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13 hours ago, 6of1_halfdozenofother said:

 

 

 

 

Of course, we conveniently forget that the Convention Centre already has hospital capacity set aside since the beginning of the pandemic for exactly this purpose...

 

https://www.vancouverconventioncentre.com/news/alternate-care-site-update

 

https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/vancouver-convention-centre-to-remain-an-empty-hospital-for-foreseeable-future

 

:emot-parrot:

you're forgetting about staff and equipment. Small details I know. 

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6 hours ago, 6of1_halfdozenofother said:

For someone who complains about how kos is "spamming" the thread, you're not really doing that much better by repeating your phrase over and over for each of kos' posts...

 

....at least kos is providing legitimate counter-points to the lovefest that Bonnie is getting, and pointing out holes in the logic that she and the government are touting.  Yours is just unadulterated spam.

He’s dodging the question, it is a legitimate question he continuously ignores. 

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https://www.msn.com/en-ca/health/medical/death-of-manitoban-boy-under-10-a-rare-but-sad-reminder-of-reality-of-covid-19-expert-says/ar-BB1buz6i?ocid=msedgdhp

It's rare for children to have such severe cases of COVID-19, but the death of a boy under 10 announced on Saturday is another reminder to take the pandemic seriously, an emerging virus researcher says.

The boy is the youngest person in Manitoba to die from the illness to date.

"This is a very sad reminder of the reality of the situation that we're in," said Jason Kindrachuk, an assistant professor and Canada research chair in emerging viruses at the University of Manitoba.

"This is something we have to continue to take very seriously and we cannot lose sight of at this point in time."

Unlike the flu, which tends to have severe outcomes among the young and the elderly, children rarely die or get very ill after contracting COVID-19, which can provide some solace to parents, Kindrachuk said.

"But when we do see that these events take place, it's an even more tragic reminder of where we are in this pandemic. Unfortunately, we still have difficulty in trying to protect all those around us," he said.

Although the death of a child is tragic, Kindrachuk doesn't think it will prompt skeptics to start taking public health orders more seriously.

"I don't think this is going to be the point that changes things, but I hope that for those of us that are trying to find a way through this, that maybe it provides us, again, with with the perspective that this is something we have to continue to take very seriously and that we cannot lose sight of at this point in time."

'Some light'

Manitoba reported 487 new cases and 10 deaths on Saturday, and 365 new cases and 11 deaths on Sunday.

There was also a record 336 people in hospital with COVID-19, up from 327 on Saturday. Of those, 44 are in intensive care, a news release said on Sunday.

The numbers are "concerning," Kindrachuk said, and signal that public health restrictions may need to be in place longer before case numbers and hospitalizations stabilize.

"The trouble for Manitoba as a whole is that the test positivity rate was extremely high and there was a lot of community transmission, so is there going to be enough change within that two to four week period to see a really great or substantial effect?"

"It may actually take longer."

However, there is some good news, he said.

The test positivity rate appears to be stabilizing. The five-day test positivity rate was 13.3 per cent on Sunday, its lowest since it first reached 13 per cent on Nov. 16. It was at a record 14.8 per cent on Nov. 26.

"We're seeing at least some indications with some of the data that perhaps there is some some light at the end of the tunnel," Kindrachuk said.

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1 hour ago, canuck73_3 said:

He’s dodging the question, it is a legitimate question he continuously ignores. 

I never realized  it was mandatory to answer questions from other posters here on this site... 

Learn something new everyday... LOL.....

Edited by kingofsurrey
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Ryan Imgrund @imgrun · 1h
 
In Ontario, there are 13,338 active cases of COVID. This is 0.09% of the our population.
 
At a school in the @TDSB, 4.3% of the population has an active case. This is 48 TIMES the number of active cases, per capita. Tell me again schools don’t drive community transmission.
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28 minutes ago, kingofsurrey said:
Ryan Imgrund @imgrun · 1h
 
In Ontario, there are 13,338 active cases of COVID. This is 0.09% of the our population.
 
At a school in the @TDSB, 4.3% of the population has an active case. This is 48 TIMES the number of active cases, per capita. Tell me again schools don’t drive community transmission.

Perhaps schools don't drive community transmission, but rather the community drives school transmissions.

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10 minutes ago, gurn said:

Perhaps schools don't drive community transmission, but rather the community drives school transmissions.

hmm.... why would one school be 48 times the general infection level.... that makes no sense.. sorry. 

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37 minutes ago, kingofsurrey said:

hmm.... why would one school be 48 times the general infection level.... that makes no sense.. sorry. 

Why does almost every one in one electoral district vote for party A while people living a block away vote for party B?

 

Geography perhaps? different income and education levels perhaps?

 

The kids in that school may mostly be living in apartment complexes, with much more contact  with other people than the kids living in single family houses.

Edited by gurn
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3 minutes ago, gurn said:

Why does almost every one in one electoral district vote for party A while people living a block away vote for party B?

 

Geography perhaps? different income and education levels perhaps?

 

The kids in that school may mostly be living in apartment complexes, with much more contact  with other people than the kids living in single family houses.

I do appreciate your discussion and i do get you point.  I just think there is no way a school should have 48 times the infection of the general population.

That can not be logically explained by suggesting their neighbourhood has a high infection rate....       I don't hear of any neighbourhood or cities with a rate 48 times the provincial average.......  

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4 minutes ago, gurn said:

Why does almost every one in one electoral district vote for party A while people living a block away vote for party B?

 

Geography perhaps? different income and education levels perhaps?

 

The kids in that school may mostly be living in apartment complexes, with much more contact  with other people than the kids living in single family houses.

From the last paragraph of the article it sounds like you are correct, the rate is actually lower than the surrounding community.. fwiw

 

“I know news of these additional cases will, understandably, be worrisome for families,” Principal Jeff Crane said in the letter.

 

“Since COVID-19 continues to spread in the community, finding additional cases in schools from broad testing is not unexpected at this time.”

 

Crane noted in the letter that the positivity rate within the school is at 4 per cent, which is lower than the 16 per cent positivity rate within the surrounding community.

 

“This means that there is currently a higher percentage of people who test positive for COVID-19 in the community compared to in this school setting,” he said.

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1 minute ago, Chicken. said:

From the last paragraph of the article it sounds like you are correct, the rate is actually lower than the surrounding community.. fwiw

 

“I know news of these additional cases will, understandably, be worrisome for families,” Principal Jeff Crane said in the letter.

 

“Since COVID-19 continues to spread in the community, finding additional cases in schools from broad testing is not unexpected at this time.”

 

Crane noted in the letter that the positivity rate within the school is at 4 per cent, which is lower than the 16 per cent positivity rate within the surrounding community.

 

“This means that there is currently a higher percentage of people who test positive for COVID-19 in the community compared to in this school setting,” he said.

Comparing the positive rate of kids in the school with adults in the community is not really a valid comparison is it ?

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Just now, kingofsurrey said:

Comparing the positive rate of kids in the school with adults in the community is not really a valid comparison is it ?

They are all humans living in the same geographical area, no?   

 

You were saying there is no way that a school should have X % amount of higher infection compared to gen pop, and you are right, the infection rate is lower than the gen pop in the surrounding area. 

 

My question is how in the world is the surrounding community at 16% positivity rate...  nearly 1 in 5

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4 minutes ago, Chicken. said:

They are all humans living in the same geographical area, no?   

 

You were saying there is no way that a school should have X % amount of higher infection compared to gen pop, and you are right, the infection rate is lower than the gen pop in the surrounding area. 

 

My question is how in the world is the surrounding community at 16% positivity rate...  nearly 1 in 5

Yah, that kind of infection rate is frightening.....  basically 20% of the people around town are infected.......

At that point i would think the government should code red that area... total quarentine for 14 days.  Everyone only allowed to grocery / pharmacy and liquor store. 

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Just watched the Moderna Chief Medical officer on BNN.

 

From the sounds of it they will do major domestic rollout of the vaccine in US, starting with 20 million doses in December.  He says that the US invested billions in domestic production and as a result will get the bulk of the initial rollout.

 

Also, from the sounds of it, Moderna Vaccine production for the rest of the world will ramp up in January - the factory is in Switzerland.  If I were to guess from the way he was describing it, our priority populations will see the first  Moderna vaccine near end of January.  Not sure if this coincides with Pfizer and Astra time lines.

 

Now comes the debate.  Which population group is priority?   If it were up to me, it be elderly, people with compromised immune systems, and medical workers.  I would also put teachers and the emergency responders who deal with the public right after those groups.

 

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3 hours ago, Chicken. said:

From the last paragraph of the article it sounds like you are correct, the rate is actually lower than the surrounding community.. fwiw

 

“I know news of these additional cases will, understandably, be worrisome for families,” Principal Jeff Crane said in the letter.

 

“Since COVID-19 continues to spread in the community, finding additional cases in schools from broad testing is not unexpected at this time.”

 

Crane noted in the letter that the positivity rate within the school is at 4 per cent, which is lower than the 16 per cent positivity rate within the surrounding community.

 

“This means that there is currently a higher percentage of people who test positive for COVID-19 in the community compared to in this school setting,” he said.

When it comes to schools I'm not entirely convinced they are being transparent.  My daughter has worked in schools that have had cases that were never made public andf there's a very different set of standards for schools compared to everywhere else

 

edit: aren't being transparent

Edited by stawns
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Just now, stawns said:

When it comes to schools I'm not entirely convinced they are being transparent.  My daughter has worked in schools that have had cases that were never made public andf there's a very different set of standards for schools compared to everywhere else

I completely agree... that was just about an isolated case where they happened to test an entire school and look what happened

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55 minutes ago, stawns said:

When it comes to schools I'm not entirely convinced they are being transparent.  My daughter has worked in schools that have had cases that were never made public andf there's a very different set of standards for schools compared to everywhere else

There’s been schools in my district with positive cases that never made it to any exposure list. Even administration is sometimes unaware. It’s frustrating when parent conversation is the only source of knowledge regarding positive tests and exposures. 

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8 minutes ago, GSP* said:

There’s been schools in my district with positive cases that never made it to any exposure list. Even administration is sometimes unaware. It’s frustrating when parent conversation is the only source of knowledge regarding positive tests and exposures. 

I'll give Interior Health credit, there were on it and had their investigation concluded by yesterday afternoon.  Though we still don't know who it is

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2 hours ago, Chicken. said:

They are all humans living in the same geographical area, no?   

 

You were saying there is no way that a school should have X % amount of higher infection compared to gen pop, and you are right, the infection rate is lower than the gen pop in the surrounding area. 

 

My question is how in the world is the surrounding community at 16% positivity rate...  nearly 1 in 5

Selective testing, most likely.  If they were to do a truly randomized test of the population in that area, the rate is likely to be lower - or at least that's what I would expect to see.  I think much like earlier on in the pandemic, they're only testing "likely" cases in an interest to confirm, as opposed to doing testing of the general populace (which is what the school test is more akin to).

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