Jump to content
The Official Site of the Vancouver Canucks
Canucks Community

Blackhawks player from 2010 championship team suing team for sexual assault by coach

Rate this topic


Recommended Posts

8 minutes ago, Fanuck said:

As expected,  this is only going to get worse for the Hawks,  every day that goes by with them denying allegations and/or remaining silent I lose even more respect for them  - and I barely had any to begin with. 

 

https://www.tsn.ca/former-coach-confirms-blackhawks-management-met-to-discuss-alleged-abuse-1.1660541

This is so bad.  What can the league do to punish the Hawks for covering this up?  Something has to be done, doesn’t it?  

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Alflives said:

This is so bad.  What can the league do to punish the Hawks for covering this up?  Something has to be done, doesn’t it?  

Good question,  what will the league do?  I suspect those cowards will hide behind the old "we don't comment on active legal cases" and hope that this falls from the headlines.  Because you know,  old boys protect their own.

 

What they should do is ban everyone in coaching/management who were complicit with this cover up from hockey indefinitely and strip the Hawks next 10 first round picks to send a loud and clear message.   

 

Because there isn't precedent for this kind of thing you have to look for other comparable types of conduct violation.   Voyonov was essentially banned indefinitely for his actions so start there.

Edited by Fanuck
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

"“Every guy on the team knew about it,” one player on the 2010 team told The Athletic. “Every single guy on the team knew.”"

 

My immediate question to the unnamed player- what did you do with this information?

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, gurn said:

"“Every guy on the team knew about it,” one player on the 2010 team told The Athletic. “Every single guy on the team knew.”"

 

My immediate question to the unnamed player- what did you do with this information?

I feel so bad for the victims, and I am hoping they will at least get some answers and hopefully later on, justice and some needed change. From what has been reported, this should have been an easy decision on the Blackhawks management part. 
The players need to respond to your valid question. But to speculate a probable answer, I think the coach left the team after the championship? If the players then lost track of the whereabouts of the coach, then maybe the players thought that he was fired? Or if they somehow knew that the management did nothing about it, then maybe they were thinking that management tried their best to investigate and either couldn't find enough proof or found that it was some sort of misunderstanding (e.g., it was consensual), etc.? 

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/17/2021 at 11:59 AM, PhillipBlunt said:

Ok. Still, if the pervert approaches the player, that player can physically repel the pervert and then subsequently inform his teammates of the issue. 

That requires having a plan in place.

 

Assaults often catch victims off guard...so much so, that they are in momentary shock as they process "is this really happening?".  You're asking for a reaction that's taken out of context of that moment.  You don't know how you'd react...everyone has this picture in their minds of bravado and courage but the first reaction is to freeze. 

 

A lot can happen to you in that state as you're numb and trying to figure out in very much a wth way.

 

You don't expect something like this to happen so, when it does, all reactions are a little skewed.  It's easier to say you'd do something as an observer.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1
  • Vintage 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/24/2021 at 1:11 PM, sassbs said:

Because I went through something like this as a kid you ignorant F!@K!!   Don’t be a smart A$$ honesty.  
 

And as a kid I was scared to say anything to anyone.   As a grown fit man, I would smash a person face if they did that to me.   So to hear nhl players can be affected by this.   Especially by balding older video coaches.  
 

I get it can happen, but to me it’s hard to believe NHL players would stand for this.   These aren’t players trying to make a pee wee team here, they are signed to a multi year - multi million dollar athletes. 

 

of course it has happened.  Just shocked that’s all. 

No need to lash out here...

 

I'm so sorry that happened to you, but they aren't "standing for it" which is why we're discussing it.  

 

Not all humans are violent and physical....so factor in that not everyone would react as you would.  If you don't understand how being blacklisted is a factor, even with a big contract, that likely is something to consider.  How people of power and persuasion use that knowing that they have you in position of weakness (to some degree).  They can make and break you.  And some "react" knowing that their fate lies in this person's hands.

 

Especially if your entire future and career are at stake...you tread lightly and hope that the fact that others also know what's happening means it will be addressed.  That's where the biggest failure lies....in people turning a blind eye. There is a responsibility that employers have TO intervene when this becomes known to them. No one intervened and handed this guy his walking papers and that's a problem.  Shipping him out with a recommendation hardly fits that as it just tucks it in the closet and allows this person to get away with it.  This league has been one of "who you know" and that shouldn't offer protection from criminal activity.  I've got your back should always only apply within legal and moral boundaries.

 

Remember....he was guy one against this guy and his army of supporters.  There's shame and guilt involved (which this kind of 
"should have knocked him on his ass" thinking perpetuates).  We ask why the victim "didn't" do something but it's the perpetrator who we should be seeking those answers from.

 

 

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

IF abuse so was easy to stop, our generation would not have to deal with it; my great grandparents would have already have put a end to it.

  • Upvote 1
  • Vintage 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've said this here before but I feel I need to circle back to it:

 

We all need to stop these reactions of absolute confusion and disbelief when others don't act the way we believe we would in a certain situation. 

 

These types of reactions of disbelief put the onus on the victim for not acting a certain way that we expect them to and it presupposes that there is a 'certain way' that they should have reacted - this makes the victim feel even worse for not 'measuring up' to societies expectations. 

 

Victims do not need to hear how others would have beat the S#$! out of the perpetrator, that doesn't help them whatsoever. 

 

And I get it, people are simply stating a personal opinion on what they believe they would've done themselves in a situation,  but I'm telling you again that your personal opinion isn't doing anything to help said Victims.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2
  • Vintage 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Fanuck said:

I've said this here before but I feel I need to circle back to it:

 

We all need to stop these reactions of absolute confusion and disbelief when others don't act the way we believe we would in a certain situation. 

 

These types of reactions of disbelief put the onus on the victim for not acting a certain way that we expect them to and it presupposes that there is a 'certain way' that they should have reacted - this makes the victim feel even worse for not 'measuring up' to societies expectations. 

 

Victims do not need to hear how others would have beat the S#$! out of the perpetrator, that doesn't help them whatsoever. 

 

And I get it, people are simply stating a personal opinion on what they believe they would've done themselves in a situation,  but I'm telling you again that your personal opinion isn't doing anything to help said Victims.

Not only that (last part)...these people who talk a tough game, when put into this situation, may also freeze and be in a temporary state of shock that's momentarily debilitating too.  It's easy to "think out" the scenario but when you're there, in that room, it's something quite different to act on.  Playing it out in your mind is NOT experiencing it. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, -Vintage Canuck- said:

 

pretty weak PR move, but when you get caught shuffling off a problem like this I guess its your only move. 

 

The Hawks office got rid of a problem and callously let the creep go off and hurt more people, they need to just admit it and the NHL needs to take a stand on this, maybe bringing in a new enforcement policy of some kind to make sure there's a consequence for this kind of disregard for people. 

 

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Fanuck said:

I've said this here before but I feel I need to circle back to it:

 

We all need to stop these reactions of absolute confusion and disbelief when others don't act the way we believe we would in a certain situation. 

 

These types of reactions of disbelief put the onus on the victim for not acting a certain way that we expect them to and it presupposes that there is a 'certain way' that they should have reacted - this makes the victim feel even worse for not 'measuring up' to societies expectations. 

 

Victims do not need to hear how others would have beat the S#$! out of the perpetrator, that doesn't help them whatsoever. 

 

And I get it, people are simply stating a personal opinion on what they believe they would've done themselves in a situation,  but I'm telling you again that your personal opinion isn't doing anything to help said Victims.

CHI management made the cold decision to get rid of a problem, even giving the guy a reference for a new job. There's nowhere to hide on a move like this. The longer CHI delays taking full responsibility the more damage is done to the victims of this. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, -Vintage Canuck- said:

 

What a bunch of BS!

 

It is not an 'independent' investigation when the organization accused of the cover-up and collusion hires the investigator and pays them for their services.  I suspect that the Blackhawks legal team advised the owners to make this move and that they know many will interpret this as the Blackhawks give a $%#@ and that they are actually doing something about it.   

 

I know that the Blackhawks were aggressively pursuing the strategy in the courts that since the statue of limitations for this in the US had passed the issue should be dropped.  With the immense financial resources and political/legal connections of the Wirtz family I suspect the victims will never get the legal justice they seek.  I hold no optimism that the NHL - which is run by old white men - will do anything meaningful about these allegations when all is said an done either sadly. 

 

 

  • Vintage 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, -Vintage Canuck- said:

 

That's total garbage Gary, we all know exactly what your first reaction was - you asked legal what your exposure on this issue was and then you asked NHL PR to tell you what to say to the media.  You're so transparent it's pathetic. 

  • Hydration 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The problem with staying silent is you then allow that person to seek out other victims.

 

From my understanding the player went to his coach, the coach went to management, and management didn't act accordingly allowing someone else to be a victim.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/29/2021 at 10:16 AM, \/ijay said:

The problem with staying silent is you then allow that person to seek out other victims.

Victims of sexual abuse have to deal with enough as it is, they don't need people telling them that every subsequent act of abuse that these scumbags perpetrate is on them because they didn't come forward  -  this mentality is essentially another type of victim shaming which we don't need.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

A timeline of events here:

 

Quote

July 2008: Bradley Aldrich, 25, is hired to be the Chicago Blackhawks video coach. A graduate of Northern Michigan University, according to his resume, Aldrich had previously worked as a coordinator of hockey operations and video coach for the University of Notre Dame.

May 2010: A lawsuit filed in May 2021 by a former Blackhawks player, identified as John Doe 1, alleges that in May 2010, as the Blackhawks were a month away from winning the Stanley Cup, Bradley Aldrich sent him inappropriate text messages, turned on porn and masturbated in front of him, threatened him if he didn’t engage in sexual activity with him and sexually assaulted him.

The ex-Blackhawk player also contends in his complaint that when he disclosed the misconduct to a team mental skills coach, that coach said “the sexual assault was his fault, that he was culpable for what happened, made mistakes during his encounter with the perpetrator and permitted the sexual assault to occur.” The lawsuit alleges that the Blackhawks subsequently did nothing to Aldrich.

The player’s lawsuit stated that he “suppressed” memories of the alleged 2010 misconduct by Aldrich until July 2019.RECOMMENDS

 

June 2010: The Blackhawks win the Stanley Cup.

July 2010: Brad Aldrich leaves the Blackhawks, according to his resume included in his personnel file and his former LinkedIn page.

November 2010: Brad Aldrich begins working for the USA Hockey Women’s National Team, according to his resume.

September 2011: Brad Aldrich goes to work for the University of Notre Dame’s Compton Family Ice Arena as an Asst. Programming/Instruction Manager, according to his resume.

July 2012: Brad Aldrich is hired by Miami University to be Director of Hockey Operations.

October-November 2012: According to a Miami University Police Department investigative report, on Sept. 7, 2018, a former Miami University student told police that while he was a student at the school, Aldrich allegedly assaulted him. After a night of drinking with Aldrich, the former student said he went to his home and was startled awake by Aldrich, according to the report. Although some details were redacted from the report provided by FOIA to WBEZ, the former student said he shoved Aldrich off of him and walked home.

When interviewed by police in 2018, the former student said he did not want to press charges against the school or Aldrich, but wanted police to record what happened “in case he ever does something like this again, particularly to children.” Aldrich was not charged.

November 2012: Aldrich resigned from Miami University “under suspicion of unwanted touching of an adult male,” according to a Houghton, Mich., police investigative report.

In an email to WBEZ, the university said this second alleged victim was separate from the allegation detailed in the 2018 police report. This one allegedly involved an “off-campus sexual assault involving a non-student adult and Brad Aldrich,” Miami University wrote. Miami University said its police department reached out to the alleged victim, but the individual declined to make a report.

March 2013: Brad Aldrich is working as a volunteer hockey coach for a high school team in Houghton, Mich.

A teen from the team alleged to police that Aldrich sexually assaulted him at a party after a hockey game, according to an investigative report later taken by police. In an interview with police, Aldrich admitted he committed sexual acts against the teen and knew it was wrong because he was his coach.

September-October 2013: Houghton, Mich., police investigate the March incident and several other allegations against Brad Aldrich, according to an investigative report.

In one allegation, a teen told police that when he was 16, Aldrich picked him up at a county fair in Houghton and had sexual contact with him, after which he was “uncomfortable with the situation.” Another allegation stemmed from an incident in September 2013, when Aldrich allegedly put his hands down the pants of a girl in front of him at Aldrich’s home and inappropriately touched her, according to the report. Another person alleged Aldrich committed unwanted sexual contact with him in 2012, climbing on him and touching him inappropriately as he told him to stop, the report stated.

Oct. 2, 2013: Houghton County prosecutors charged Brad Aldrich, 30, with a felony for the assault against the teen in March. Aldrich later pleaded guilty to misdemeanor sexual conduct involving a student and was placed on the Michigan sex offender registry. None of the other allegations detailed in the Houghton police report resulted in criminal charges.

September 2018: Miami University police investigated Aldrich when a former student raised allegations that stemmed from 2012. The investigation ended without police interviewing Aldrich or charging him, according to public documents obtained by WBEZ. Miami University police indicated in a report it would forward the case to local police. But the Oxford Police Department and county prosecutors’ office have no record of a complaint against Aldrich. The university’s Title IX office similarly opened an investigation but closed it without action, noting Aldrich no longer worked at the university and the alleged victim did not return messages.

May 2021: The former Blackhawks player filed a civil lawsuit against the team for failure to take any action when he says he raised sexual assault allegations in 2010. A second lawsuit is filed by John Doe 2, the former teen who Aldrich was convicted of assaulting, accusing the Blackhawks of inaction in its investigation of the 2010 allegations by the former player.

June 2021: The Blackhawks launch their own internal investigation into the allegations, hiring Chicago lawyer Reid Schar, a prominent former federal prosecutor, to lead it. Miami University also announces it has opened an internal investigation, hiring a law firm to review what happened during Aldrich’s employment.

https://www.wbez.org/stories/allegations-involving-ex-chicago-blackhawks-coach-brad-aldrich/5fa36b33-dd09-4d04-9a3e-73da29843519

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/29/2021 at 10:16 AM, \/ijay said:

The problem with staying silent is you then allow that person to seek out other victims.

 

From my understanding the player went to his coach, the coach went to management, and management didn't act accordingly allowing someone else to be a victim.

 

On 7/6/2021 at 11:36 AM, Fanuck said:

Victims of sexual abuse have to deal with enough as it is, they don't need people telling them that every subsequent act of abuse that these scumbags perpetrate is on them because they didn't come forward  -  this mentality is essentially another type of victim shaming which we don't need.  

The fault lies  with the perpatrator/offender.

 victim blaming is pathetic.

The people the victim told, that did nothing, were completely wrong, however with out the offender doing illegal things there would be nothing to tell the authorities.

Simple terms:

nobody should need a lock on their door or car, because people committ an illegal act by opening those doors with out permission.

The thief is the problem, not the unlocked door.

  • Vintage 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...