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Ryan Strome

$22/hr is average wage needed to afford a two-bedroom apartment in Canada: report

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4 minutes ago, xereau said:

 

Nope, because that's nothing more than a bandaid fix.

 

Say a 22 dollar guaranteed minimum wage is legislated.

 

Inflation will absolutely skyrocket, and $22 will be the current equivalent in just a few years.

 

What then? 44 bucks an hour? Then 100? This is how countries die.

 

Canada's fiat banking, and its inflationary/deflationary system by where they turn pixels on a screen (hypothetical wealth called a loan, which quite literally comes from nowhere), into real estate (actual hard asset), is both disgusting and predatory.

 

Look into who owns stocks from the Bank of Canada.  It, like the US Federal Reserve Bank, is a privately owned for profit enterprise, and has nothign to do with the Canadian citizens it allegedly serves heheh.


Hint: not many Canadians own stock.

I thought there was a rule with Canadian banks that 70% of their stock must be owned by Canadians, 30% for foriegn investors?

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Just now, Bure_Pavel said:

I thought there was a rule with Canadian banks that 70% of their stock must be owned by Canadians, 30% for foriegn investors?

There are tiers of banks. There is a bank, called the Bank of Canada, which loans to all of the other public banks you know and hate.

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21 minutes ago, NewbieCanuckFan said:

Or get a roommate and split the costs.

Or live in a basement suit studio with that roommate too, and save some money.  Just because a person grows up in an area doesn't mean they have a right to afford living there.  Move to where you can afford, and commute.  Or live with several roommates in the cheapest place you can find, and save your pennies.  Work hard and get better paying jobs.  That's the way a capitalist, compete for what you have, system works.  Socialism, where life is too free, doesn't work.  There is no incentive to do more, and be better.  

Aren't there expensive condo towers in town with units subsidized by the government for those who can't afford to pay the full price?  Is that the way a capitalist system should work?  Only those who need help from the government should get it.  The able people need to work harder.  Simple.  

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7 minutes ago, kingofsurrey said:

Any business if well managed can afford to pay 20 per hour ......

Are you going to pay $18 for a McDonalds meal?

 

That's what people don't get - if you raise the wages - you have to raise the product - else no profit.

 

My son noticed that when the min went up to $15 - costs almost $11 for a 1/4 lb with cheese meal now.  
In other words - he's not actually making any more money - as the cost of living has gone up.

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18 minutes ago, BrockBoester said:

Good thing the minimum wage is like 12 or 13 bucks then eh lol

 

Oh well I make at least 22.01 an hour so I'm livin large, boys

It's $13.85 right now in BC, It will be $ 15.20 by June 2021.

 

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16 minutes ago, Bure_Pavel said:

No thats not how economics works, that just raises the cost of living as well and solves nothing. Need more job creation, people should think about that before they prioritize climate change over a strong economy.  

 

15 minutes ago, riffraff said:

If I have to pay 20$ for a totally unskilled newb I’ll just not hire.

 

11 minutes ago, xereau said:

 

Nope, because that's nothing more than a bandaid fix.

 

this has been the argument against every raise in the min wage, and even for the idea of a min wage. $20 works fine for the Aussies. 

 

But - IF we could get our governments to get off their hineys and build the co-op style housing needed to fix this crisis, we woudn't need a $20 min wage. 

Edited by Jimmy McGill
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12 minutes ago, xereau said:

 

Nope, because that's nothing more than a bandaid fix.

 

Say a 22 dollar guaranteed minimum wage is legislated.

 

Inflation will absolutely skyrocket, and $22 will be the current equivalent in just a few years.

 

What then? 44 bucks an hour? Then 100? This is how countries die.

 

Canada's fiat banking, and its inflationary/deflationary system by where they turn pixels on a screen (hypothetical wealth called a loan, which quite literally comes from nowhere), into real estate (actual hard asset), is both disgusting and predatory.

 

Look into who owns stocks from the Bank of Canada.  It, like the US Federal Reserve Bank, is a privately owned for profit enterprise, and has nothign to do with the Canadian citizens it allegedly serves heheh.


Hint: not many Canadians own stock.

I’m self employed in trades since 2004.  Small time.  Between 1-3 employees full time and some subbing out of contracts.  Assuming I hire at 20$ for green off the street workers, can I pass that increase off to my contractor/developer by increasing my rate?

 

short answer: no fn way

 

slightly less short answer:  yes but then the cost for building of said residences goes up and we are all back to square one.

Edited by riffraff
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Just now, Jimmy McGill said:

 

 

this has been the argument for every raise in the min wage, and even for the idea of a min wage. $20 works fine for the Aussies. 

 

But - IF we could get our governments to get off their hineys and build the co-op style housing needed to fix this crisis, we woudn't need a $20 min wage. 

Its the cities, the planners, who limit availability of housing.


Government regulation is the problem in the first place.

 

We do not need more of it.

 

Let people rent what rooms they want, to who they want.

 

If anything in this country is a criminal racket, it is the vacancy rate manipulation by the biggest mafia in town, aka, the civic government.

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2 minutes ago, Jimmy McGill said:

 

 

this has been the argument against every raise in the min wage, and even for the idea of a min wage. $20 works fine for the Aussies. 

 

But - IF we could get our governments to get off their hineys and build the co-op style housing needed to fix this crisis, we woudn't need a $20 min wage. 

If we could trim gvt period there wouldn’t be a problem.

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It's &^@#ed, the costs of housing continue to inflate beyond the means of most people. It's a complex issue. Raising the minimum wage doesn't help if the costs of living aren't being regulated as well. When you bump up the wage everything just jumps ever so slightly in response, the illusion of more buying power is mostly an illusion. 

 

In a capitalist society small business owners can't compete with billion dollar companies financially and therefore offer fewer jobs as wages increase. People wanna rent out rooms and suites and have someone else pay their mortgage and whatnot, knowing full well that somebody out there will pay what they're asking because of supply and demand. People dismissively invalidate those worker "lesser" jobs telling them to go find something more lucrative as if that's an easy and simple thing to do, life isn't that simple and the pool of people vying for those opportunities is much larger than the number of opportunities. 

 

I'm an islander, I'm pushing 30 and I'm back in uni doing what people so flippantly tell people to do, I'm chasing "a better" job. Who knows what the market will be like when I graduate given how people leaving the mainland are driving up the cost of living here. It's beyond frustrating and it's incredibly discouraging. I don't feel entitled to some fancy home but it'd be nice to not be gouged for wanting a roof over my head. I struggle in today's economy and it's not because of a lack of hard work on my end, there are so many people out there in similar situations. It's a contributing factor to childbirth being on the decline the last decade, people can't afford to live let alone raise children.

Edited by Coconuts
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30 minutes ago, Bure_Pavel said:

There are afforable places to rent in Canada, and if you get a room mate thats only $11/hour well below the minimum wage.  

Canadians shouldn't be forced to raise families with room mates. Also it should be possible for some to live alone if they want to.

 

30 minutes ago, NewbieCanuckFan said:

Or get a roommate and split the costs.

See above. 

24 minutes ago, CaptKirk888 said:

What if you already have a roommate (wife), and 2 other dependants (kids)?

Exactly. 

19 minutes ago, Jimmy McGill said:

pretty good argument to raise min wage to $20/hr isn't it? 

 

We can actually have affordable housing in Canada, but our 3 level of gov't aren't doing nearly enough about it. There is more than enough municipal, provincial and federal land available to build 100s of thousands of affordable co-op units, but very little is happening. Its a model thats worked in many places (the development in false creek in Vancouver in the 1980s is a good example).

No it isn't because everytime minimum wage goes up rental units go up. Believe I don't want to see house prices fall but this isn't sustainable. 

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24 minutes ago, Bure_Pavel said:

Then get a job that pays $22/hour or make your wife get a job too. 

Wouldn't everyone if they could?

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Just now, Jimmy McGill said:

 

 

this has been the argument for every raise in the min wage, and even for the idea of a min wage. $20 works fine for the Aussies. 

 

But - IF we could get our governments to get off their hineys and build the co-op style housing needed to fix this crisis, we woudn't need a $20 min wage. 

I disagree with all of this. There is no crisis that is not self inflicted. Why should I have/get the pleasure of paying for people's housing to get to live in a desirable area who can't otherwise afford it, because it's their choice to live there, while I don't get to live there in order to pay for it for "you" / them?

 

Get a job/lifestyle/living arrangement that can sustain ones' desires, or move to somewhere that can. Plenty of places to do that in Canada. They are not apparently as desirable (I'd disagree with that anyway, having left that bubble a long time ago) as the lower mainland but hell, I like my 4 minute commute, freehold house and the financial ability to do my big international trip every year because I don't spend 80% of my money on "rent and food" like I would if I were in Vancouver on the same money.

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12 minutes ago, CaptKirk888 said:

What if you already have a roommate (wife), and 2 other dependants (kids)?

You're basically &^@#ed.

 

I feel bad for people that work their asses off not even close to having a wage of $20/hr and basically struggling to provide for themselves/family.  

 

Life is tough and wish it could be a bit easier for folks

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Just now, xereau said:

Its the cities, the planners, who limit availability of housing.


Government regulation is the problem in the first place.

 

We do not need more of it.

 

Let people rent what rooms they want, to who they want.

 

If anything in this country is a criminal racket, it is the vacancy rate manipulation by the biggest mafia in town, aka, the civic government.

we disagree here. I'll use the False Creek example again - that was built on city land at the time that was reclaimed industrial land that was easily converted to an area for co-op construction. Cities (and other levels) have billions in unused land all over the country that can be turned into tax generating homes. Even partially subsidized homes still generate some tax base, and the government (i.e. all of us) still own the asset of the land. But the building costs are vastly reduced since no one has to buy the land. Its a good model that works well.

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7 minutes ago, Heretic said:

Are you going to pay $18 for a McDonalds meal?

 

That's what people don't get - if you raise the wages - you have to raise the product - else no profit.

 

My son noticed that when the min went up to $15 - costs almost $11 for a 1/4 lb with cheese meal now.  
In other words - he's not actually making any more money - as the cost of living has gone up.

Well, someone gets it.  More money is the problem, as counterintuitive as that sounds.

 

This is why the idea of cryptocurrency is so interesting to so many people, because you can not simply print more of it. It is inherently inflation proof.

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6 minutes ago, Jimmy McGill said:

 

 

this has been the argument against every raise in the min wage, and even for the idea of a min wage. $20 works fine for the Aussies. 

 

But - IF we could get our governments to get off their hineys and build the co-op style housing needed to fix this crisis, we woudn't need a $20 min wage. 

I heard a can of beer is like 6 dollars there...

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2 minutes ago, brownky said:

I disagree with all of this. There is no crisis that is not self inflicted. Why should I have/get the pleasure of paying for people's housing to get to live in a desirable area who can't otherwise afford it, because it's their choice to live there, while I don't get to live there in order to pay for it for "you" / them?

 

Get a job/lifestyle/living arrangement that can sustain ones' desires, or move to somewhere that can. Plenty of places to do that in Canada. They are not apparently as desirable (I'd disagree with that anyway, having left that bubble a long time ago) as the lower mainland but hell, I like my 4 minute commute, freehold house and the financial ability to do my big international trip every year because I don't spend 80% of my money on "rent and food" like I would if I were in Vancouver on the same money.

you wouldn't be paying for anyones housing 

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