Jump to content
The Official Site of the Vancouver Canucks
Canucks Community

Vehicle Purchase Question


NucksPatsFan

Recommended Posts

Hey all, 

 

I have a family member who is in a bit of a pickle and was wondering if anyone here had any experience with this situation:

 

She owned a brand new sedan that she bought (a 2016) that she's been financing for a few years and was just looking at different dealerships to see what there is out there in terms of trading in her car for another one. 

 

She was at a dealership (I won't name names as I don't want to place blame) and got caught in the "sales guy tactics" where she went just to look, and accidentally let it slip there was a specific car she had been eyeing more than others, and he (the sales guy) just stuck to that. The sales guy and the financing girl were asking her a lot of questions about what she can afford, etc. etc. and all her employment history and salary etc. They told her she could have the car she mentioned at X dollars per month financing and they would take in her current car, and started printing out a bunch of forms etc etc.

 

She was frazzled, overwhelmed and just felt pressured and was recalling some information wrong. She didn't have any pay stubs on her so when they asked how much she makes monthly she recalled incorrectly and actually gave a number higher than what the real number is. 

 

Long story short: She's now got a car that she can't afford the monthly payments on, that the financing was approved on the premise of fake income numbers (not intentionally, she just honestly couldn't remember and they were wanting a number out of her), and she just wants her old car back and to reverse the "Trade in" as if it never happened. It's been less than 24 hours since this has all gone down.

 

I've advised her to just honestly explain the situation to the manager, but she's worried she might just get sales pitched into even more stuff. I told her I'd go with her, so I was hoping to see if there is any "ammunition" I can bring with me. 

 

 

One thought I had: Just call the bank they finance through and tell them that hey, you approved it based on non-factual numbers and there will be no money in the account for you to take. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, NucksPatsFan said:

Hey all, 

 

I have a family member who is in a bit of a pickle and was wondering if anyone here had any experience with this situation:

 

She owned a brand new sedan that she bought (a 2016) that she's been financing for a few years and was just looking at different dealerships to see what there is out there in terms of trading in her car for another one. 

 

She was at a dealership (I won't name names as I don't want to place blame) and got caught in the "sales guy tactics" where she went just to look, and accidentally let it slip there was a specific car she had been eyeing more than others, and he (the sales guy) just stuck to that. The sales guy and the financing girl were asking her a lot of questions about what she can afford, etc. etc. and all her employment history and salary etc. They told her she could have the car she mentioned at X dollars per month financing and they would take in her current car, and started printing out a bunch of forms etc etc.

 

She was frazzled, overwhelmed and just felt pressured and was recalling some information wrong. She didn't have any pay stubs on her so when they asked how much she makes monthly she recalled incorrectly and actually gave a number higher than what the real number is. 

 

Long story short: She's now got a car that she can't afford the monthly payments on, that the financing was approved on the premise of fake income numbers (not intentionally, she just honestly couldn't remember and they were wanting a number out of her), and she just wants her old car back and to reverse the "Trade in" as if it never happened. It's been less than 24 hours since this has all gone down.

 

I've advised her to just honestly explain the situation to the manager, but she's worried she might just get sales pitched into even more stuff. I told her I'd go with her, so I was hoping to see if there is any "ammunition" I can bring with me. 

 

 

One thought I had: Just call the bank they finance through and tell them that hey, you approved it based on non-factual numbers and there will be no money in the account for you to take. 

omg I had the same thing happened to me, I just came to look at the car for a trade-in , and literally they thought i was buying the car blah blah, they had the insurance guy at the scene for me to take the car home that day, I told the dealership and car sales guy. I DID NOT AGREE TO ANY THING YET! , they said yea you did, im like no i did not. so apparently they already processed the insurance to the car already, but luckily i didnt sign any papers... they told me to take the car home for the day and bring it back to cancel the insurance...

 

the next day i went into cancel the insurance and the sales guy was trying to give me an alternative to buying another car that was suitable and affordable.. ( at this point i wanted to get my old car back and leave) so i started to play around with them and wasted their time took some cars for test drives and such.. when it came down to them sitting with me and talk about financials.. I told them that I WANT MY CAR BACK RIGHT NOW ! 

 

they said," is there anything that we can do to get a car ?" im like "NO!, I JUST WANT MY CAR BACK!" Just straight yelled at them... I got my old car back and drove outta there...

 

Just DEMAND YOUR CAR BACK AND STAND YOUR GROUND thats my advice to you guys !

 

DONT GET PUSHED AROUND WITH THESE GUYS.. ALL THEY WANT IS YOUR MONEY AND THEIR COMMISSION

 

Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, NucksPatsFan said:

Hey all, 

 

I have a family member who is in a bit of a pickle and was wondering if anyone here had any experience with this situation:

 

She owned a brand new sedan that she bought (a 2016) that she's been financing for a few years and was just looking at different dealerships to see what there is out there in terms of trading in her car for another one. 

 

She was at a dealership (I won't name names as I don't want to place blame) and got caught in the "sales guy tactics" where she went just to look, and accidentally let it slip there was a specific car she had been eyeing more than others, and he (the sales guy) just stuck to that. The sales guy and the financing girl were asking her a lot of questions about what she can afford, etc. etc. and all her employment history and salary etc. They told her she could have the car she mentioned at X dollars per month financing and they would take in her current car, and started printing out a bunch of forms etc etc.

 

She was frazzled, overwhelmed and just felt pressured and was recalling some information wrong. She didn't have any pay stubs on her so when they asked how much she makes monthly she recalled incorrectly and actually gave a number higher than what the real number is. 

 

Long story short: She's now got a car that she can't afford the monthly payments on, that the financing was approved on the premise of fake income numbers (not intentionally, she just honestly couldn't remember and they were wanting a number out of her), and she just wants her old car back and to reverse the "Trade in" as if it never happened. It's been less than 24 hours since this has all gone down.

 

I've advised her to just honestly explain the situation to the manager, but she's worried she might just get sales pitched into even more stuff. I told her I'd go with her, so I was hoping to see if there is any "ammunition" I can bring with me. 

 

 

One thought I had: Just call the bank they finance through and tell them that hey, you approved it based on non-factual numbers and there will be no money in the account for you to take. 

You may want to talk to Consumer Protection B.C. before you go back to the dealership.(if it still exists)

 

https://www.consumerprotectionbc.ca/2011/11/can-i-return-a-new-car/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Probably not going to be thrilled to read this but in reality there is little recourse other than going to the dealership, talking to management and hoping they are willing to take the car back.

 

 

https://mvsabc.com/v1/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/VSA-Fact-Sheet_Vehicle-Returns.pdf

 

The only other option would be to contact a news media company and explain what happened to them and see if they are willing to make a story out of it. The thought of bad press might make the dealership willing to take back the car. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

43 minutes ago, NucksPatsFan said:

Hey all, 

 

I have a family member who is in a bit of a pickle and was wondering if anyone here had any experience with this situation:

 

She owned a brand new sedan that she bought (a 2016) that she's been financing for a few years and was just looking at different dealerships to see what there is out there in terms of trading in her car for another one. 

 

She was at a dealership (I won't name names as I don't want to place blame) and got caught in the "sales guy tactics" where she went just to look, and accidentally let it slip there was a specific car she had been eyeing more than others, and he (the sales guy) just stuck to that. The sales guy and the financing girl were asking her a lot of questions about what she can afford, etc. etc. and all her employment history and salary etc. They told her she could have the car she mentioned at X dollars per month financing and they would take in her current car, and started printing out a bunch of forms etc etc.

 

She was frazzled, overwhelmed and just felt pressured and was recalling some information wrong. She didn't have any pay stubs on her so when they asked how much she makes monthly she recalled incorrectly and actually gave a number higher than what the real number is. 

 

Long story short: She's now got a car that she can't afford the monthly payments on, that the financing was approved on the premise of fake income numbers (not intentionally, she just honestly couldn't remember and they were wanting a number out of her), and she just wants her old car back and to reverse the "Trade in" as if it never happened. It's been less than 24 hours since this has all gone down.

 

I've advised her to just honestly explain the situation to the manager, but she's worried she might just get sales pitched into even more stuff. I told her I'd go with her, so I was hoping to see if there is any "ammunition" I can bring with me. 

 

 

One thought I had: Just call the bank they finance through and tell them that hey, you approved it based on non-factual numbers and there will be no money in the account for you to take. 

I feel like there's more to the story than her "honestly remembering it wrong".

 

You either have the money or you don't. You can have one really good month (commission wise) and then have a bad one the next. Or maybe you lose a job or whatever. These would be factors that you'd think about before getting something you can't afford.

 

What kind of car did she get afterward? She could've gotten a cheaper car. (10 k >) just to be on the safe side? It doesn't really make sense.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

37 minutes ago, Jimmy McGill said:

I'm afraid your friend is probably out of luck

 

https://mvsabc.com/consumer-tips/what-you-should-know-about-vehicle-returns/

 

Car dealers are mercenaries. Never, ever go there in a hurry or with a specific car in mind. Never go for the easy monthly long term finance option if at all possible. 

Except this part keeps the door open?:

 

Quote

Dealership errors:  If there is a serious problem with the vehicle that was not disclosed to you, or if the vehicle was sold to you in an improper manner, the return of the vehicle may be one of the remedies that is considered.  If you file a complaint with the VSA, the remedy to your problem will be determined by an investigation of all the circumstances of the sale, not just your preferences.

High pressure and less than transparent sales tactics are generally frowned upon.   Even with a signed contract, I've seen examples of it being ignored because a verbal presentation and understanding of the contract that was rushed through differed from the actual signed piece of paper.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, Dazzle said:

I feel like there's more to the story than her "honestly remembering it wrong".

 

You either have the money or you don't. You can have one really good month (commission wise) and then have a bad one the next. Or maybe you lose a job or whatever. These would be factors that you'd think about before getting something you can't afford.

 

What kind of car did she get afterward? She could've gotten a cheaper car. (10 k >) just to be on the safe side? It doesn't really make sense.

 

Again I'm only getting the 1 side of the story but if you knew her you'd know she'd be the last person to try and "pull something off". 

 

She's been looking into cross overs/larger sedans/or smaller SUV's (like Mitsubishi's). While she's been searching, she's been fully aware that she will pay more than what she currently pays. Where the problem lies here is she was talked into agreeing to a trade in for a vehicle that is going to cost her more than what she knew she could go up to. It was a tactic of "oh you can go just $20 more bi-weekly above your budget who can't afford $20?" and then that "20" turned into 25 and then 30 and 35. And all along there's more and more papers being printed, and the finance person being on the phone with "someone" who is going to make the decision on the approval. She's known all along that she currently pays X per month and that she is going to search for a new vehicle that she can afford up to Y per month. As for not remembering how much she makes, it's not a situation of she said she makes 7k a month when really she makes 4. It's a situation of she thought after deductions she makes 4k but really she makes 3400 (i don't know the exact numbers). 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, debluvscanucks said:

Except this part keeps the door open?:

 

High pressure and less than transparent sales tactics are generally frowned upon.   Even with a signed contract, I've seen examples of it being ignored because a verbal presentation and understanding of the contract that was rushed through differed from the actual signed piece of paper.

really depends on the dealership and its policies. Unfortunately they don't have to take it back. If she also misrepresented her salary... thats a tough one. 

 

Her best option might actually be to contact one of the consumer media people and see if it can become a story. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Jimmy McGill said:

really depends on the dealership and its policies. Unfortunately they don't have to take it back. If she also misrepresented her salary... thats a tough one. 

 

Her best option might actually be to contact one of the consumer media people and see if it can become a story. 

I worked as the front end customer service and claims adjustor for a moving company that had a "contract" that they "urged" people to sign on the fly.  "Have to get your stuff loaded, just sign here" and ask questions later.  (When I learned about their tactics I immediately addressed them and they pretended to care but didn't, so I abruptly quit).

 

Long story short, they ended up in court a few times and one judge threw out their contract and the $11,000.00 owing on it because he said it was bogus.  That they pressured the guy to sign without him fully understanding what it was he was signing and that their verbal discussion was also part of the contract.  I was surprised that it happened that way, but also quite encouraged by it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also I'll add I bought a 60,000 truck and lost my job a month later so, I have been through it. 

 

 

The bottom line is I had to work long hours and adjust my lifestyle to get on top of my new budget but I now drive the vehicle of my dreams and love it :)

 

 

Sounds like a bit of buyers remorse tbh. I mean, how much work is an extra few hundred dollars per month anyways Really?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, debluvscanucks said:

I worked as the front end customer service and claims adjustor for a moving company that had a "contract" that they "urged" people to sign on the fly.  "Have to get your stuff loaded, just sign here" and ask questions later.  (When I learned about their tactics I immediately addressed them and they pretended to care but didn't, so I abruptly quit).

 

Long story short, they ended up in court a few times and one judge threw out their contract and the $11,000.00 owing on it because he said it was bogus.  That they pressured the guy to sign without him fully understanding what it was he was signing and that their verbal discussion was also part of the contract.  I was surprised that it happened that way, but also quite encouraged by it.

thats good to hear. 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a Finance Manager for a large dealership here on VI.  If the bank has incorrect details on her income, she can call the banks customer service line and explain the situation, and the dealership may lose its funding on the deal, which will make her signed contract null and void, but she needs to do this ASAP.

 

As others have suggest though, I would talk to the owner/general manger and discuss.  I would also explain to them that you are prepared to get the Vehicle Sales Authority involved, as that is the governing entity for car dealerships in BC.  If she can prove she was coerced then it shouldn't be an issue, especially if shes formally requested to cancel the deal AND they have misreported her credit info, this all looks poor on the dealership and they probably won't want the fall out.

 

We get a lot of business from Vancouver and lower mainland, and I'm starting to understand why.  Keep your head about you when dealing with them, don't deal with the salesman or the finance manager, go to the top. Good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Jimmy McGill said:

I'm afraid your friend is probably out of luck

 

https://mvsabc.com/consumer-tips/what-you-should-know-about-vehicle-returns/

 

Car dealers are mercenaries. Never, ever go there in a hurry or with a specific car in mind. Never go for the easy monthly long term finance option if at all possible. 

3 years ago I bought a 2014 Mitsubishi Lancer SE used. We went over pricing options and it ended with me saying 'Look, if you give me the car for this price I'll just write you the full cheque right now otherwise I'll go find another dealership that will''. Best decision I've ever made. I don't have to worry about finances and got the car for a few thousand cheaper than his 'bottom line'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think she should simply trade this new car in on a Dodge Challenger Demon.  Then target guys who think they have fast cars to 1/4 mile drag races for pink slips.  She would soon be able to open her own car lot!!!  :shock:  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, Xbox said:

3 years ago I bought a 2014 Mitsubishi Lancer SE used. We went over pricing options and it ended with me saying 'Look, if you give me the car for this price I'll just write you the full cheque right now otherwise I'll go find another dealership that will''. Best decision I've ever made. I don't have to worry about finances and got the car for a few thousand cheaper than his 'bottom line'.

I have begun with the line "whats the cheapest thing on the lot right now". Sets the tone nicely. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

57 minutes ago, Type R said:

I'm a Finance Manager for a large dealership here on VI.  If the bank has incorrect details on her income, she can call the banks customer service line and explain the situation, and the dealership may lose its funding on the deal, which will make her signed contract null and void, but she needs to do this ASAP.

 

As others have suggest though, I would talk to the owner/general manger and discuss.  I would also explain to them that you are prepared to get the Vehicle Sales Authority involved, as that is the governing entity for car dealerships in BC.  If she can prove she was coerced then it shouldn't be an issue, especially if shes formally requested to cancel the deal AND they have misreported her credit info, this all looks poor on the dealership and they probably won't want the fall out.

 

We get a lot of business from Vancouver and lower mainland, and I'm starting to understand why.  Keep your head about you when dealing with them, don't deal with the salesman or the finance manager, go to the top. Good luck.

That's good to know, thank you. 

 

That was my first thought, is there is no way the bank would be happy to learn they approved a loan under the assumption the client was making X amount per month and thus could afford it, but the reality is the client makes 20% less than that and actually can't. 

 

I'm going to go with her tomorrow morning to speak to the sales manager but it's good to know that I can reference "hey we're going to call RBC and let them know they're funding a service that can't be afforded". 

 

 

3 hours ago, Eli4sPetterss0n said:

Also I'll add I bought a 60,000 truck and lost my job a month later so, I have been through it. 

 

 

The bottom line is I had to work long hours and adjust my lifestyle to get on top of my new budget but I now drive the vehicle of my dreams and love it :)

 

 

Sounds like a bit of buyers remorse tbh. I mean, how much work is an extra few hundred dollars per month anyways Really?

 

 

Are you the the sales guy that sold to her?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, NucksPatsFan said:

That's good to know, thank you. 

 

That was my first thought, is there is no way the bank would be happy to learn they approved a loan under the assumption the client was making X amount per month and thus could afford it, but the reality is the client makes 20% less than that and actually can't. 

 

I'm going to go with her tomorrow morning to speak to the sales manager but it's good to know that I can reference "hey we're going to call RBC and let them know they're funding a service that can't be afforded". 

 

 

 

Are you the the sales guy that sold to her?

Obviously.

 

 

HAHAHAHA

 

No, just trying to be nice after I kinda made a nasty comment above. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...