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2021 NHL Entry Draft


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9 minutes ago, Bertuzzipunch said:

If i had a subscription I definitely wouldve done that for you guys. 
 

i got that pic from twitter

What we need...is a good man now.  Someone to go behind the scenes

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1 hour ago, nergish said:

I've seen that phrase thrown around too much for my liking - Clarke's "knock-kneed skating"... and to be honest I'm not really sure that's even a thing. 

His speed is one of his most appealing elements as a prospect, he just isn't as graceful as a Hughes boy. He moves around the ice perfectly well, and is every bit a new-age defender. When I'm judging a player's skating, it's really more about how much ice they cover... not the way they position their knees.

 

I just don't buy that Clarke (a 6'2 190lbs, high IQ defender) is a "2nd pairing, PP specialist". His game seems very well-rounded to me, way more so than L. Hughes for example.

In fact, from what I've seen I'd say he's easily the second best Dman in this draft class, and probably 3rd-4th overall in my books.

Skating

Clarke’s game is based on his outstanding skating ability. This allows him to get forward in the offensive zone as well as join the rush, and still get back defensively. He has an outstanding first step and great acceleration. His ability to change speeds allows him to avoid forecheckers and get past defenders. His top-end speed is also very good. Clarke’s edgework and agility are elite. He can turn on a dime, and can also walk the line, opening up passing and shooting lanes in the offensive zone. Clarke could stand to get a bit stronger in his core though. This will help improve his balance and strength on his skates. It will help him to win battles in the defensive zone and clear the front of the net.

 

https://lastwordonsports.com/hockey/2021/04/16/brandt-clarke-scouting-report/

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If Clarke goes at 8 I’ll be choked but if we get McTavish at 9 I’ll be good just sad we were so close to getting Clarke lol

 

i don’t think that’s how the draft goes but very possible

 

interesting to see edvinsson that low
 

no Sillinger or Lysell and very high on luscius

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1 hour ago, Warhippy said:

What we need...is a good man now.  Someone to go behind the scenes

 

1 hour ago, Amaneey said:

Pronmans top 15 rankings:

 

TIER 1: Projected NHL All-Star

 

Owen Power, LHD, Michigan-Big Ten Nov. 22, 2002 | 6-foot-6 | 213 pounds 

Skating: Average

Puck Skills: Below-average

Hockey Sense: Above-average

Compete: Average 

Power had a great freshman season as one of the best defensemen in his conference while also one of its youngest, and played a key role for Canada in its gold medal run at the world championships. Power’s offensive toolkit won’t jump out immediately to you, but a 6-foot-6 defenseman who can skate at the NHL level and move the puck well is a major asset. His skating isn’t explosive, but his stride and edgework are excellent, and he can evade pressure very well. Power’s offense comes from a great first pass and an ability to find seams in the offensive zone well. I question if he will be a go-to power play type, but I can for sure see him on PP2 and can be PP1 in a pinch. Defensively he’s not that physical, but he closes on checks well with his range and reach, and breaks up a lot of plays. In a sentence, Power projects as a star all-situations NHL defenseman who won’t land on highlight reels but will play tough minutes and drive play. 

 

TIER 2: Projected bubble all-star/top of lineup player

 

Dylan Guenther, RW, Edmonton-WHL April 10, 2003 | 6-foot-2 | 175 pounds 

Skating: Average

Puck Skills: Average

Hockey Sense: Average

Compete: Above-average

Shot: Above-average 

Guenther had a great limited WHL season, scoring two points per game (24 points in 12 games) for the Oil Kings following his great underage season, although his U18 worlds were good but not as inspiring. Guenther is a forward with a lot of NHL attributes. He has great skill, and can make skilled plays through defenders and to teammates at an NHL pace. He can make some plays through seams while also having the shot to score from a distance. He has a lot of talent, but also works off the puck, forcing turnovers and playing in traffic, even if he’s not overly physical. In a sentence, Guenther may not be a true game breaker in the NHL, but he projects as a top-line forward who will endear himself to fans and coaches. 

 

TIER 3: Projected top of the lineup player

 

William Eklund, LW, Djurgarden-SHL Oct. 12, 2002 | 5-foot-10 | 176 pounds 

Skating: High-end

Puck Skills: Average

Hockey Sense: Above-average

Compete: Above-average 

Eklund was an important player on an SHL team as an 18-year-old — a rare feat for a first-year draft-eligible player — and played well for Sweden’s national team. He has good, not great, straightaway speed to go along with fantastic edgework. He shows tremendous elusiveness to evade pressure and create space with his skating. Eklund skates fast, but it’s his skating plus his compete that earned the trust of big minutes as he showed he could be responsible off the puck. He combines that with a high skill level, a very imaginative hockey IQ offensively and the ability to execute difficult plays at speed. His ability to play in the high-traffic areas and win battles, but also play on the perimeter and be a primary set-up guy, will make him a versatile NHL player. In a sentence, Eklund projects as an undersized first-line NHL winger with dynamic attributes. 

 

Luke Hughes, LHD, U.S. NTDP-USHL Sept. 9, 2003 | 6-foot-2 | 184 pounds 

Skating: High-end

Puck Skills: Average

Hockey Sense: Average

Compete: Average 

Hughes had a strong season, as a leading player for the U.S. NTDP, but a late-season injury kept him from playing at the U18 worlds. Hughes is a 6-foot-2 elite-skating defenseman with offensive ability, which is a highly appealing toolkit for an NHL projection. Like his brothers Jack and Quinn, Luke’s edgework is fantastic, showing great ability to elude checks. His skating and skill combination allow him to generate a lot of controlled exits and entries. His playmaking isn’t at the same level as his brothers, but he has enough skill and vision to be on an NHL power play and be a driver at the top level. The size and skating combination should allow him to make stops as a pro, but currently his D-zone coverage isn’t completely refined, as he needs to work on his gaps. He can be a bit risky and turnover prone with the puck, and managing that is a main area of concern with scouts. In a sentence, Hughes projects as a top-pair defenseman who can be on a power play and be elite in transition, but will have issues matching up versus top players. 

 

Matthew Beniers, C, Michigan-Big Ten Nov. 5, 2002 | 6-foot-2 | 175 pounds 

Skating: Average

Puck Skills: Below-average

Hockey Sense: Average

Compete: High-end 

Beniers is the top center prospect in this draft. He has a quality NHL-caliber skill set but not a lot jumps off the page. He is a top prospect because he is an elite competitor and makes the most of his toolkit every game. I’ve seen him play nearly a hundred games over the last three years between the U.S. NTDP, college and international competitions, and I can count on one hand the times he’s never made an impact on a game. His work ethic shows through how hard he forechecks and backchecks, how every play is made with speed, how he wins a ton of battles, and how fearless he is getting to the high-traffic areas. Beniers wills his way to puck possession and scoring chances, while also able to set up a lot of plays. In a sentence, Beniers projects as a top-two line center, a No. 2 on a Stanley Cup contender or a low-end No. 1, who can score at a reasonable rate for those roles and provide high-end value off the puck. 

 

Kent Johnson, C, Michigan-Big Ten Oct. 18, 2002 | 6-foot-1 | 167 pounds 

Skating: Below-average

Puck Skills: Elite Hockey

Sense: Average

Compete: Average 

Johnson is the player you want to know about in this year’s draft in terms of dynamic skill and playmaking ability. A lot of his puck touches look unique from other players on the ice, with the ability to make between-the-legs and behind-the-back plays look routine. He’s a very creative playmaker who can make difficult plays in small areas consistently but can overcomplicate at times. Johnson has a decent wrist shot, which he showed more in junior than college. His game can lack pace and he’s not that hard to play against, but I wouldn’t call him soft either. In a sentence, Johnson projects as a top-line NHL forward, likely on the wing, who has the most star potential in the draft but also has the most significant physical drawbacks of the top prospects. 

 

TIER: 4: Projected bubble top/middle of lineup or quality starting goaltender

 

Chaz Lucius, C, U.S. NTDP-USHL May 2, 2003 | 6-foot-1 | 185 pounds 

Skating: Below-average

Puck Skills: Above-average

Hockey Sense: Average

Compete: Above-average 

Lucius missed most of the season with various injuries but when healthy he showed what he did in his underage season, in that he could score a lot of goals and drive a team’s offense. Lucius is one of the most purely skilled players in the draft, with elite one-on-one skills and the ability to make defenders miss. He is known for his goal scoring, but he has good vision and can find seams and create in tight areas. His scoring is less due to an elite shot and where he scores. If you saw a heat map for his shots, it’s a big blob in front of the crease. Lucius lacks physicality and defensive value off the puck but he generates a lot of offense by going to the net. His skating is a concern and he will likely not be able to separate at the NHL level. In a sentence, Lucius projects as a strong top-six NHL forward who can be on a top power-play unit in a bumper/net position. 

 

Brandt Clarke, RHD, Barrie-OHL Feb. 9, 2003 | 6-foot-2 | 185 pounds 

Skating: Below-average

Puck Skills: Above-average

Hockey Sense: Average

Compete: Average 

Clarke went to Slovakia because there was no OHL season and was quite good. He is a dynamic player with the puck because of his puck skills and playmaking ability. He has the poise and vision to make tough plays from both ends of the rink. He can beat opponents with his skill consistently and looks unique with the puck on his stick, with true first power-play unit potential in the NHL. The concern on Clarke is his skating as he’s a somewhat knock-kneed skater without great quickness. He defends well in junior due to his sense and having decent reach, but the pace will be a concern in that regard as he advances levels. In a sentence, Clarke projects as a second or third defenseman who can be on a top NHL power-play unit but may not be able to face top opponents defensively. 

 

Mason McTavish, C, Peterborough-OHL Jan. 30, 2003 | 6-foot-1 | 207 pounds 

Skating: Below-average

Puck Skills: Average

Hockey Sense: Average

Compete: Above-average

Shot: Above-average 

McTavish was good in Switzerland’s second-tier pro league, with the OHL season canceled, and great at the U18 worlds for Canada. McTavish has always shown he can score — and in numbers. He can attack defenses in numerous ways in the offensive zone with his NHL-caliber skill, vision and shot. He is a creative player who tries to make things happen. He has the shot to score from range versus pros and is very good at creating around the net. He works hard enough to win a lot of puck battles. The main flaw in McTavish’s skill set is his skating, as he will be OK in the NHL in that regard but will struggle to create separation. In a sentence, McTavish projects as a strong top-six forward in the NHL, a second-line center or a low-end first-line wing. 

 

Sebastian Cossa, G, Edmonton-WHL Nov. 21, 2002 | 6-foot-6 | 210 pounds 

Athleticism: Average

Hockey Sense: Average 

Cossa has been as good as you could have asked him to be in the WHL, dominating the league for the last two seasons. His athletic toolkit is very intriguing as a 6-foot-6 goalie who can move very well for that size. He covers a lot of net with his length. He has some quick twitch in his frame in how he moves around the net, and gets in and out of his butterfly. Cossa’s reads are typically great. He loses track of some pucks and can be a bit busy in the net but usually anticipates the play very well. I love his selective aggressiveness with his positioning, and how he takes away angles with his size as well as how well he uses his stick to break up a lot of plays. In a sentence, Cossa projects as a quality NHL starting goaltender with the potential to become an upper-echelon goalie. 

 

Jesper Wallstedt, G, Lulea-SHL Nov. 14, 2002 | 6-foot-3 | 214 pounds 

Athleticism: Below-average

Hockey Sense: Above-average 

Wallstedt started off very well, as a rare first-year draft-eligible to not only play but also excel in the SHL. He fell off in the second half, but his body of work between junior, pro and international is quite strong. Wallstedt’s athletic toolkit doesn’t jump out at you immediately. He’s about 6-foot-3 and moves well but not at an elite level. What makes him such a good goaltender is his tremendous sense and puck-tracking ability. He makes the right read at a remarkably high frequency, with little unnecessary movement in net. Wallstedt can make a tough save when he needs to and has some lateral quickness, but it often seems like he doesn’t have to adjust his technique much on a given save, especially when the puck is in the high-percentage areas. In a sentence, Wallstedt projects as a quality NHL starting goaltender. 

 

TIER 5: Projected middle of lineup player

 

Simon Edvinsson, LHD, Frolunda-SHL Feb. 5, 2003 | 6-foot-4 | 198 pounds 

Skating: Average

Puck Skills: Average

Hockey Sense: Average

Compete: Average 

Edvinsson was impressive in the junior ranks in Sweden. He was good, but not amazing at varying pro levels and was an anchor for Sweden’s U18 team internationally. He stands out instantly as a 6-foot-4 defenseman with legit offensive skill. It’s rare to see a player his size lead a rush or make a play off the blue line and dangle through opponents consistently like he does. Edvinsson is also quite a good skater for his size. His straightaway speed is just OK, but he’s got great edgework, showing the first step and quick turns to elude pressure and create clean exits and entries. Defensively his size and skating allow him to close gaps and make a lot of stops and he’s not afraid to be physical. He’s not a dynamic playmaker, but Edvinsson can make the heads-up first pass and shows some power-play poise. In a sentence, Edvinsson projects as a quality top-four defenseman and on a power-play unit with the potential to play higher in an NHL lineup. 

 

Corson Ceulemans, RHD, Brooks-AJHL May 5, 2003 | 6-foot-2 | 198 pounds 

Skating: Average

Puck Skills: Average

Hockey Sense: Average

Compete: Above-average 

Ceulemans’ season was cut short due to the AJHL’s pause. He was up and down during that season, but his U18 worlds was promising and his underage profile is encouraging. Ceulemans is a complete defenseman as a 6-foot-2, right-shot blueliner who is mobile, hard to play against and has offensive ability. At the AJHL level, he showed great one-on-one skill and the ability to move the puck. He kills a lot of rushes with his skating and physicality and picks off a lot of passes. At the higher levels of play I’ve watched him over the years I’ve questioned if the offense will translate at a top level, particularly the playmaking. But I see enough good things in his puck moving to think he can be a good NHL player. In a sentence, Ceulemans projects as a quality top-four NHL defenseman who could possibly be on a second power-play unit with the potential to play higher in a lineup. 

 

Nikita Chibrikov, RW, SKA-VHL Feb. 16, 2003 | 5-foot-10 | 170 pounds 

Skating: Average

Puck Skills: Average

Hockey Sense: Above-average

Compete: Above-average 

Chibrikov impressed early at the junior level this season, earning a quick promotion to playing versus men where he held his own at the VHL and KHL levels and making an appearance with Russia’s senior team. He was also a top scorer at the U18 worlds with 13 points in seven games. He’s undersized and not an amazing skater for his size, but he’s done well versus pros because of his tremendous playmaking ability and his ability to win battles despite his size. He can make slick one-on-one plays, creative plays under pressure and find seams consistently. He’s physical and responsible defensively. He could be a more explosive skater ideally, but the other elements of his game pop. In a sentence, Chibrikov projects as a top-six forward who will be on an NHL power play. 

 

Matthew Coronato, RW, Chicago-USHL Nov. 14, 2002 | 5-foot-10 | 183 pounds 

Skating: Above-average

Puck Skills: Average

Hockey Sense: Average

Compete: Above-average

Shot: Above-average 

Coronato was one of the best players in the USHL and among the leaders in most offensive categories. Coronato is an undersized forward with a lot of skill who can make plays with pace. He’s a strong skater, not elite for a small guy, but good enough to be an NHL player. He’s able to create controlled entries with his speed and skill, and make tough plays to his teammates on the move. Coronato is also able to play the half-wall on the power play and find seams as well as finish from distance. He killed penalties for Chicago and works hard enough to advance levels and win battles despite his size. In a sentence, Coronato projects as a versatile second-line NHL winger.

My Man <3 

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What do people think about Olen Zellweger? I feel like I've hardly seen him mentioned here. Was one of Canada's top three defensemen at U18s. He's on the small side for a defenseman at 5'10, but his skating is explosive, and good puck skills to go with it. One of the youngest players in the draft as a September 10 birthday. Seems to have some offensive creativity, but I haven't paid close enough attention to get a good read on his hockey IQ.

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9 hours ago, Eddie said:

Top 20. Cole Sillinger, C, Sioux Falls Stampede (USHL)
Another good goal scoring prospect whose stock has probably been affected badly by the pandemic. I do think he is a tier below Lucius with even worse staking. So baring his bloodline or other insider scouting knowledge i find it hard to believe he would go before Lucius, Johnson and McTavish

I would put Sillinger as my alternative top 9-11 guy if all the other higher ranked top 10 forwards and defensemen are gone. I have stated previously I would not take a goalie in the top 10 and I purt a premium on the centre position. 

Sillinger to me is in the Horvat mold and is a guy you can win with. That said I would be happier with the likes of McTavish, Johnson, Guenther et al but Sillinger will be a very good player and is a guy who could help the Canucks and should not be overlooked shoud all these guys go ahead of him.

 

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14 hours ago, Amaneey said:

Simon Edvinsson, LHD, Frolunda-SHL Feb. 5, 2003 | 6-foot-4 | 198 pounds 

Skating: Average

Puck Skills: Average

Hockey Sense: Average

Compete: Average 

Edvinsson was impressive in the junior ranks in Sweden. He was good, but not amazing at varying pro levels and was an anchor for Sweden’s U18 team internationally. He stands out instantly as a 6-foot-4 defenseman with legit offensive skill. It’s rare to see a player his size lead a rush or make a play off the blue line and dangle through opponents consistently like he does. Edvinsson is also quite a good skater for his size. His straightaway speed is just OK, but he’s got great edgework, showing the first step and quick turns to elude pressure and create clean exits and entries. Defensively his size and skating allow him to close gaps and make a lot of stops and he’s not afraid to be physical. He’s not a dynamic playmaker, but Edvinsson can make the heads-up first pass and shows some power-play poise. In a sentence, Edvinsson projects as a quality top-four defenseman and on a power-play unit with the potential to play higher in an NHL lineup. 

I don't agree with this at all.  Edvinsson is quite elusive on skates and his skating just looks awkward due to his size.  If you watch him play, he accelerates quite well and his edgework is fantastic.  Top speed may be limited, but he's a defenceman, so acceleration is more important. 

Compete is also much higher than just average.  Again, just watch him play.

Puck skills is higher than average too.  He stickhandles very well in traffic.

In the write-up, he even talks about all of this lol :blink:

 

I'd rate him more like this:

Skating: Above Average

Puck Skills:  Above Average

Hockey Sense:  Average

Compete:  Above Average

 

TIER 3:  Projected top of the lineup player

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1 hour ago, HKSR said:

I don't agree with this at all.  Edvinsson is quite elusive on skates and his skating just looks awkward due to his size.  If you watch him play, he accelerates quite well and his edgework is fantastic.  Top speed may be limited, but he's a defenceman, so acceleration is more important. 

Compete is also much higher than just average.  Again, just watch him play.

Puck skills is higher than average too.  He stickhandles very well in traffic.

In the write-up, he even talks about all of this lol :blink:

 

I'd rate him more like this:

Skating: Above Average

Puck Skills:  Above Average

Hockey Sense:  Average

Compete:  Above Average

 

TIER 3:  Projected top of the lineup player

If Edvinsson gets picked by us, it is in the hopes that he can be Edler 2.0 down the road

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4 minutes ago, Canuckster86 said:

If Edvinsson gets picked by us, it is in the hopes that he can be Edler 2.0 down the road

I think he does everything a bit better than Edler. 

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25 minutes ago, HKSR said:

I think he does everything a bit better than Edler. 

I think Edler has been underrated for quite awhile.  He has had 4 or 5 straight coaches, all with different styles, who relied on him as our top defenseman.  PP, PK, and the most overall minutes essentially for 12 years, through ups and downs, wins and losses and many teammates and coaches.

 

If GMJB thinks Edvinsson is better than Edler and is the bpa, I hope he picks him regardless of current team need.

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3 minutes ago, Dixon Ward said:

I think Edler has been underrated for quite awhile.  He has had 4 or 5 straight coaches, all with different styles, who relied on him as our top defenseman.  PP, PK, and the most overall minutes essentially for 12 years, through ups and downs, wins and losses and many teammates and coaches.

 

If GMJB thinks Edvinsson is better than Edler and is the bpa, I hope he picks him regardless of current team need.

That just goes to show you that we have been lacking high end defensive skill for awhile. 

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2 minutes ago, Dixon Ward said:

I think Edler has been underrated for quite awhile.  He has had 4 or 5 straight coaches, all with different styles, who relied on him as our top defenseman.  PP, PK, and the most overall minutes essentially for 12 years, through ups and downs, wins and losses and many teammates and coaches.

 

If GMJB thinks Edvinsson is better than Edler and is the bpa, I hope he picks him regardless of current team need.

Don't get me wrong.  Edler has been one of this franchises' best defencemen of all time.  He has been a steady top pairing defenceman for years for us.

 

Edvinsson, IMO, does everything a bit better than Edler.  Whether or not he puts it all together in the NHL for an entire career remains to be seen, but I believe that is the reason why Edvinsson was ranked as high as #2 or #3 this past year on draft rankings.  IF he puts it all together, I see him as a #1 all situations defenceman.

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4 minutes ago, Gawdzukes said:

That just goes to show you that we have been lacking high end defensive skill for awhile. 

Sure, but Edler has been a godsend at the 91st overall player.  We have to keep in mind that only a few teams have Lidstroms, Prongers, Karlssons, etc... most teams top defenseman are not Norris Trophy winners.  They are just very good defensemen, which includes Edler.

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