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4 hours ago, Alflives said:

Point?

if antivaxxer weren’t such selfish idiots then we would have vaccine available for everyone.

The point is:  given that there are still billions of people in the world who haven't had any vaccine shot and want one, why was it so hard for Canada to donate these unused shots and, instead, having to throw them out?  That seems odd.

 

(I don't know what antivaxxers have to do with this.  If someone in Canada doesn't want a vaccine shot, fine, give their shot to someone in the Third World who does want it.)

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23 minutes ago, UnkNuk said:

The point is:  given that there are still billions of people in the world who haven't had any vaccine shot and want one, why was it so hard for Canada to donate these unused shots and, instead, having to throw them out?  That seems odd.

 

(I don't know what antivaxxers have to do with this.  If someone in Canada doesn't want a vaccine shot, fine, give their shot to someone in the Third World who does want it.)

There are some places that have similar hesitancy to the vaccines.   There is also the lack of infrastructure in some regions.  These two reasons are why you have low vaccination rates in developing nations.   

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9 minutes ago, thedestroyerofworlds said:

There are some places that have similar hesitancy to the vaccines.   There is also the lack of infrastructure in some regions.  These two reasons are why you have low vaccination rates in developing nations.   

But I seem to recall that Canada and other industrialized nations came in for criticism from developing nations for giving their citizens second doses of the vaccines when the developing nations had none.

 

I don't know if Canada lost the ball on this one or if we did the best we could and just couldn't find any takers for some weird reason.  It's one of those stories that seem to get mentioned in passing that probably deserves a bit more attention.  We threw out 13.6 million doses of Astra-Zeneca and 1.2 million doses of Moderna!  For that matter, how much did the government pay for those doses?

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On 7/1/2022 at 5:09 PM, Alflives said:

Tell your dad he’s being both foolish and selfish (unless he has a medical excuse, of course) for being unvaccinated.  

No, my dad's a grown man and can make his own decisions. He doesn't get the flu shot either. 

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31 minutes ago, BearHugs said:

No, my dad's a grown man and can make his own decisions. He doesn't get the flu shot either. 

Your dad may be chronologically a man, but refusing these vaccines (which are free and abundant here) is childish, selfish and foolish.  But I’m guessing that’s why you’re posting here, right?  To stir the pot?  

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3 hours ago, Alflives said:

Your dad may be chronologically a man, but refusing these vaccines (which are free and abundant here) is childish, selfish and foolish.  But I’m guessing that’s why you’re posting here, right?  To stir the pot?  

5 posts so far and 2 of them in this thread.  Here's the pot:

b1b6b55380b4970b5b356cedbad79b22c0dc76e5.jpeg

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  • -SN- unpinned this topic

The correct decision. Ruling in her favour would open a pandoras box of issues. 

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/covid-19-vaccine-transplant-charter-rights-1.6518642

 

 

Charter not violated in denying transplant to patient who refused COVID-19 vaccine, court rules

 

Woman was diagnosed in 2018 with a chronic, progressive disease

 

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On 7/5/2022 at 8:44 PM, UnkNuk said:

The point is:  given that there are still billions of people in the world who haven't had any vaccine shot and want one, why was it so hard for Canada to donate these unused shots and, instead, having to throw them out?  That seems odd.

 

(I don't know what antivaxxers have to do with this.  If someone in Canada doesn't want a vaccine shot, fine, give their shot to someone in the Third World who does want it.)

 

On 7/5/2022 at 9:30 PM, UnkNuk said:

But I seem to recall that Canada and other industrialized nations came in for criticism from developing nations for giving their citizens second doses of the vaccines when the developing nations had none.

 

I don't know if Canada lost the ball on this one or if we did the best we could and just couldn't find any takers for some weird reason.  It's one of those stories that seem to get mentioned in passing that probably deserves a bit more attention.  We threw out 13.6 million doses of Astra-Zeneca and 1.2 million doses of Moderna!  For that matter, how much did the government pay for those doses?


Throwing out usable vaccines is a travesty that should never happen in our modern world. I also don’t know what specifically Canada did or did not do in trying to find takers for the vaccine. That said in order for vaccines to get administered properly there has to be the infrastructure in place to deliver them where they need to go in a timely matter otherwise we’re basically just giving garbage to other countries.
 

This is purely speculation on my part, but the vast majority of country’s populations that are still unvaccinated are very poor so I wouldn’t be surprised if they lacked the proper facilities/doctors/infrastructure necessary to deliver these vaccines to the people who want them. Or for the people who want them to get to a facility that has them. Unfortunately it’s not as simple as just shipping them the doses.

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On 7/8/2022 at 4:19 PM, Alflives said:

Your dad may be chronologically a man, but refusing these vaccines (which are free and abundant here) is childish, selfish and foolish.  But I’m guessing that’s why you’re posting here, right?  To stir the pot?  

Looking at this post and some of your previous posts calling people selfish and childish ….ect , wouldn’t that be stirring the pot ? 

Edited by Bertburelinden
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I just got my first case of CoViD while I’m in Florida right now. I’m triple vaxxed, and it has been manageable.. kind of like a flu for a few days. I seem to be on the up and up now. Stay safe all. 

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Quote

Called out for wearing a mask? You're not alone. What may be driving this kind of pandemic aggression

Experts say crticism could discourage some from wearing masks as an infectious subvariant takes hold

Jason Vermes · CBC Radio · Posted: Jul 16, 2022 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: July 16
 
translink-mandatory-masks.jpg
As masking moves from being a requirement to a recommendation, some people say they're facing criticism for wearing a mask. (Ben Nelms/CBC)

 

At her job as a pharmacy assistant, Rebecca Stribbell has heard plenty of comments about wearing a mask behind the counter. 

 

Even though mask mandates have been lifted in much of the country, she says provincial requirements for health workers — and her own preferences — keep her covering up. 

Her pharmacy processes COVID-19 tests and she says some symptomatic patients visit the store without a face covering. Stribbell says she also wears a mask to protect others from becoming ill.

 

But negative comments run the gamut, from suggestions that the Langley, B.C., student is upset with B.C. Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry or her boss for imposing mask rules, to questions about why she's wearing a mask if they've taken down plexiglass barriers at the cash register. Stribbell says she tries to de-escalate situations by brushing the comments off as jokes.

 

"It makes it hard at work because you have to keep the sense of professionalism," Stribbell told CBC Radio's White Coat, Black Art. "You know they're not joking, but you can't say anything because you're at work."

 

 
A person wearing a mask poses for a selfie while standing on a balcony
Rebecca Stribbell is a student and pharmacy assistant in Langley, B.C. She says she's faced critical comments and stares while wearing a mask in public. (Submitted by Rebecca Stribbell)

 

As masking in public places shifts from being a requirement to a recommendation, experts say an uptick in negative comments directed toward those wearing face coverings may be part of a larger trend of increased aggression — such as air rage and domestic violence — during the pandemic.

 

They also warn that it could discourage people from wearing masks at the same time the more infectious BA.5 subvariant is becoming dominant in Canada.

 

"I suspect that some of these bullies, some of these individuals who harass people, are telling themselves that they have the true knowledge, that they know that masks are not necessary," said Dr. Steven Taylor, a professor of psychiatry at the University of British Columbia.

 

"They might tell themselves, 'Oh, I'm just educating someone.' But they're doing it in such an aggressive fashion. It's not just good-natured education; it seems to have a malicious intent."

 

LISTEN | White Coat, Black Art speaks with experts about what's behind mask criticism: 
 
wcba_16x9.jpg
White Coat Black Art26:31Mask Harassment

'No one wants to be told that they're sheep'

 

Though the comments at her workplace have been "inquisitive" rather than mean-spirited, Stribbell says the criticism she faces in public is harsher — "almost degrading" — especially when she's out and about with her boyfriend, who is of Taiwanese descent. 

 

She says she has noticed people commenting about them under their breath, staring and even pointing.

 

"It makes you question whether you should continue wearing a mask," she said. "If I'm getting this comment every time I go outside, is it worth it?"

 

"No one wants to be told that they're sheep."

 

 
ttc-mandatory-masks.jpg
Many transit agencies, including the Toronto Transit Commission, pictured, have removed mandatory mask requirements. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

 

Unlike vaccinations, masks are a very visible symbol of the COVID-19 pandemic. Their use is also more common in Asian countries where they're worn to protect against respiratory viruses, from the cold to COVID-19, potentially indicating mask-related harassment is motivated by racism, Taylor said. 

 

Opposition to face coverings is nothing new, despite more visible and outspoken criticism floating around social media networks.

 

During the 1918 influenza pandemic, a protest movement known as the Anti-Mask League formed in San Francisco, Calif., in response to government mandates requiring citizens to mask up.

 

When those mandates were dropped, it was almost like a "carnival atmosphere," according to news reports at the time, Taylor said.

 

But like today, some continued to mask up — and Taylor says there were reports of harassment then, too.

 

"In one episode, a man was walking down the street, going to work, wearing his mask, and you had a gang of these young youths behind him chanting, 'Take off your mask,'" he said.

 

Societies eventually land on what is acceptable behaviour. Some of that gets legislated and some of it just gets accepted.- Dr. Andrew Morris, infectious diseases physician

 

Psychological reactance

 

While research on mask-related harassment is lacking, Taylor says something called psychological reactance could be at play. It's the idea that someone has an "allergic reaction" of sorts to taking direction from others.

 

"People come up to them and say, 'You need to put on a mask.' They react by getting angry and saying, 'You're not the boss of me,'" said Taylor.

 

"Those individuals have … felt pushed around for a year or more by having to wear masks. And then suddenly the mandates are lifted and perhaps some of those individuals are wanting to vent their frustration."

 

In a survey of more than 2,000 people conducted by Taylor, 16 per cent reported not wearing a mask. That group tended to score higher on metrics related to negative attitudes toward masking, according to the study.

 

WATCH | Experts in some provinces say a seventh COVID-19 wave has begun: 
 
LEE_SHANOK_COVID_UPDATE_MPX__113872.jpg?
 

Summer COVID-19 wave sparks concern

5 days ago
Duration2:02
Rising cases have prompted some provinces to declare a seventh wave of COVID-19, which is sparking concern for many health-care workers.

 

 

Dr. Andrew Morris, an infectious diseases physician at Sinai Health and University Health Network in Toronto, says he continues to wear a KN95, or sometimes an N95, while in crowded indoor spaces. 

 

On a recent trip to New Orleans, he says he and his family were criticized for that decision.

"There were a few snide comments — under the breath, but audible comments — you know, commenting on the fact that we were wearing masks and we were paranoid," he recalled.

Experts recommend masking in crowded spaces

 

That kind of criticism could have two effects on those who choose to mask, Morris warns.

 

They may begin to avoid spaces where they believe they run the risk of being harassed for the decision. Others, feeling shamed by others, may choose to forego masks.

 

"Even stares, I guess for some people, whether that's true or just perceived, you know, can be a kind of shaming," said Morris.

 

Public health campaigns could help reduce the stigma. One public service announcement from the government of Ireland makes the point that continuing to wear a mask in public reduces the risk to vulnerable communities, such as those with pre-existing health conditions or who are pregnant.

 

 

Morris applauded the ad's messaging but said after two years of public health restrictions, Canadians may not yet be ready for such an approach.

 

"I'm certainly no psychologist, but I think you would find that the behavioural experts will say that you need readied ears to take in that kind of messaging," he said.

 

That could change in the coming weeks or months, however.

As a seventh COVID-19 wave, fuelled by the BA.5 subvariant, takes hold in Canada, Morris says he expects case numbers will soon rise. 

 

Whether that will change a perceived increase in aggression toward those who wear masks remains to be seen.

 

"Societies eventually land on what is acceptable behavior. Some of that gets legislated and some of it just gets accepted," Morris said.

 

Meanwhile, the physician says if you're in a poorly ventilated space with a lot of people, you should still wear a mask.

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/whitecoat/mask-harrassment-covid-pandemic-1.6519600

 

 

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A close friends entire family got covid a couple weeks ago including his dad that has some health issues.

 

His dad has been very nervous of the virus and has done everything he could and should do to stay healthy.

The entire family is fully vaxxed an boosted.

 

The dad is in the hospital right now. They don't know if he will make it. 

 

It's still out there folks.

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After three years of avoiding it my wife got it 2 days before we were to fly to Vancouver. She is very, very active and healthy. 
‘In bed for 5 days and weeks of lingering cough and episodes of unprovoked tachycardia. 
She is a shell of her regular self. 
Somehow I avoided it as did everyone else in the house and had a wonderful trip too Vancouver without her unfortunately. 
It is still out there and probably at as high a level as ever and September/October may be the worst yet. 

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There was an interesting piece on The Conversation about corporate social responsibility needing to substitute for government inaction.  To be honest, if the government throws in the towel, it's usually because they feel their political careers may be threatened by vocal opposition; it's not very likely that many corporations will take up the mantle for the very same reason.  You might get the odd one or two companies (or perhaps one or two sectors) but they'll probably be the first to beat the retreat drum, given they were the loudest in asking the government to repeal health measures.

 

Realistically though, the responsibility should still be with government, and their decision towards inaction or at least an unwillingness to put in more stringent health & safety reegulations while we're still in this pandemic for the greater good is a dereliction of duty by any measure.  And I'm not just referring to our provincial government.

 

An excerpt from the article:

Quote

By any objective measure, it is not the pandemic that is over, but rather government efforts to minimize the human toll of the pandemic. With governments seemingly giving up their responsibility to keep people safe, it it time for businesses to take the lead on health and safety.

https://theconversation.com/businesses-have-the-responsibility-to-invest-in-health-and-safety-when-governments-fail-to-187136

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