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Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302 crashes shortly after takeoff, 157 people (18 Canadians) dead, no survivors


Odd.

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An Ethiopian Airlines jet has crashed shortly after take-off from Addis Ababa, killing all on board.

The airline said 149 passengers and eight crew members were on flight ET302 from the Ethiopian capital to Nairobi in Kenya.

It said 32 Kenyans, 18 Canadians, eight Americans and seven British nationals were among the passengers.

The crash happened at 08:44 local time, six minutes after the months-old Boeing 737 Max-8 took off.

Do we know how it happened?

The cause of the disaster is not yet clear. However, the pilot had reported difficulties and had asked to return to Addis Ababa, the airline said.

"At this stage, we cannot rule out anything," Ethiopian Airlines CEO Tewolde Gebremariam told reporters at Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa.

"We cannot also attribute the cause to anything because we will have to comply with the international regulation to wait for the investigation."

The Boeing 737 Max-8 aircraft that crashed on SundayImage copyrightJONATHAN DRUION Image captionThe Boeing 737 Max-8 aircraft that crashed on Sunday

Visibility was said to be good but air traffic monitor Flightradar24 reported that the plane's "vertical speed was unstable after take-off".

An eyewitness at the scene told the BBC there was an intense fire as the aircraft hit the ground.

"The blast and the fire were so strong that we couldn't get near it," he said. "Everything is burnt down."

First word of the crash came when Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed expressed his "deepest condolences" on Twitter.

Recovery operations were under way near the crash site around the town of Bishoftu, which is 60km (37 miles) south-east of the capital.

The plane was delivered to Ethiopian Airlines on 15 November last year, records show.

Map showing the flight path

Who are the victims?

Mr Gebremariam told the news conference that passengers from more than 30 countries were on board the flight.

He said they included 32 Kenyans, 18 Canadians, nine Ethiopians, eight Italians, eight Chinese, eight Americans, seven Britons, seven French citizens, six Egyptians, five Dutch citizens, four Indians and four people from Slovakia.

Slovak MP Anton Hrnko later confirmed via Facebook that his wife and two children were on the plane.

Three Austrians, three Swedes, three Russians, two Moroccans, two Spaniards, two Poles and two Israelis were also on the flight.

Ethiopian Airlines shared this image and said it showed CEO Tewolde Gebremariam at the crash siteImage copyrightETHIOPIAN AIRLINES Image captionEthiopian Airlines shared this image of CEO Tewolde Gebremariam at the crash site

There was also one passenger each from Belgium, Indonesia, Somalia, Norway, Serbia, Togo, Mozambique, Rwanda, Sudan, Uganda and Yemen.

Four people held United Nations passports, the airline said, and it believed some passengers could have been heading to a session of the UN Environment Assembly which begins in Nairobi on Monday.

The pilot was named as Senior Captain Yared Getachew who had a "commendable performance" with more than 8,000 hours in the air, the airline said.

The plane's First Officer Ahmed Nur Mohammod Nur had 200 flight hours, it added.

What reaction has there been?

Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said the government was "in close contact with Ethiopian authorities".

Presentational white space

The British ambassador to Ethiopia, Alastair McPhail, said consular staff were "working hard to establish the details".

French President Emmanuel Macron expressed solidarity with the people of Ethiopia and Kenya, tweeting: "We share their sorrow."

African Union Commission chairman Moussa Faki Mahamat expressed "utter shock and immense sadness" while Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta said he was "saddened".

Mahboub Maalim, executive secretary of the East African bloc Igad, said the region was in mourning.

"I cannot seem to find words comforting enough to the families and friends of those who might have lost their lives in this tragedy," he said in a statement.

What do we know about the plane?

The 737 Max-8 aircraft is relatively new to the skies, having been launched in 2016. It was added to the Ethiopian Airlines fleet in July last year.

Boeing said it was "deeply saddened" by the crash and offered to send a team to provide technical assistance.

Another plane of the same model was involved in a crash five months ago, when a Lion Air flight crashed into the sea near Indonesia with nearly 190 people on board.

The airline's highest fatalities prior to this came in a November 1996 crash during a hijacking on a flight from Addis Ababa to Nairobi.

One of the plane's engines stopped when the fuel ran out and although pilots attempted an emergency water landing, they hit a coral reef in the Indian Ocean and 123 of the 175 people on board were killed.

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-47514289

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-47513508

 

I'm pretty sure after this tragedy, the Boeing 737 Max-8 will be permanently disbanded. This plane model has caused 346 deaths in the last 5 months. This model is deadlier than the Concorde. 

 

The Boeing 737 Max-8 has only been in commercial use since 2017.

In October last year a Lion Air Boeing 737 Max went down shortly after take-off from Jakarta, Indonesia, killing all 189 people on board.

That aircraft was less than three months old.

Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302 also went down just minutes after take-off. The aircraft - registration ET-AVJ - first flew in October 2018, according to flight tracking websites.

 

 

Truly sad news to wake up to this morning. Condolences goes out to everyone affected.

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To my understanding this is the second or third fatal crash involving this model of plane with numerous others being grounded due to similar issues.

 

Boeing is in some trouble on this one.  Maybe Canada should put Boeing in a list for national safety :bigblush:

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1 minute ago, Warhippy said:

To my understanding this is the second or third fatal crash involving this model of plane with numerous others being grounded due to similar issues.

 

Boeing is in some trouble on this one.  Maybe Canada should put Boeing in a list for national safety :bigblush:

There's going to be some major lawsuits coming for sure. 

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2 minutes ago, Odd. said:

I'm pretty sure after this tragedy, the Boeing 737 Max-8 will be permanently disbanded. This plane model has caused 346 deaths in the last 5 months. This model is deadlier than the Concorde. 

 

The Boeing 737 Max-8 has only been in commercial use since 2017.

In October last year a Lion Air Boeing 737 Max went down shortly after take-off from Jakarta, Indonesia, killing all 189 people on board.

That aircraft was less than three months old.

Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302 also went down just minutes after take-off. The aircraft - registration ET-AVJ - first flew in October 2018, according to flight tracking websites.

 

 

Truly sad news to wake up to this morning. Condolences goes out to everyone affected.

I was pretty unaware that this particular plane model has been recently involved in fatalities. The article curiously does not mention about recent incidents/crises about or involving this plane model.

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It certainly doesn't look good for Boeing, (at least this particular model) but it's possible that it's a coincidence. I'll wait until we hear an official reason.

 

That being said, I'd like to hear what @aeromotacanucks ha to say. Maybe he knows something about this jet.

 

Edit: I'm reading that the earlier crash was the result of a faulty safety feature. It's supposed to automatically pull the nose down, if it detects the angle to be too steep. The pilots basically became engaged in a tug of war with the automated system, which was reacting to incorrect information.

 

If it's found that this plane experienced the same problem, there could be huge repercussions for Boeing.

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4 minutes ago, Monty said:

Have two colleague’s who take this flight consistently. One was not on it, the other was. Devastating.

I was surprised to see so many Canadians on this flight. What is happening in that area of the world that draws so many Canadians? Or was it just a fluke?

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10 minutes ago, Monty said:

Have two colleague’s who take this flight consistently. One was not on it, the other was. Devastating.

Condolences, Monty. 

 

3 minutes ago, RUPERTKBD said:

I was surprised to see so many Canadians on this flight. What is happening in that area of the world that draws so many Canadians? Or was it just a fluke?

There's an UN Environment assembly in Nairobi that takes place tomorrow thru Friday. I can only imagine many of those on board were there to attend. There were at least 4 UN's on board that flight with many others most likely visitors and attendees.

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  • Odd. changed the title to Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302 crashes shortly after takeoff, 157 people (18 Canadians) dead, no survivors
3 hours ago, Warhippy said:

To my understanding this is the second or third fatal crash involving this model of plane with numerous others being grounded due to similar issues.

 

Boeing is in some trouble on this one.  Maybe Canada should put Boeing in a list for national safety :bigblush:

Quote

Emergency AD Addresses Faulty Sensors in Boeing 737 Max

 - November 7, 2018, 4:22 PM
 
 

737

Angle-of-attack sensor faults in the Boeing 737 Max could lead to nose-down trim commands, loss of control, and, ultimately, a crash, according to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (Photo: Boeing)
 

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration issued an emergency airworthiness directive Wednesday giving pilots of Boeing 737 Max 8s and Max 9s procedures to follow in the event of runaway horizontal trim caused by faulty angle-of-attack inputs to the airplane’s flight control system. The AD comes a day after Boeing issued an operations manual bulletin in response to investigators’ findings that the Lion Air 737 Max 8 that crashed into the Java Sea on October 29 experienced erroneous input from one of the sensors.
 

According to the AD, analysis performed by Boeing showed the defect could lead to repeated nose-down trim commands of the horizontal stabilizer, thereby compromising aircraft controllability and leading to excessive nose-down attitude, “significant” altitude loss, and, ultimately, a crash.

The directive requires a revision to the chapters in the airplane flight manual dedicated to certificate limitations and operating procedures for addressing runaway stabilizer.
 

The AD comes nine days into the crash investigation and about a week after search crews found the stricken airplane’s flight data recorder in the wreckage at the bottom of the Java Sea. Readouts from the FDR showed that the Boeing 737 Max 8 experienced faulty airspeed readings during its last four flights, but investigators until Tuesday had yet to determine any connection between the instrument anomalies and the October 29 crash that killed all 189 onboard.
 

Search-and-rescue teams have yet to recover the airplane’s cockpit voice recorder (CVR), believed embedded in the muddy seabed, northeast of Jakarta, where the 737 Max 8 crashed 13 minutes into its flight. On November 5, navy divers recovered the emergency locator transmitter from a depth of 98 feet. Searchers have also retrieved parts of the airplane’s landing gear and fuselage from the Java Sea.

Boeing should be held responsible and issue a recall to all affected aircraft, and ensure the faulty sensor is replaced in all in service aircraft at the company's cost. In addition this also lands on the shoulders of the regulatory equivalent of Transport Canada (the board that oversees maintenance requirements of aircraft among other things). If the advisory had been adhered to, that plane should have been grounded if there was any question as to its airworthiness. More over, it's on the shoulders of the airline company that didn't want to incur loss of revenues by taking a plane out of service without having a suitable replacement.

Flights domestically in Canada and the US are for the most part pretty safe over large sample sets, but I still keep flying to a minimum and will opt to drive whenever I make long trips. The only time I have made a habit of flying is when I am personally in control of an aircraft (used to fly Cessna 172 and 152 models), have the ability to physically inspect the aircraft before departure and have an opportunity to inspect the maintenance log to ensure all required overhauls and maintenance is performed according to official schedules laid out by Transport Canada.

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28 minutes ago, VanGnome said:

The only time I have made a habit of flying is when I am personally in control of an aircraft (used to fly Cessna 172 and 152 models), have the ability to physically inspect the aircraft before departure and have an opportunity to inspect the maintenance log to ensure all required overhauls and maintenance is performed according to official schedules laid out by Transport Canada.

As sad as this crash is, and strange that that this particular new type of plane is having big issues, flying remains so much safer than driving. VanGnome, it sounds like you may have some control issues. 

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28 minutes ago, Slegr said:

As sad as this crash is, and strange that that this particular new type of plane is having big issues, flying remains so much safer than driving. VanGnome, it sounds like you may have some control issues. 

I hate being a passenger in cars more than flying.  Those single engine planes are the more dangerous ways of flying I believe.  

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50 minutes ago, Slegr said:

As sad as this crash is, and strange that that this particular new type of plane is having big issues, flying remains so much safer than driving. VanGnome, it sounds like you may have some control issues. 

I already prefaced my comments by stating that Domestic flights are by and large safe, across many tens of thousands of flights. I also said the only time I have made a HABIT of flying, is by doing so recreationally. A lot more than just the safety of something is taken into account for me when deciding mode of transport. I genuinely enjoy taking a few days to travel by vehicle, stoping at notable sights and visiting placed I would ordinarily not visit. For me traveling is more about the experience than the act, since I don't travel for business I'm fine with spending the time not flying.

Traveling for business pretty much always means having to fly just due to the sheer efficiency of it. Control issues? Maybe, I prefer to look at it as being overly responsible for my own life. I prefer to put my individual well being in the hands of others as little as possible.

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IMO this a risk of flying on what I deem to be crappy airlines... look at all the major airplane crashes from the last decade or so and it always seems to be of airlines of limited reputation or value. I usually avoid country branded airlines except for air Canada etc..

 

Personally speaking I only fly on major airlines because saving a few bucks isn’t worth it. 

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3 hours ago, VanGnome said:

Boeing should be held responsible and issue a recall to all affected aircraft, and ensure the faulty sensor is replaced in all in service aircraft at the company's cost. In addition this also lands on the shoulders of the regulatory equivalent of Transport Canada (the board that oversees maintenance requirements of aircraft among other things). If the advisory had been adhered to, that plane should have been grounded if there was any question as to its airworthiness. More over, it's on the shoulders of the airline company that didn't want to incur loss of revenues by taking a plane out of service without having a suitable replacement.

Flights domestically in Canada and the US are for the most part pretty safe over large sample sets, but I still keep flying to a minimum and will opt to drive whenever I make long trips. The only time I have made a habit of flying is when I am personally in control of an aircraft (used to fly Cessna 172 and 152 models), have the ability to physically inspect the aircraft before departure and have an opportunity to inspect the maintenance log to ensure all required overhauls and maintenance is performed according to official schedules laid out by Transport Canada.

So second, but with numerous potential issues of this type in the lineup.

 

That's going to be a serious issue for Boeing for sure.  

 

Good find man thanks

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