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Goodbye Hong Kong. Nice knowing you....


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Now that the UK has stated that they view the ccp as not complying with the Joint Declaration, they should follow it up by trying to convince the rest of the G7 (and as many UN member states as possible) to nullify the "One China" policy.

 

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China non-compliant with Joint Declaration, says UK

2021-03-13 HKT 22:54
Britain's Foreign Affairs Secretary Dominic Raab looks on as he walks outside Downing Street in London. Photo: Reuters
  • Britain's Foreign Affairs Secretary Dominic Raab looks on as he walks outside Downing Street in London. Photo: Reuters
 
China is no longer compliant with Hong Kong's joint declaration after Beijing announced sweeping changes to the region's electoral system, Britain said Saturday.

"The UK now considers Beijing to be in a state of ongoing non-compliance with the Sino-British Joint Declaration," the foreign ministry said in a statement.

The treaty was signed before Britain handed Hong Kong back to China in 1997 and was designed to allay fears about its future under Beijing's rule.

It guarantees the financial hub special status including a high degree of autonomy to manage its own affairs and the right to freedom of speech.

But British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said that Beijing's decision "to impose radical changes to restrict participation in Hong Kong's electoral system" was a "further clear breach" of the agreement.

"This is part of a pattern designed to harass and stifle all voices critical of China's policies and is the third breach of the Joint Declaration in less than nine months," he said.

"I must now report that the UK considers Beijing to be in a state of ongoing non-compliance with the Joint Declaration," he added, further ramping up tensions between the two nations.

Britain has been a strong critic of China's crackdown on pro-democracy campaigners in Hong Kong, and angered Beijing by announcing a new visa scheme offering millions of its residents a pathway to British citizenship. (AFP)

 

 

https://news.rthk.hk/rthk/en/component/k2/1580434-20210313.htm

 

BTW, looks like it won't be long before I won't be quoting RTHK articles any more.  The new lackey installed as their Chief has decided to wade in on editorial independence of programming (he's been cutting episodes of material that were ready to go but were deemed "indecent" or because he apparently didn't like the narrative), so it's only a matter of time before he starts shifting the spin on the RTHK news websites in favour of the government and the ccp.


For a public broadcaster, they were fair in their provision of news and fearless in their willingness to expose truth to power.  Unfortunately, as a government-funded institution and under attack by pro-establishment politicians and talking heads consistently and constantly for the longest time, they may finally have been dealt an incapacitating blow and are eventually likely to end up a government mouthpiece, just like the ccp mouthpieces cctv and xinhua to their north.

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1 hour ago, 6of1_halfdozenofother said:

Now that the UK has stated that they view the ccp as not complying with the Joint Declaration, they should follow it up by trying to convince the rest of the G7 (and as many UN member states as possible) to nullify the "One China" policy.

 

  Reveal hidden contents

 

 

https://news.rthk.hk/rthk/en/component/k2/1580434-20210313.htm

 

BTW, looks like it won't be long before I won't be quoting RTHK articles any more.  The new lackey installed as their Chief has decided to wade in on editorial independence of programming (he's been cutting episodes of material that were ready to go but were deemed "indecent" or because he apparently didn't like the narrative), so it's only a matter of time before he starts shifting the spin on the RTHK news websites in favour of the government and the ccp.


For a public broadcaster, they were fair in their provision of news and fearless in their willingness to expose truth to power.  Unfortunately, as a government-funded institution and under attack by pro-establishment politicians and talking heads consistently and constantly for the longest time, they may finally have been dealt an incapacitating blow and are eventually likely to end up a government mouthpiece, just like the ccp mouthpieces cctv and xinhua to their north.

And this is a problem when Trudeau cozies up to them too much, he'll keep his mouth shut if the chips are ever down and we'll look like fools.

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3 hours ago, Nucksownyou said:

It's amazing how many people turn a blind eye to China. What they are doing would be enough to start a world war if this was Nazi Germany.

Have you enlisted yet, you know, to fight in the upcoming war?

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4 hours ago, Nucksownyou said:

It's amazing how many people turn a blind eye to China. What they are doing would be enough to start a world war if this was Nazi Germany.

When they decide to conquer their neighbors it very well might. No govt gave a $&!# about the treatment of Jewish/Slavic or other 'undesirable' people in the lead up to WW2. The annexation of neighboring countries though...

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1 hour ago, Gnarcore said:

When they decide to conquer their neighbors it very well might. No govt gave a $&!# about the treatment of Jewish/Slavic or other 'undesirable' people in the lead up to WW2. The annexation of neighboring countries though...

Question is: what would be considered as "annexation"?  They've always viewed Taiwan as their own internal matter, which is why any pretense of accepting the "one china" policy needs to go before the west can take the moral high ground of "protecting democracy in Taiwan".

 

Besides, the way they've been loan sharking countries, they might not need to militarily "conquer" them, just point out the fact that most of the newly-built infrastucture in those countries belongs to them, or strip them bare of natural resources via the companies that have infiltrated those countries' key indusries.

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42 minutes ago, 6of1_halfdozenofother said:

Question is: what would be considered as "annexation"?  They've always viewed Taiwan as their own internal matter, which is why any pretense of accepting the "one china" policy needs to go before the west can take the moral high ground of "protecting democracy in Taiwan".

 

Besides, the way they've been loan sharking countries, they might not need to militarily "conquer" them, just point out the fact that most of the newly-built infrastucture in those countries belongs to them, or strip them bare of natural resources via the companies that have infiltrated those countries' key indusries.

And when they do annex Taiwan, physically, there will be action. I fully believe China needs to be dealt with; I just wouldn't compare it to how Nazi Germany was responded to. 

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1 minute ago, Gnarcore said:

And when they do annex Taiwan, physically, there will be action. I fully believe China needs to be dealt with; I just wouldn't compare it to how Nazi Germany was responded to. 

But then you have the issue of interfering with another country's "internal matters", which has always been frowned upon on the international scene.  If the west accepts "one china" as the official foreign policy, then annexing Taiwan becomes an internal matter (difference in scale, but no difference in nature than the Oka Crisis, or the October Crisis).  We'd have to make it clear - before the ccp moves on Taiwan - that "one china" is not practiceable and not the de jure policy being accepted.

 

By the way, I like your choice of words.  "Action" is very broad.  You could say the west has been "taking action" all along, from anywhere such as the hot air spewed in government halls of supporting democratically elected governments, to things such as our neighbours south of the 49th selling arms to Taiwan.  Are any of these actions meaningful or sufficiently deterring the ccp from achieving their own "manifest destiny"?  I hardly think so.  I also don't think that the west has much appetite for military conflict - there's not much of their skin in the game, so to speak, to sacrifice their "good men and women" to engage inconflict in terms of ensuring a free Taiwan; they certainly didn't do much for HK, despite their view of it as a key port of transit for their trade and a jusridiction through which legal agreements would be judged.  As long as the big fat slab of pork called "1.4 billion people's buying power" is dangled in their face, I think the west would prefer to ensure the $$bucks$$ keep rollin' in and settle with less biting and more barking when it comes to human rights and supporting free and open governance models.

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  • 3 weeks later...
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Hong Kong to block public access to private company information

Sweeping changes, which will see the government restrict access to information in city's Companies' Registry, have been slammed by transparency campaigners who say they "will facilitate corruption, fraud and other crimes".
Candice Chauby CANDICE CHAU13:34, 30 MARCH 2021
Print

Public access to currently openly available private information of company directors listed in Hong Kong’s Companies’ Registry are to be restricted, the city’s government has announced.

Companies already listed in the registry will be allowed to block public access to the residential addresses of directors and company secretaries and their full identification numbers, while newly registered firms will be able to withhold the information from day one of being listed in the registry.

The Companies Registry The Companies Registry. File photo: gov.hk.

Officials from the Financial Services and the Treasury Bureau have described the move as an attempt to strike a balance between transparency and the protection of privacy.

 

However, activist investor David Webb, who runs a free database of publicly available information of companies in Hong Kong and the United Kingdom, questioned the government’s decision, and said that the proposed changes. “will facilitate corruption, fraud and other crimes.”

“I don’t think the public needs to know where a director sleeps at night – that is a matter of personal security,” Webb told HKFP. “But they do need to know exactly who the director is, and only a full, unique ID number can achieve that.”

David Webb David Webb. Photo: David Webb.

“The ID is not a password, it is an identifier, a better version of your non-unique name. Sunshine is the best disinfectant. Allowing directors to obscure their identities reduces the ability of researchers and journalists to shine a light in shady places,” Webb added.

 

According to documents submitted by the bureau to the Legislative Council (LegCo), the new arrangements will be enforced in three phases:

  • Phase 1: Companies will no longer have to show the usual residential addresses of directors and their full identification numbers to the public.
  • Phase 2: Private information contained in all documents filed for registration from October next year will be protected from public inspection.
  • Phase 3: From December 2023, companies can apply to have private information in all documents filed before the commencement of phase 2 to be shielded from the public.
Carrie Lam Chief Executive Carrie Lam in a press briefing ahead of the Executive Council meeting on March 30, 2021. Photo: Selina Cheng/HKFP.

The proposed amendments will go through the negative vetting procedure in the legislature, meaning that the legislation will come into effect and continue to operate from the day it is Gazetted unless the LegCo passes a resolution to amend it.

 

In 2013, the government ditched plans to tighten public access to information on the Company Registry as they rewrote the Companies Ordinance after objection from the media, shareholders, and the private sector.

 

Lam: Journalists have no ‘prerogative’

Ahead of a meeting of the Executive Council on Tuesday, Chief Executive Carrie Lam said that the amendments are designed to protect personal privacy, and that she did not see the need to include journalists in the list of individuals allowed to obtain company records.

 

“I can’t see why reporters have to have a prerogative,” said Lam. “Journalists requesting to see what others can’t, it’s a prerogative. In Hong Kong, no one has a prerogative.”

 

The Hong Kong Journalists Association (HKJA) slammed the government’s decision in a Facebook post on Monday, and said that the decision is another blow to Hong Kong’s press freedom.

 

“Press freedom is a human right protected under the Basic Law, the HKJA urged the government to immediately stop implementing the clause, and [HKJA] will study and follow up on the impact of the relevant legislation,” the post read.

 

“HKJA also urged the government to swiftly implement archival and freedom of information legislations, to protect the public’s right to know.”

Gordon Jones, Hong Kong’s registrar of companies from 1993 to 2007, told Bloomberg that he hoped the proposal would be repealed.

 

“In the 14 years in which I was the Registrar of Companies, I never received any complaints about these provisions or suggestions that they infringed directors’ privacy,” Jones told Bloomberg. “I would hope, however, that these misconceived and bad legislative proposals are not only deferred but also repealed.”

 

https://hongkongfp.com/2021/03/30/hong-kong-blocks-public-access-to-private-company-information/

 

How much do you want to bet that there's going to be an influx of illicit and laundered funds - as well as ccp-absconded funds that can't be disclosed to the public - from up north, setting up "companies" in HK?

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  • 3 weeks later...

I think it was the "World Events Thread" that I mentioned that I wouldn't be self-identifying as HKer in the upcoming census, but in light of the movement referred to in the article below, and the fact that I do have some (albeit tenuous) link maternally (and even more tenuous link paternally) to HK, I may go ahead and identify as a HKer.

 

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Declare yourself a Hongkonger, not simply Chinese, Canadian census campaign urges

 

  • The ‘I Am Hong Konger’ campaign aims to boost recognition of an identity that organisers say is under threat of erasure
  • They also want members of the Hong Kong diaspora to specify on the census whether they speak Cantonese
Topic |  Hong Kong
 
Ian Young
 
Ian Young in Vancouver

Published: 2:02am, 16 Apr, 2021

 
A crowd watches Cera Rivers apply icing to the last of 512 cupcakes that make up a Canadian flag during Canada Day celebrations on July 1, 2017 in Richmond, British Columbia. Richmond is the most ethnically Chinese city in the world outside Asia, and home to large numbers of Hong Kong and mainland Chinese immigrants. Photo: AFP
A crowd watches Cera Rivers apply icing to the last of 512 cupcakes that make up a Canadian flag during Canada Day celebrations on July 1, 2017 in Richmond, British Columbia. Richmond is the most ethnically Chinese city in the world outside Asia, and home to large numbers of Hong Kong and mainland Chinese immigrants. Photo: AFP

 

People of Hong Kong origin in Canada have been urged to declare themselves as Hongkongers, and not only Chinese, on the national census next month, in an effort by activists to preserve the diaspora’s “unique identity”.

 

The “I Am Hong Konger” campaign, launched this week, asks immigrants and their descendants to specify their Hong Kong origins in the sections of the census questionnaire about ethnicity and place of birth. The campaigners remind respondents that they can list multiple origins, such as Chinese or Taiwanese.

 

They are also urged to specify whether they speak Cantonese.

 

Campaigner Crispin Chow said in a press release that he felt as if the Hong Kong identity was “under threat and being erased”.

 

 

“Hongkongers have a different culture, we have a different language. We want to show that we exist,” he said. 

There were 215,750 Hong Kong-born people in Canada at the time of the last census in 2016. That was an increase for the first time since 1996, and a reverse of the flow that has resulted in 300,000 Canadian citizens living in Hong Kong.

 

However, no official figures track the number of people of Hong Kong descent. 

 

The long form of the 2021 census lists 11 ethnicities, including Chinese – but not Hongkonger – from which respondents can choose, as well as “other group”, which respondents can specify. 

 

Hong Kong-born Heiky Kwan, who lives in Vancouver, said she would be “checking myself off as a Hongkonger and as an Asian if there’s that field, but am still struggling to see if I will check the box and identify as a Chinese.”

 

Kwan, who was six when she moved to Canada with her family in 1996, said she didn’t “100 per cent identify myself as Chinese”.

 

“A lot of the things that are being marketed to me as being ‘Chinese’ – I don’t really identify with the lived experience of being a Chinese person,” she said. “I don’t want to see Cantonese or the Hong Kong culture just fade away.

 

“It worries me. If we don’t preserve it, in a few generations, will any of us be able to read traditional characters, will no one know how to speak Cantonese?”

 

The campaigners say they want the Canadian government to recognise “Hongkonger” as an “official identity”.

 

“Without reliable statistics and disaggregated data, service providers, policymakers and community organisations are unable to serve the needs of this unique population,” they said in an email.

 

Vancouver police separate supporters and opponents of the Hong Kong protest movement at duelling rallies on August 17, 2019. Photo: AFP
Vancouver police separate supporters and opponents of the Hong Kong protest movement at duelling rallies on August 17, 2019. Photo: AFP

 

The campaign’s website also says it seeks to increase civic participation by Hong Kong Canadians, and strengthen their identity and a sense of unity.

 

Professor Leo Shin, who started the Hong Kong Studies Initiative (HKSI) at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver in 2017, said the sentiments of Hongkongers in Canada towards their identity were “an extension of what is happening in Hong Kong”.

 

“When people feel that an important part of their identities is being erased, it is only natural for them to seek to protect it,” he said.

 

The HKSI project, which promotes teaching and research about Hong Kong, has received an “overwhelmingly positive response”, said Shin, showing a desire to better understand the city “both as a historically constituted space and as a collective experience”.

 

On the other hand, some people believed it was “neither reasonable nor wise to place one’s identification with Hong Kong ahead of that with China”, he said.

 

But “people are complicated beings”, Shin added. “They have multiple identities, and such identities are almost always situational.”

 

“While there are those among the diaspora who seem to take a binary approach to the question of identity, the fact of the matter is that multiple identities could and do coexist,” Shin said. “In other words, one could be both a Chinese and a Hongkonger.”

 

Professor Leo Shin is convenor of the Hong Kong Studies Initiative at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. Photo: UBC
Professor Leo Shin is convenor of the Hong Kong Studies Initiative at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. Photo: UBC

 

The 2019 Hong Kong protest movement spilled over to Canada, with supporters and opponents of the movement clashing in Vancouver and Toronto.

Canadian census day is May 11, when respondents must reflect the status of their household, although the online questionnaire can be filled in from May 3. The process will mostly be conducted online and by phone, reducing face-to-face interaction with census takers as a pandemic precaution.

 

A quarter of all Canadian households will be selected to complete the long-form questionnaire, with the rest receiving a shorter form.

 

The results are used to inform a range of policies and the provision of services ranging from roads, schools and hospitals to language services.

 

It is “is a cornerstone and an essential tool for understanding how Canada is changing over time”, said Anil Arora, Canada’s chief statistician.

 

Canada’s population was 35,151,728 in 2016, according to the last census.

 

 

https://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy/article/3129745/declare-yourself-hong-konger-not-simply-chinese-canadian

 

My cultural background (including my upbringing), my mother tongue, my exposure to Hong Kong and its world view (as well as its historical place in the world) - all of these far exceed my "identity" link to the current mainland "cultural norms" and their attitude towards their place in the world (and I definitely do not share their politics or choice of governance).  Sure, I share a common history to the mainlanders that perhaps stretches back thousands of years, but so do many Asians that have self-identified as other nationalities.

Edited by 6of1_halfdozenofother
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44 minutes ago, nuckin_futz said:

Canadian court to adjourn Huawei's Meng Wanzhou extradition hearing to August

Wed 21 Apr 2021 20:36:10 GMT

 

The adjournment was requested by lawyers for Huawei's Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou

They asked for more time in order to examine newly released documents from HSBC.
 
The arrest and holding of Meng in Canada is a major source of tension with China. And its set to drag on longer now. 
 
The adjournment was requested by lawyers for Huawei's Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou
 
*********************
 
Enough of this crap already. Pick her up and toss her on the other side of the border and tell her "Good Luck".
 
This has caused us way more trouble than it was ever worth.

Emotionally, I would agree with you, except Canada is (and historically has been) a country of due process.  This is where we differ from those ccp jokers on the other side of the puddle, who do things arbitrarily and with imperial whimsicality.  If we were to abandon due process now, then the whole situation would end up a very unnecessary and indecently positioned stain on our trousers, and our word would no longer mean anything on the world stage.

Edited by 6of1_halfdozenofother
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Some of you may remember the July 21, 2019 attack of innocent West Rail passengers by a group of white-shirted thugs and gangsters.  A documentary journalist with RTHK did an investigative report on it on the RTHK program called "Hong Kong Connection", and the government decided to prosecute her for her investigative methods.

 

The English version of the program:

 

 

 

 

 

The courts rule her to be guilty, and slapped a $6,000 fine on her.  This, after the very same database had been used previously and multiple times for the same purpose by other journalists - pro-establishment or not - with no consequences.  Naturally, the press is worried about its ability to discharge its stated duty, which is to report the truth.

 

An opinion piece from Apple Daily is copied below that touches upon this issue.

 

Excerpt from the article:

Quote

What sets Hong Kong apart from the mainland is in the system, as well as the value system of the people, including their views on freedom. Most mainland Chinese people seek after luxury brand items like cosmetics, clothes, and jewelry, yet they remain indifferent after spiritual luxury items like the freedom of press and freedom of speech. Hongkongers are the complete opposite. Once there was a Chinese student who praised the clear air and freedoms of the U.S. during a commencement speech, and was soon under siege by Chinese netizens for “talking down China, and “betraying the country.” When the CCP snatches away the people’s rights such as freedom of the press and freedom of speech in the mainland, it is met with little resistance, thanks to not only the authority of totalitarianism, but also the tradition of no talking back at the state. However, she who has sailed the seven seas does not think much of mere rivers. The more freedom turns into a luxury pursuit, the more determined the people are going to pursue it.

 

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Editorial: Freedom, once an everyday commodity, now a luxury | Apple Daily Hong Kong

23 hours ago
YCRF5X5P6RDUPMSMKQLWA7JYUE.jpg
 

By Li Ping

RTHK’s Bao Choy Yuk-ling, producer of Hong Kong Connection, has been charged two counts of proving false statements to access a database of license plates during her investigative reporting. She was convicted yesterday and fined HK$6,000 (US$773), becoming the first journalist to be found guilty of accessing public information. The magistrate stressed that the motives behind Bao Choy’s action were not important, which indirectly echoes Carrie Lam’s claim to not understand why journalists should have special rights. When a journalist’s actions of accessing a database stem from public interest, it is not that the journalist has special privileges, but that the media is exercising supervisory power and performing supervisory responsibilities. If journalists are to be prosecuted and convicted for these actions, how is it different from prosecuting and convicting the media? What this does is not to mend the loophole of exposing the privacy of the public, but the public’s right to know.

The intention of the government to prosecute Bao Choy is crystal clear. Firstly, to target the Hong Kong Connection episode “7.21 Who Owns the Truth?”, produced by Bao Choy, was to target the truth of 7.21 [July 21 2019 Yuen Long Attack]. 7.21 was a turning point in public opinion in the Anti-ELAB movement. As described by the IPCC report, “The Yuen Long Incident and Police-triad collusion became a slogan driving escalation of the protests after 21 July.” Chief Secretary for Administration Matthew Cheung once admitted that the handling of the incident by the police was a letdown for the public, and that the government was willing to apologize. However, the government had since then denied furiously the accusation of collusion between the police and the triads, and even turned the victims from plaintiffs to defendants. “7.21 Who Owns the Truth” that recently won the Kam Yiu-yu Press Freedom Award was a showcase for the media to investigate the truth, and therefore naturally became the thorn in the eyes of Carrie Lam’s government.

Secondly, to target RTHK’s programs like Hong Kong Connection was to target RTHK. The prosecution of Bao Choy is a warning to the RTHK staffers behind programs like Hong Kong Connection, which often offer oppositional voices. However, even if this kind of intimidation is effective, the effect could be delayed. Therefore the government assigned Patrick Li to take over RTHK, and directly and brutally withdrew programs like Hong Kong Connection, Hong Kong Story, LegCo Review, etc., let alone the existence of the likes of Bao Choy and Nabela Qoser within RTHK.

Thirdly, it was to target news interview tools and aimed at the freedom of the press and monitoring by the public. Accessing databases is an important method for the media and other institutions to conduct investigations, through which illegal constructions by government officials, election fraud, and arbitrage cases were exposed so that the public knows. To say that access to public records could be “weaponized”, as claimed by Carrie Lam, then it is a weapon to expose bureaucratic corruption and malfeasance. Just like in the statement put forth by the Journalists Association, the fine imposed by the court on Bao Choy was a fine imposed on all journalists, and that the government is objectively assisting those in power to conceal the truth.

Bao Choy said that she did not agree with the court’s decision of making tools used by journalists to investigate the truth “a crime” and that she firmly believed that “registry search” was not a crime, and that “freedom of the press” was not a crime. This sentiment is shared among all conscientious Hong Kong journalists. If newsgathering is a crime, doesn’t it make media surveillance a capital crime? Under the guise of the rule of law, the CCP and the Hong Kong commies are using all sorts of legislative and judicial means to try to silence Hong Kong’s journalists and push media outlets to close down voluntarily. Will they succeed?

What is more chilling is that in today’s Hong Kong, not only is the freedom of press violated, but so are freedom of speech, academic freedom, the right to assembly and procession, the right to stand for election and the right to vote. Freedoms and the rule of law used to be the core values that made Hongkongers proud. They were the pillars of Hong Kong as an international financial center. They were everywhere in people’s daily lives, no different from air. Yet, freedom in Hong Kong has turned from an everyday commodity to a luxury item. To achieve freedom, the price to pay is getting higher and higher.

What sets Hong Kong apart from the mainland is in the system, as well as the value system of the people, including their views on freedom. Most mainland Chinese people seek after luxury brand items like cosmetics, clothes, and jewelry, yet they remain indifferent after spiritual luxury items like the freedom of press and freedom of speech. Hongkongers are the complete opposite. Once there was a Chinese student who praised the clear air and freedoms of the U.S. during a commencement speech, and was soon under siege by Chinese netizens for “talking down China, and “betraying the country.” When the CCP snatches away the people’s rights such as freedom of the press and freedom of speech in the mainland, it is met with little resistance, thanks to not only the authority of totalitarianism, but also the tradition of no talking back at the state. However, she who has sailed the seven seas does not think much of mere rivers. The more freedom turns into a luxury pursuit, the more determined the people are going to pursue it.

Click here for Chinese version

 

https://hk.appledaily.com/opinion/20210423/6VUORAUKYFEIDJMXVTZ4T6S2JU/

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Another opinion piece from Apple Daily.  I share this not so much because of the opinion, but more because of two things: first, he touches upon the conversations he's had with people who have the hard question of what to do under the circumstances of historical freedoms being shut down one by one, and second (but more importantly) he touches upon the stealth work being done by the government to amend the immigration laws to limit access not only to those wanting to go to HK, but also (and quite crucially) the ability for anyone (including HK residents) to leave for any reason.  

 

Who needs arbitrary detention and a kangaroo court filled with ccp mouthpieces when you can just deny access to transport out of HK for any number of bull$&!# reasons?

 

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To enter and exit Hong Kong freely|Edward Chin

14 hours ago
FZXOUXVR3NDERPI2RYJ4HLRVE4.jpg
 

Nowadays, it is difficult to do long-term thinking, especially if you are a Hong Konger residing in Hong Kong. June 30, 2020, @ 11:00pm. The date and time sends a chill down the spine to most Hong Kongers. It was the start of the nightmare: the enactment of the National Security Law (NSL) for Hong Kong. Around 100 Hong Kongers have been arrested, and detained before trial, for violating the NSL. The deadline for this opinion piece was Friday morning that fell by chance on my birthday I was not in the mood for celebrating this year given the uncertain times. But I will tell you my most sincere birthday wish at the end of this article.

To survive and be precise, I think more in terms of how things will spin out in 90 days - a quarter, as everything is so unpredictable. Some people might think that because I am a trader, it becomes second nature to me to think about Hong Kong and the world from a quarterly perspective. Yes and no. Working on today’s article on my birthday, I was thinking more about what else I can contribute to this city, as the Beijing masters are not giving Hong Kongers oxygen and breathing space. Conversations these days with young finance professionals and those engaging in media-related work are quite surreal: staying or leaving, and whether those who have decided to leave will even want to come back.

A financial reporter that I recently conversed with told me that he had safely landed in the United Kingdom. Good for him. He will restart his life. As he is working on the final level of a financial professional designation, I think he will set out to find a job in London soon. As for case two, which I cannot tell much, it is about someone who used to play a part in a “sensitive area” for years. She has recently Signaled me from afar while refraining from telling me where she was. She had her degree from one of Hong Kong’s universities years ago. She was not ranked high in the organization, but had access to a lot of political and business contacts, knew much about dealings in grey areas, above and under the table, and she was worried about just knowing too much. She sought advice from me about registration for a course at some vocational schools in one of the Five Eyes (US, Canada, UK, New Zealand and Australia) and EU, a two-year business administration diploma of sorts, or even an internet security diploma. She already left Hong Kong in a low-profile way. She suspected she had been put on the watch list for the sensitive nature of her work, and she hadn’t been feeling any easy, especially after the enactment of the NSL. She thought she had been given a “death sentence” to her career from within the establishment ̶ she knew “too much”, and her relentless pursuit of drilling deeply for facts could be problematic. She might just as well never come back.

As to the third case, there is a proprietor of a one-man financial public relations firm who will leave Hong Kong for good. For him, he has noticed that the management and corporate culture of many Hong Kong Listcos have been overtaken by leadership and governance by executives from the mainland. The number of mainland firms listed in the Hong Kong Stock Exchange has been on the rise. The focus of their investor relations, marketing and public relations campaign has been moving towards the mainland market and mentality. As such, corporates now prefer to engage public relations consultants who think more like their management that embraces the values and culture of the mainland. My PR friend has decided to say good-bye to Hong Kong.

I am not surprised to see veteran journalist Michael Chugani, who was born in Hong Kong, call it quits for his weekly TV show on political affairs and take a break from writing for two pro-establishment newspapers. Michael is perceived as having changed his political stance after the water cannon incident during the social movement in 2019, in which his elder brother Mohan Chugani was assaulted. The stakes put on writing anything critically are too high now even for someone who works for pro-establishment platforms. More and more people do think that in Q2 and Q3, the political purge will extend to some media outlets including Next Media, journalists, commentators and editors who support free speech, but obviously don’t toe the “party line.”.

In my opinion piece “Anything can happen in Hong Kong now” released two weeks ago, I talked quite vividly about the story of Christianne Ho, a bodybuilding athlete who was questioned by plainclothesmen after she landed at Hong Kong airport. One of the persons mentioned in today’s piece told me something similar, but this applies to outbound travelers going through the immigration checkpoint. He tried to leave Hong Kong through an electronic turnstile for Hong Kong ID holders, but it wouldn’t let him through. So, he had to go to a manned immigration counter. After the immigration officer checked his Hong Kong ID card and passport for a few minutes, he was finally let go, and he rushed to the departure gate.

As far as I have heard from different sources, there are indeed a lot of plain clothes “security officers” patrolling inside the unrestricted departure area, and more so, in the restricted areas as well. It is widely believed that these “non-travellers” inside Hong Kong International Airport are NSL police officers. The government has beefed up the security of the airport, but the atmosphere makes you feel like you are in a war-zone area.

Under the directive from Beijing, the Hong Kong government is in the final stage of amending the city’s immigration laws to enable security personnel to ban a passenger from taking any form of transport, be it flight or vessel, entering or exiting Hong Kong. And with the social credit system probably to be implemented in the near future in Hong Kong, it is very likely that a group of people would not know whether they are free to leave the city until they try their luck at the gate. This is extremely disturbing, and we can forget the “one country, two systems” model completely with regard to the freedom of entry into and exit from Hong Kong.

Seven to ten years from now, the first batch of NSL political prisoners will be released. While living in Hong Kong, they will still be heavily monitored. It might become quite surreal that the activists who have finished their prison sentences might even need special permission to leave Hong Kong every time they want to do so. All the restrictive and extreme measures undertaken thus far by the totalitarian regime does not make Hong Kong look good. My birthday wish and prayer is simple: free all political prisoners, and free Hong Kong.

(Edward Chin (錢志健) runs a family office. Chin was formerly Country Head of a UK publicly listed hedge fund, the largest of its kind measured by asset under management. Outside the hedge funds space, Chin is Convenor of 2047 Hong Kong Monitor and a Senior Advisor of Reporters Without Borders (RSF, HK & Macau). Chin studied speech communication at the University of Minnesota, and received his MBA from the University of Toronto. Twitter: edwardckchin Youtube: Ed Chin Channel Facebook.com/edckchin Email: edckchin@gmail.com)

 

 

 

https://hk.appledaily.com/opinion/20210424/ARLT7GMGU5HGLLZH77PYO3PZVI/

 

On an unrelated note, I think the fellow that wrote this opinion piece was once interviewed by the CBC's Adrienne Arsenault on one of the segments for The National during the 2019 anti-extradition law protests.

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I love how the RTHK English News site is (covertly?  in plain sight?  both?) giving their bosses the middle finger, even after the major shakedown that asshole career bureaucrat Patrick Li has given the station.  My guess is that most of the new management either hasn't got a firm grip of the English language to realize that the English side is still reporting independently of their newly-imposed requirements, or they have no idea (or can't be bothered) to look at the English side of their website.

 

Spoiler
Quote

Bao Choy's 7.21 documentary wins human rights prize

2021-05-06 HKT 13:01
RTHK's documentary on the Yuen Long gang attack was praised for 'chasing the smallest clues, interrogating the powerful without fear or favour'.
  • RTHK's documentary on the Yuen Long gang attack was praised for 'chasing the smallest clues, interrogating the powerful without fear or favour'.
 
An RTHK documentary into the Yuen Long gang rampage in July 2019 won another award on Thursday, two weeks after one of its producers was convicted over her investigative work for the programme.

There is also recognition in this year's Human Rights Press Awards for Nabela Qoser, who is being let go by the broadcaster following complaints by pro-Beijing figures.

“In a year of a pandemic lockdowns, political upheaval in Hong Kong, and protests across the region, the winning entries… showcase courage and originality of journalistic storytelling about human rights in Asia,” said the Foreign Correspondents’ Club, Amnesty International Hong Kong, and the Hong Kong Journalists Association, which together organise the annual awards.

Choy's documentary, "7.21 Who owns the truth?", won this year's Chinese-language documentary prize.

“Chasing the smallest clues, interrogating the powerful without fear or favour. An investigative reporting classic,” the judging panel said of the RTHK entry, which was also produced by Paul Lee, Sze-Sze Cheng, Flora Yeung, Judy Chan and Yiu-ling Wong.

Choy was fined HK$6,000 last month after a court found her guilty of making false declarations while searching for the owners of cars believed to be linked to the mob violence. She said on Wednesday that she will appeal against her conviction.

“Salute to all winners who uncover the truth, and speak out for the voiceless across the globe. There are so many stunning, heartbreaking and breathtaking stories,” Choy wrote in a tweet.

“The award is just a reminder for all of us to uphold our faith and principles.”

An entry from RTHK English News’ Joanne Wong was also awarded a merit in the Short Video (English) category.

Her report looked into how families in Hong Kong had been divided as a result of the 2019 anti-government protests, with members unable to reconcile their conflicting political views.

The government broadcaster collected five merits in addition to its win in the documentary category, with Qoser picking up two awards for videos she helped produce.

The Yuen Long documentary also took this year's Kam Yiu-yu Press Freedom Award.

However, RTHK will not be accepting any awards during a “transition period”, as a review of its operations is conducted by the new Director of Broadcasting, Patrick Li.

In March, organisers of the Human Rights Press Awards said Li had asked them to withdraw RTHK's entries "in totality", but they said they were unable to comply with his request as judging was already underway.

There will be no awards ceremony this year for the Human Rights Press Awards, because of the pandemic.

 

https://news.rthk.hk/rthk/en/component/k2/1589507-20210506.htm

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