued a statement Thursday saying it will not comment on the court's decision until it had reviewed it with lawyers.

"The archdiocese of St. John's has immense sympathy for those who suffered abuse at Mount Cashel Orphanage," the statement said. "We ask that all join with us in praying for healing for those who suffer as a result of the abuse."

The public first learned about the sexual abuse that occurred at the orphanage in the 1980s. Following a public inquiry into the abuse, known as the Hughes inquiry, several Brothers were prosecuted and convicted. Mount Cashel was closed in 1990 and demolished in 1992.

The legal battle began in December 1999 and Budden estimates he's been in court 30 or 40 times to see the case through. The victims, who were boys at the time of the abuse, are now in their 70s and 80s.

After a winding series of court cases, which included the North American branch of the Christian Brothers order filing for bankruptcy, the Newfoundland and Labrador Court of Appeal determined in July that the city’s Roman Catholic Episcopal Corporation was liable for the abuse.

In September, the archdiocese of St. John's applied to the Supreme Court for leave to appeal that decision, saying the ruling sets a precedent with “profound implications” for its future operations.

As is custom, the court did not provide a reason for its decision to deny the request.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 14, 2021.

Its never too late to seek justice.   Its also maddening how long it took in this case.  Sometimes, trying to run out the clock is a strategy by defendants who know they are going to lose.   

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