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Coyotes' 'top' (4th round) draft pick of 2020 was a convict four years ago for bullying.

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Dazzle
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3 minutes ago, Zhukini said:

I would never want to see this kid in a Canucks sweater. This isn’t a matter of second chances. 

He had a second chance and that was when the other perpetrators broke down in tears apologizing to their victim and his family. Miller did not, there is no other chance after that point.  

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It's okay, he'll likely amount to nothing anyway. But with that said. All we can do is hope he outgrew that disgusting behaviour and became a man. The things he did are appalling. But if we don't give him a chance to prove he's not that guy anymore we are saying that no matter where you go in life you are defined by the worst things you ever did.

 

Also, I am very sad that this stuff happened to Isaiah Meyer-Crothers but I hope he doesn't stay living in the past. It can't be changed and all it'll do is make him sad. It's easy to say as someone that never went through what he did, but it's all we can do. Live, learn, move on as best we can. Don't let this kid's cruelty keep you in a dark place. 

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14 minutes ago, Dazzle said:

I would be impressed if Mitchell defended this kid against such bullies. But instead, he was an active aggressor who has yet to apologize for his wrongdoings, despite being convicted.

I agree with Robert Long that "I don't know that we really want to live in a society that can't allow a 14 year old to learn from a mistake", but if he's truly made such little effort to own up to his wrongdoings with the individual he abused that's another matter. Perhaps he has grown and learned, given his age at the time I wouldn't be surprised, and he wouldn't be the first child or teenager to make horrible bullying decisions to the extent he apparently did. But learning is only a piece of it, it's one thing if the victim wants nothing to do with his former abuser but to not even make the effort? Obviously his being a minor changes things because of his own developmental level at the time, but that doesn't make such extensive bullying behaviour any less repulsive. I'd imagine most children understand that bullying is wrong on some level. 

 

It's a no-win story. It's a black mark on the Coyotes, his lack of apology is a black mark on Mitchell if true, and his victim has to live with the fact that his bully went on to be drafted by an NHL team along with any other lingering traumatic effects of such bullying. Mitchell can move on, potentially reconcile with his victim and apologize properly, and maybe go on to play pro hockey somewhere. Trauma is an extraordinarily complex thing, and his victim may never fully escape the trauma of his youth. 

Edited by Coconuts
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2 hours ago, Coconuts said:

It might seem like not doing this should be a bit of a no brainer, but children, teenagers, and adults with intellectual disabilities have historically experienced some of the worst treatment from society and individuals. Children with development disabilities often experience more severe and consistent bullying, and at older ages they're more easily taken advantage of. They're one of society's most vulnerable populations, which makes em an easier mark in the eyes of some people.

 

It's not nearly as uncommon a thing as many people would likely expect it to be. 

what happened to the kid in this story is horrible, there's nothing to defend in Millers behaviour. What bothers me is how fast we are now to throw him away for life for something he did as a child. We don't know if he's an abused kid himself, or just an asshole. Either way he's still a teen, and sometimes brain development takes time. Its hard not to look at Miller in disgust, but isn't he a kid that needs help too? I mean who does that without having something broken that needs fixing too? 

 

The concern for me is if we throw Miller away, he gets no help. What kind of parent is that guy going to be if that happens? there's a lot of things to take into considerations with stories like this, isnt there?

 

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48 minutes ago, Dazzle said:

I agree. There are plenty of good people in the Coyotes organization, starting with Barrett Hayton.

 

This Miller pick is monumentally awful.

Hayton should definitely be their next captain. 
 

Kids got a good head on his shoulders and is a top prospect. Polar opposite to what this Miller kid is. 

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The saddest thing about bullying is when it happens to kids that are lower functioning. If you experience relatively normative development, you know who is a jerk and who to not trust. Kids with developmental delays can be so trusting and so innocent. Really breaks my heart when stuff like this happens as I've seen it too much with kids with FASD and really horrific outcomes. 

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3 hours ago, Robert Long said:

This is a no-win story. 

 

But I don't know that we really want to live in a society that can't allow a 14 year old to learn from a mistake.

To use a similar double negative >> I don't disagree!

 

It is also more than fair that Isaiah Meyer-Crothers has a right to tell his story.  I think it is awesome he stepped forward. I also suspect the attention will afford him a platform.  To get help?  Even opportunity in an environment where people understand his development needs.  Maybe even, likely, any depression, anxiety he deals with. Generous people surface just like the Mitch Millers do when no one is looking.  

 

 

It will either improve Mitch's learning curve. Help hold him to account for his behaviors and attitude.

 

Or not.  Maybe he will even be generous himself? 

 

His leash will be a lot shorter. That much is fair.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Canuck Surfer said:

To use a similar double negative >> I don't disagree!

 

It is also more than fair that Isaiah Meyer-Crothers has a right to tell his story.  I think it is awesome he stepped forward. I also suspect the attention will afford him a platform.  To get help?  Even opportunity in an environment where people understand his development needs.  Maybe even, likely, any depression, anxiety he deals with. Generous people surface just like the Mitch Millers do when no one is looking.  

 

 

It will either improve Mitch's learning curve. Help hold him to account for his behaviors and attitude.

 

Or not.  Maybe he will even be generous himself? 

 

His leash will be a lot shorter. That much is fair.

 

 

for sure its good this kid told his story. In fact it might be the thing that helps Miller. 

 

My concern here is breaking the cycle of this kind of thing, Miller either picked it up somewhere or maybe he's a sociopath. But if he's just a kid with bad parents .e.g, I hope he gets what he needs to stop being an abuser. 

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