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Quebec woman faked being a nurse for 20 years


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7 minutes ago, Hamhuis Hip Check said:

I wonder if she could pass all the requirements to become a nurse with that much on the job training

If there's a practical part of a nursing exam, she'd likely ace it.  It's the written part that might trip her up.  Sounds like she worked in a few specializations over the years but a board exam would have a little bit of everything.

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Probably better at her job than a lot of people that come out of medical school considering it took 20 years to catch on and no incidents.

 

Just goes to show you don't need schooling in a profession to be successful. Obviously, with nursing you'd want them to probably have one in fear of your life but some people are just good at what they do.

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3 hours ago, Hamhuis Hip Check said:

I wonder if she could pass all the requirements to become a nurse with that much on the job training

i mean if she does just as good of a job as the rest, i say leave it be, but still pretty crazy after 20 years, no way some one could get away with that now a days, without documents and stuff, unless it was forged.

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33 minutes ago, sonoman said:

Please explain.  

>see doctor for pain in leg/lower back that had been present for 9ish months and was getting worse

>2 minute appointment, gives me some tylenol

>later find out it's bursitis

 

>notice my cognition is changing drastically, losing functional abilities, getting paranoid, start posturing, having ideas of reference that eventually progressed into delusions, etc

>ask psychs to pls help me

>shrinks aren't worried

>family doctor realizes they're a bunch of morons but doesn't/can't do anything

>go through months of psychological and emotional turmoil

>spend 3 weeks in the psych ward after crisis incident

>diagnosed with psychosis

 

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48 minutes ago, 112 said:

>see doctor for pain in leg/lower back that had been present for 9ish months and was getting worse

>2 minute appointment, gives me some tylenol

>later find out it's bursitis

 

>notice my cognition is changing drastically, losing functional abilities, getting paranoid, start posturing, having ideas of reference that eventually progressed into delusions, etc

>ask psychs to pls help me

>shrinks aren't worried

>family doctor realizes they're a bunch of morons but doesn't/can't do anything

>go through months of psychological and emotional turmoil

>spend 3 weeks in the psych ward after crisis incident

>diagnosed with psychosis

 

Me too...seems it's a thing:

 

- Nearly died a week after childbirth because the specialist who delivered my son did not deliver the placenta - was in a hurry.

- Mom was repeatedly sent home over a matter of a couple of years after suffering repeated seizures - was told she was allergic to MSG (no testing was done).  Was actually brain cancer and it was "too late" by the time they diagnosed it correctly (after I insisted they keep her for further testing)

- When we were seeing the oncologist for the first time, I was in the room with Mom as he spoke directly to me (like she wasn't there).  Asked what we "wanted to do with her?".  Then when I asked to clarify he said, "well she's gonna die...do you want her at home with you or in care?".  She immediately started to cry.  Not a good way to learn you're going to die.

- Dad had a hernia repaired - mesh failed and he's been prone to infection ever since...partly because the "drain" they'd inserted fell out (onto the hospital floor) and the doctor came in, gave him hell for it being out and jammed it back in him!  No sterilization/changing it.  

- When my child was born the nurse came in to remove him from his bassinet and banged his head on the corner of the little hospital TV!

 

There's more, but it makes me tired to relive it.

 

I'd try a fake nurse (maybe even doctor) at this point.   If she's dedicated enough to hang in there and do it right, test and qualify her.

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One of the things I've noticed in hospitals is that you never see healthcare aids ( i.e. Orderlies). I know in the US they've gotten rid of them, I wondering if that's a trend here too. 

It's too bad to be honest, they'd help alleviate some of the workload on the nurses. Provide a bit of muscle in case patients get out of line. Even if it's just assisting patients moving from ward to ward. Maybe if the fake nurse wasn't certified, they could keep them, and work as a healthcare aid until they passed their exams. 

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41 minutes ago, debluvscanucks said:

Me too...seems it's a thing:

 

- Nearly died a week after childbirth because the specialist who delivered my son did not deliver the placenta - was in a hurry.

- Mom was repeatedly sent home over a matter of a couple of years after suffering repeated seizures - was told she was allergic to MSG (no testing was done).  Was actually brain cancer and it was "too late" by the time they diagnosed it correctly (after I insisted they keep her for further testing)

- When we were seeing the oncologist for the first time, I was in the room with Mom as he spoke directly to me (like she wasn't there).  Asked what we "wanted to do with her?".  Then when I asked to clarify he said, "well she's gonna die...do you want her at home with you or in care?".  She immediately started to cry.  Not a good way to learn you're going to die.

- Dad had a hernia repaired - mesh failed and he's been prone to infection ever since...partly because the "drain" they'd inserted fell out (onto the hospital floor) and the doctor came in, gave him hell for it being out and jammed it back in him!  No sterilization/changing it.  

- When my child was born the nurse came in to remove him from his bassinet and banged his head on the corner of the little hospital TV!

 

There's more, but it makes me tired to relive it.

 

I'd try a fake nurse (maybe even doctor) at this point.   If she's dedicated enough to hang in there and do it right, test and qualify her.

Same thing with my dad. For him it has been multiple ICU trips, repair surgery and a lot of ongoing issues. There's a class action suit going on related to the hernia mesh products -  if you want to check it out (this is the firm I have my dads case with): https://www.siskinds.com/class-action/physiomesh-hernia-mesh/ 

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35 minutes ago, Ghostsof1915 said:

One of the things I've noticed in hospitals is that you never see healthcare aids ( i.e. Orderlies). I know in the US they've gotten rid of them, I wondering if that's a trend here too. 

It's too bad to be honest, they'd help alleviate some of the workload on the nurses. Provide a bit of muscle in case patients get out of line. Even if it's just assisting patients moving from ward to ward. Maybe if the fake nurse wasn't certified, they could keep them, and work as a healthcare aid until they passed their exams. 

Even the purportedly trained security guards overstep into criminal actions when physically handling patients.

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Just now, 112 said:

Even the purportedly trained security guards overstep into criminal actions when physically handling patients.

Well considering when I was in Emergency. I was on a gurney parked in a hallway until I could see the specialist. Behind me a patient and his brother in law got into a dustup. 

I was in no condition to try and break it up. VGH paged security. A nurse was there in a minute tried to break it up. By the time the security guy got in it was 10 minutes too late. 

He shrugged, and walked off. Pretty sure you provide some use of force to health care assistants, it might make things easier on the nurses. And they can do the job they are trained for. 

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14 minutes ago, Ghostsof1915 said:

Well considering when I was in Emergency. I was on a gurney parked in a hallway until I could see the specialist. Behind me a patient and his brother in law got into a dustup. 

I was in no condition to try and break it up. VGH paged security. A nurse was there in a minute tried to break it up. By the time the security guy got in it was 10 minutes too late. 

He shrugged, and walked off. Pretty sure you provide some use of force to health care assistants, it might make things easier on the nurses. And they can do the job they are trained for. 

The security in our hospitals assault patients and worse.

 

They need brain, but the healthcare authorities hire on brawn.

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