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Thousands dead in unmarked graves from Canadian Residential Schools


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4 hours ago, Ghostsof1915 said:

Doesn't mean we can't make steps to try and stop it from happening again. 

Of course it doesn't.

 

We should do our utmost to make sure this does not happen again.

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This is extremely disappointing....<_<

 

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/sign-left-on-saskatchewan-first-nation-a-crime-of-hate-rcmp-investigating/ar-AAMagU3?li=AAggNb9

 

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RCMP are investigating after a racist incident on Muskoday First Nation Wednesday morning, close to Prince Albert.

A sign reading “White lives matter too” was left on the Muskoday bridge between 9 and 9:45 a.m., according to RCMP.

The sign has an offensive message, including stereotypes about Indigenous people. A pair of shoes were also placed with the sign, a symbol used recently to represent the unmarked graves found at residential schools in B.C. and Saskatchewan.

The First Nation displayed shoes on that bridge for Indigenous People's Day on June 26.

Muskoday First Nation's chief said she considers this a hate crime during a press conference Wednesday afternoon.

“I don't know if technically and legally that's what it is, but to me, it's a crime of hate … Ignorance plays a key role in the situation that happened here today,” Chief Ava Bear said.

“It's disgusting that this individual, this male, would hang these shoes.

 

For those that didn't click on the link, there was an additional message that was really offensive. Just below the "White lives matter too" it said, "Who else is gonna work and pay taxes so you can sit on your a$$"....

 

More in the link, including a photo of the sign....
 

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1 hour ago, RUPERTKBD said:

This is extremely disappointing....<_<

 

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/sign-left-on-saskatchewan-first-nation-a-crime-of-hate-rcmp-investigating/ar-AAMagU3?li=AAggNb9

 

For those that didn't click on the link, there was an additional message that was really offensive. Just below the "White lives matter too" it said, "Who else is gonna work and pay taxes so you can sit on your a$$"....

 

More in the link, including a photo of the sign....
 

being from SK this doesn't surprise me in the least. 

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11 hours ago, Jimmy McGill said:

being from SK this doesn't surprise me in the least. 

Yeah, hard to believe that a classy place like PA would have someone like this living there....:rolleyes:

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1 minute ago, RUPERTKBD said:

Yeah, hard to believe that a classy place like PA would have someone like this living there....:rolleyes:

tbh its everywhere not just up there. When I left, I'd say that would have been the majority opinion on First Nations people, its just most people wouldn't have spray painted it on something. 

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1 hour ago, Jimmy McGill said:

tbh its everywhere not just up there. When I left, I'd say that would have been the majority opinion on First Nations people, its just most people wouldn't have spray painted it on something. 

It's been about 30 years since I've been there, but I've been almost everywhere in the Province and unfortunately, I'd have to concur...

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  • 2 weeks later...

Seems some of the money, that was supposed to go to Residential School survivors ended up elsewhere.    Not a surprise, really.

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/millions-meant-for-residential-school-survivors-spent-on-catholic-church-lawyers-administration-documents/ar-AAMGZNN?ocid=msedgdhp&pc=U531

The Roman Catholic Church spent millions of dollars that were supposed to go to residential school survivors on lawyers, administration, a private fundraising company and unapproved loans, according to documents obtained by CBC News.

The documents include a host of other revelations. They appear to contradict the Catholic Church's public claims about money paid to survivors.

"There are also a large number of serious accounting discrepancies that are alarming to Canada," states one document, a 53-page federal government "factum" summarizing the evidence in a 2015 court matter.

None of the other churches involved in the landmark Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement of 2005 — Anglican, United and Presbyterian — engaged in any of these practices. They all paid the full amounts agreed to years ago without incident.

The Catholic Church never ended up having to legally justify its activity. On the eve of the 2015 hearing on the matter, Saskatchewan Court of Queen's Bench Justice Neil Gabrielson approved the church's controversial buyout proposal, and the case was closed.

Advocates for survivors say they're disgusted and that the Catholic Church must be held accountable.

"This is unbelievably, absolutely gross. It's completely wrong," said Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, a former Saskatchewan provincial court judge and director of the University of British Columbia's Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre in Vancouver. She reviewed the documents at CBC's request.

"How could anyone do something like this?"

None of the lawyers involved in the 2015 case could be reached for comment on Wednesday.

The Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB) declined an interview request. An official noted the CCCB was not a party to the settlement. Individual dioceses and orders created a corporation to oversee the deal.

However, the official said Canada's bishops "are committed to continue engaging and listening." She noted the "historic delegation" travelling this December to the Vatican.

That delegation plans to ask Pope Francis to visit Canada and issue a residential schools apology, a call first made several years ago by Indigenous leaders, some bishops and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

Document lays out where church claims money went

The factum and other documents obtained by CBC News formed part of the court record in the 2015 case involving the federal government and the Catholic Church. A source directly involved in the case verified their authenticity. CBC News is not naming the source because they fear repercussions.

The opening paragraph of the factum states that the Catholic Church "has breached its obligations in the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement."

Aside from a failed $25-million fundraising campaign, the church was required to pay $29 million in cash with strict criteria for its use. The church was also allowed to meet its final $25-million commitment with "in-kind services."

The factum, written by federal lawyers Alexander Gay and Anne McConville, listed the following expenses and deductions claimed by the church. Many of these details are also listed in the transcribed cross-examination of the Catholic Church's accountant, also obtained by CBC News.

  • $2.7 million was paid to lawyers for legal work and unapproved "representation" unrelated to the compensation agreement. Two of the law firms receiving a total of 80 per cent of this money also had lawyers on the board of the national Catholic corporation that approved the expenses. One of those lawyers billed for legal and consulting expenses for attending the same events.
  • $2.3 million was spent on administration costs. Although no other Christian churches claimed administration expenses, the Catholic agreement allowed for the federal government to reimburse "reasonable" claims. The government agreed to pay $1 million of this amount.
  • $1.6 million was claimed for donations made outside the approval process to projects with a "First Nations" component. No explanation or invoices are supplied as evidence.
  • The church deducted more than $8 million for amounts paid to survivors before the 2005 settlement agreement was reached. This appears permissible in the agreement, but it has not been mentioned publicly by church officials when asked about the $29 million.
  • The Catholic Church did not file annual financial statements to the government as required until 2012, five years into the agreement.
  • The Catholic Church accountant testifies that $25 million worth of services were provided, "even though he has not audited these records and accounts, has no basis on which to value these services, and relies only on minutes of meetings" supplied by Catholic officials.
  • The church accountant testified that many of the donations had a "string attached," telling him where to put the money, contrary to the agreement. "Somebody will pay $50,000 and say, well, $40,000 of this has to be distributed back to this project," the accountant testified. 
  • $1.8 million was loaned from the $29-million cash account to the Catholic Church's fundraising arm and the private company contracted. Roughly $1.3 million of that was never repaid. The church had agreed the funds should remain separate and did not obtain federal government approval to take this action.

The factum concludes with a set of requests by the federal government's lawyers. It asks the judge to issue the following orders to the Catholic Church officials:

  • No more expenses can be accumulated or diverted without prior consent of the government.
  • Recover all payments made to law firms whose lawyers sat on the board approving the payments.
  • Explain to the court within 10 days what constituted the unspecified $2.7 million in "legal services."
  • Direct an investigator to review all administration costs.
  • Declare that the Catholic Church is in default of its obligations.

Judge ruled federal opposition to deal wasn't clear enough

The hearing was supposed to begin shortly after the factum was submitted. The Catholic Church's lawyer, Gordon J. Kuski, asked for an adjournment, and Gabrielson granted it for one month.

Kuski approached federal lawyer Alexander Gay with a settlement offer. When it became clear the churches were offering only $1.2 million more, Gay used phrases in emails such as, "We may have a problem" and "We have no agreement on the terms of the settlement."

After months of correspondence, there was still no written or verbal agreement. Kuski said this didn't matter, and when the case returned to court, he asked Gabrielson to declare a deal had been reached.

Gabrielson sided with the Catholic Church, saying Gay wasn't clear enough in his opposition to the proposal, and a "reasonable person" would conclude that a deal had been struck. The hearing was cancelled.

Catholic officials paid the $1.2 million and dissolved the corporation formed to oversee the settlement agreement.

Court officials decline to release file

This month, CBC News requested the 2015 file from Regina court officials. They declined, saying a formal application and hearing is necessary.

CBC News asked Court of Queen's Bench Chief Justice Martel Popescul to immediately produce the file. He also declined, saying proper procedure is being followed and that he can't interfere once another judge has become involved.

Legal experts interviewed disagree, saying the file is public and should be available immediately. Survivors say they have a right to see it. The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations, which represents Saskatchewan's First Nations, on Tuesday called for Popescul's resignation.

Amid calls for church boycotts and revelations the church devoted more than $300 million to cathedral and church construction during these same time periods, bishops across Canada have agreed to revive the fundraising campaign.

In recent weeks, CBC News has been asking Catholic officials from across Canada about the compensation deal. They admitted the fundraising campaign fell short of expectations, but several touted the $25 million worth of in-kind services, although none could provide a comprehensive list.

Others mentioned the $29-million cash payment, although none mentioned the millions apparently spent on administrators, lawyers or other expenses.

"$29 million — paid by Catholic dioceses and religious orders that operated residential schools — this was completed," an official with the Archdiocese of Toronto said in an email to CBC News earlier this month.

Bishop Mark Hagemoen of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon stated in an open letter last month there had been a "payment of $29 million in cash, which was directed to programs and services under the supervision of First Nations organizations and services."

UBC's Turpel-Lafond said while it's important for the truth to finally be exposed, these revelations feel like a "gut punch."

She said it shows the Catholic Church was not serious about its responsibilities to survivors.

"This was supposed to be sincere reconciliation, not another chance to run up expense claims and billable hours," she said.

 

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Wow, Catholics hire some really stupid priests:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/winnipeg-catholic-priest-accuses-residential-school-survivors-of-lying-about-abuse-for-money/ar-AAMGXaI?ocid=msedgntp

A Catholic priest has been banned by a Winnipeg archdiocese from speaking publicly after accusing residential school survivors of lying about sexual abuse to get more money from court settlements, and after he joked about shooting those who wrote graffiti on churches, among other comments. 

The statements were made over weeks of services at St. Emile Roman Catholic Church, and were included in videos on its Facebook page.  

During a July 10 mass Father Rhéal Forest — who was temporarily placed at St. Emile while the parish's regular pastor, Father Gerry Sembrano, was on vacation — said residential school survivors lied about being sexually abused so they would receive more money during the settlement process with the federal government.

"If they wanted extra money, from the money that was given to them, they had to lie sometimes — lie that they were abused sexually and, oop, another $50,000," Forest said.

"It's kind of hard if you're poor not to lie," he continued, adding that all of the Indigenous people he knew during his 22 years working up north liked residential schools. 

Forest acknowledged that a few had bad treatment, but said some of that was due not to nuns and priests but rather night watchmen. 

In its 2015 report, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission said there have been "over 40 successful convictions of former residential school staff members who sexually or physically abused students." As of Jan. 31 of that year, it said 37,951 claims for injuries resulting from physical and sexual abuse at residential schools had been received.

Priest described wanting to shoot vandals

In another mass, Forest described passing by another local church that had been vandalized with the words "Save the children."

He said he'd like to scare off vandals with a shotgun blast and shoot them if they didn't run away.

"As I'm passing by, thoughts of anger. If I had a shotgun at night and I'd see them, I'd go, 'Boom!' just to scare them and if they don't run away, I'll shoot them," Forest said in the July 18 sermon, laughing.

He then quickly backtracked, saying: "But this would not help, it's bad to do that, I'd go have a chat with them." He went on to blame the media for making the vandals believe the Catholic Church killed residential school children.

CBC News has requested an interview with Forest. The Archdiocese of St. Boniface says it is considering the request.  

Archdiocese removes videos

The archdiocese was made aware of the comments on Monday, after CBC Manitoba flagged the videos. St. Emile regularly livestreams its services. 

Daniel Bahuaud, a spokesperson for the archdiocese and Archbishop Albert LeGatt, said the videos involving Forest have since been removed and apologized for the comments. The archdiocese has also barred Forest from preaching and teaching publicly.

LeGatt and the archdiocese "completely disavow" Forest's comments, Bahuaud said in an email.   

"We very much regret the pain they may have caused to many people, not least of course Indigenous people and, more specifically, survivors of the Residential School system." 

In an interview Bahuaud said any further punishment for Forest would be decided by LeGatt. 

'Disgusting views'

Kyle Mason — an Indigenous leader, activist and former Christian minister — said he was surprised "anybody within [the Catholic Church] can be so out of touch and so outdated, and have these really disgusting views going on within themselves."

Mason went on to say if the church "is really concerned about reconciliation here in Canada, they would be enthusiastically trying to make sure that all their priests and all their staff are well aware and that there would be no room for these kinds of comments."

Mason said he is glad to hear Forest is not allowed to preach publicly anymore, or take part in church educational activities. He said he would like to see Forest learn more about what really happened at residential schools before he is allowed to resume his public duties. 

"I would strongly encourage [the church] to use this as a teaching moment for them to make sure that anybody — priests, nuns, staff, whatever it is, whatever their leaders are within their ranks — are well-informed on residential schools, Sixties Scoop and all the other ways that we are seeing the impact of these atrocities within our society," he said. 

When asked what impact Forest's words would have on reconciliation, Mason was hopeful. 

"In my opinion, reconciliation can't be stopped. It can be slow sometimes, but it cannot be stopped." 

Do you have information about unmarked graves, children who never came home or residential school staff and operations? Email your tips to CBC's new Indigenous-led team investigating residential schools: WhereAreThey@cbc.ca.

 

 

 

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7 minutes ago, gurn said:

Wow, Catholics hire some really stupid priests:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/winnipeg-catholic-priest-accuses-residential-school-survivors-of-lying-about-abuse-for-money/ar-AAMGXaI?ocid=msedgntp

A Catholic priest has been banned by a Winnipeg archdiocese from speaking publicly after accusing residential school survivors of lying about sexual abuse to get more money from court settlements, and after he joked about shooting those who wrote graffiti on churches, among other comments. 

The statements were made over weeks of services at St. Emile Roman Catholic Church, and were included in videos on its Facebook page.  

During a July 10 mass Father Rhéal Forest — who was temporarily placed at St. Emile while the parish's regular pastor, Father Gerry Sembrano, was on vacation — said residential school survivors lied about being sexually abused so they would receive more money during the settlement process with the federal government.

"If they wanted extra money, from the money that was given to them, they had to lie sometimes — lie that they were abused sexually and, oop, another $50,000," Forest said.

"It's kind of hard if you're poor not to lie," he continued, adding that all of the Indigenous people he knew during his 22 years working up north liked residential schools. 

Forest acknowledged that a few had bad treatment, but said some of that was due not to nuns and priests but rather night watchmen. 

In its 2015 report, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission said there have been "over 40 successful convictions of former residential school staff members who sexually or physically abused students." As of Jan. 31 of that year, it said 37,951 claims for injuries resulting from physical and sexual abuse at residential schools had been received.

Priest described wanting to shoot vandals

In another mass, Forest described passing by another local church that had been vandalized with the words "Save the children."

He said he'd like to scare off vandals with a shotgun blast and shoot them if they didn't run away.

"As I'm passing by, thoughts of anger. If I had a shotgun at night and I'd see them, I'd go, 'Boom!' just to scare them and if they don't run away, I'll shoot them," Forest said in the July 18 sermon, laughing.

He then quickly backtracked, saying: "But this would not help, it's bad to do that, I'd go have a chat with them." He went on to blame the media for making the vandals believe the Catholic Church killed residential school children.

CBC News has requested an interview with Forest. The Archdiocese of St. Boniface says it is considering the request.  

Archdiocese removes videos

The archdiocese was made aware of the comments on Monday, after CBC Manitoba flagged the videos. St. Emile regularly livestreams its services. 

Daniel Bahuaud, a spokesperson for the archdiocese and Archbishop Albert LeGatt, said the videos involving Forest have since been removed and apologized for the comments. The archdiocese has also barred Forest from preaching and teaching publicly.

LeGatt and the archdiocese "completely disavow" Forest's comments, Bahuaud said in an email.   

"We very much regret the pain they may have caused to many people, not least of course Indigenous people and, more specifically, survivors of the Residential School system." 

In an interview Bahuaud said any further punishment for Forest would be decided by LeGatt. 

'Disgusting views'

Kyle Mason — an Indigenous leader, activist and former Christian minister — said he was surprised "anybody within [the Catholic Church] can be so out of touch and so outdated, and have these really disgusting views going on within themselves."

Mason went on to say if the church "is really concerned about reconciliation here in Canada, they would be enthusiastically trying to make sure that all their priests and all their staff are well aware and that there would be no room for these kinds of comments."

Mason said he is glad to hear Forest is not allowed to preach publicly anymore, or take part in church educational activities. He said he would like to see Forest learn more about what really happened at residential schools before he is allowed to resume his public duties. 

"I would strongly encourage [the church] to use this as a teaching moment for them to make sure that anybody — priests, nuns, staff, whatever it is, whatever their leaders are within their ranks — are well-informed on residential schools, Sixties Scoop and all the other ways that we are seeing the impact of these atrocities within our society," he said. 

When asked what impact Forest's words would have on reconciliation, Mason was hopeful. 

"In my opinion, reconciliation can't be stopped. It can be slow sometimes, but it cannot be stopped." 

Do you have information about unmarked graves, children who never came home or residential school staff and operations? Email your tips to CBC's new Indigenous-led team investigating residential schools: WhereAreThey@cbc.ca.

 

 

 

Scary that an asshat like this guy has the position of a priest.  

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4 minutes ago, Alflives said:

Scary that an asshat like this guy has the position of a priest.  

Kind of makes me wonder :

what else has he said

has he done anything, that he would just laugh off, while others would be disgusted?

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If anything, this pushes me further into the tax the hell out of churches camp.  There are plenty of non-religious groups who would gladly take your donations or volunteering.  Force the churches to justify every God damn dollar.  

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1 hour ago, thedestroyerofworlds said:

If anything, this pushes me further into the tax the hell out of churches camp.  There are plenty of non-religious groups who would gladly take your donations or volunteering.  Force the churches to justify every God damn dollar.  

 

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On 7/14/2021 at 6:01 PM, RUPERTKBD said:

I assume this is a younger person who is the child of a complete moron. The problem in Canada is we have a society of tolerant and understanding people, under a certain age because of our multi ethnic population, but in rural areas not every young person is properly educated in history and wont meet a minority, so their parents bitching about whatever problem group rubs off on them and they act out in ways their parents wouldn't, because even dumb racist adults in Canada know to keep quiet and discreet about it.

 

Similarly when I see people under a certain age supporting the Queen as a figurehead, I start talking about the history of the UK and their treatment of the natives and if that's not enough, partition and colonization and they tell me they didn't know it was that bad and change their tune. Eventually we'll get rid of that stupid old crone, hopefully before she croaks for the optics.

 

Just don't take stuff like this seriously, Canada has been going in the right direction in general in the last few years, Harper could still be here in a different universe and who knows how HE would have treated COVID or Trump.

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Some progress seems to be being made on the drinking water problem:

 

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-ottawa-first-nations-reach-settlement-in-class-action-suit-over-water/?utm_medium=email&utm_source=Breaking News&utm_content=2021-7-30_15&utm_term=Ottawa, First Nations reach settlement in class-action suit over water quality&utm_campaign=newsletter&cu_id=t7%2BP3rI%2Bt%2FYx5Iui%2B6yRZxVYYZ6TE%2BGK

 

Federal government settles with multiple First Nations over safe drinking water lawsuits
 

Ottawa is committing nearly $8-billion to settle two class-action lawsuits from First Nations over unsafe drinking water and to fix water-quality problems on dozens of reserve communities across the country.

 

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller announced the agreement in principle on Friday along with the leaders of three plaintiff communities – Curve Lake First Nation, Neskantaga First Nation and Tataskweyak Cree Nation – who expressed cautious optimism for the deal’s potential to end decades of health and social issues on reserves.

 

“For hundreds of years now, Canada has enjoyed vast wealth while Indigenous people lack access to even the basic necessities of life like drinkable water,” said Curve Lake First Nation Chief Emily Whetung. “Today, we have come one step closer to reconciling this long history.

 

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On 7/30/2021 at 3:30 PM, UnkNuk said:

Some progress seems to be being made on the drinking water problem:

 

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-ottawa-first-nations-reach-settlement-in-class-action-suit-over-water/?utm_medium=email&utm_source=Breaking News&utm_content=2021-7-30_15&utm_term=Ottawa, First Nations reach settlement in class-action suit over water quality&utm_campaign=newsletter&cu_id=t7%2BP3rI%2Bt%2FYx5Iui%2B6yRZxVYYZ6TE%2BGK

 

Federal government settles with multiple First Nations over safe drinking water lawsuits
 

Ottawa is committing nearly $8-billion to settle two class-action lawsuits from First Nations over unsafe drinking water and to fix water-quality problems on dozens of reserve communities across the country.

 

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller announced the agreement in principle on Friday along with the leaders of three plaintiff communities – Curve Lake First Nation, Neskantaga First Nation and Tataskweyak Cree Nation – who expressed cautious optimism for the deal’s potential to end decades of health and social issues on reserves.

 

“For hundreds of years now, Canada has enjoyed vast wealth while Indigenous people lack access to even the basic necessities of life like drinkable water,” said Curve Lake First Nation Chief Emily Whetung. “Today, we have come one step closer to reconciling this long history.

 

It's kinda &^@#ed the technology is there to provide them with safe drinking water.you can go on Alibaba and buy water plants for dirt cheap.Im gonna start building my own mobile water treatment plants next year.

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On 7/3/2021 at 8:55 AM, gurn said:

 

 

Sadly as I said in this thread 

Horrible news. 

I've spent time in Alert Bay, they had a residential school there for years. The brick building is now being used for other purposes, but the memories remain.

 

 

 

 

Now, is this the final catalyst that gets actual change going?

Do we the people rise up and not just demand change, but begin changing things?

The last decade or so, has seen a lot of organizations/businesses/governments do a lot of talking about the problems we have.

How many of them have actually done something?

The last decade or so, has seen "we" the people doing a lot of talking about the problems we have.

How many of us have actually done something?

 

Turned on the Blue Jay's game last week, MLB had all the teams wearing camouflage baseball caps to show support for the troops and veterans.

How many veterans are currently working for MLB? 

Canucks- orange out the exterior  of their building today; and for years have announced how they are privileged to play on the  "unceded" land of the local native groups.

How many indigenous employees do they have?

 

I'm in no way implying that giving jobs to people will make everything better; just trying to point out that society does an awful lot of symbolism, I'd like to see us actually doing something.

 

 

I wonder if this thread gets to 30 pages, or does it fade away?

A year from now what will be different?

Anything?

Will we be different? Will we even try to be ...............?"

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

NOTE- the thread this was originally posted made it to 3 pages.-

THere have been a few pages of talk about this in the "Lberals Form Minority" thread and now 5 pages in this thread.

 

The challenge remains, what are we going to actually do about this?

 

On 7/3/2021 at 8:59 AM, Jimmy McGill said:

one could argue that if you do nothing, you don't really care that much. 

 

On 7/3/2021 at 9:06 AM, gurn said:

 

Unfortunately, imo, this will all get pushed back by more "current news" and other than platitudes from government and church and us "the people" I think not much will change.

 

On 7/3/2021 at 9:17 AM, gurn said:

Full disclosure I have not yet called my local MLA or MP, on this issue, to demand change or criminal charges where applicable. 

 

Who has?

 

I committ to doing so on Monday July 5th.

 

On 7/5/2021 at 5:22 PM, gurn said:

So today was a great  day.

Shopping with Mom.

Powell River Rec center opened up for drop in swims, so I went.

Then the bank

then shopping for me

came home did dishes

Then onto the 3 websites I visit

Re-arranged my e mails to bring forward my retirement letters- gotta apply tommorrow.

Now a hockey game.

 

 

I only mention all this because on Saturday, in this thread, I said this :

"

Full disclosure I have not yet called my local MLA or MP, on this issue, to demand change or criminal charges where applicable. 

 

Who has?

 

I committ to doing so on Monday July 5th."

 

 

So much for my committement. :(

And it is just that easy for somethings to never get dealt with.

I will try again tommorrow, putting  it on my literal list right after I press Reply.

 

On 7/6/2021 at 12:13 PM, gurn said:

Drove past the local NDP rding offices today, feds and provincial share an office, could not find parking so came home and sent of an e mail to each level,

 

To  federal MP, Rachel Blaney:

"Hi:

   Just a note to say I will be voting for which ever party will do the best job of  solving the issues surrounding land rights and fresh drinkable water for our Indigenous peoples.

I saw a few minutes of the Party Leader on the news and liked what I saw.

However- NO more platitudes, or symbolism. Orange shirts are nice to wear, but action speaks with better results than frilly words.

Lets get things done."

 

And to provincial MLA Nicholas Simons; a fellow I have had many conversations with, and find to be a reasonable man.

"

Hi:

   Just a note to say I will be voting for which ever party will do the best job of  solving the issues surrounding land rights and fresh drinkable water for our Indigenous peoples. I recognize this is mostly federal jurisdiction, but the province has role to play as well.

I saw a few minutes of the Federal Party Leader on the news and liked what I saw.

However- NO more platitudes, or symbolism. Orange shirts are nice to wear, but action speaks with better results than frilly words, or coloured shirts.

Lets get things done.

 

 

So, it has been a month and a day since this thread was started.

I'd wondered if the thread would make it to 30 pages, and so far it is on 13.

 

One thing I want to know, did anyone, other than me, send off an e mail expressing the dire need to fix these issues?

I'm not claiming an e mail to be a great effort, just wondering if anyone else went that far.?

Anyone else go farther, like sit down with a tribal elder and have a talk about this?

My chat was no huge time consumer, and I know nothing was solved or fixed by that conversation, but I learned a bit, and I hope I can continue to learn, as well as share a bit.

 I was already aware of the blatant racism, and even veiled racism, but now better understand just how subtle it can be.

 Little things, that when added up become huge things.

 Why does the grocery store call a cashier to the front when 5 non indigenous folk are waiting to pay, yet allow the line up to get to 7 or 8 when it is Tla'amin residents waiting.?---- I kid you not.

 Yet, at another store, full marks to Costco in Comox, as I waited in a line the fellow beside me started yapping about how he didn't want "those" people touching his purchases; I went and had a chat with a manager who made sure that fellow had to go through that till. As he left, with his stuff I asked him if he was going to throw  it all that out as it had been touched by 'those' people. Almost a fist fight, I think me starting with "Hey racist, are you  going to..." might have ha something to do with it.:unsure:

 

 I encourage everybody, when waiting in lines, just watch to see if people do get treated differently, and if so, how much more often than you had previously thought?

I encourage everyone to actually do something, more than just come on here. It is ok to come on here, and other sites, to discuss issues; but we all need to do more than just talk about it.

 

 

 

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42 minutes ago, gurn said:

 

 

 

 

 

So, it has been a month and a day since this thread was started.

I'd wondered if the thread would make it to 30 pages, and so far it is on 13.

 

One thing I want to know, did anyone, other than me, send off an e mail expressing the dire need to fix these issues?

I'm not claiming an e mail to be a great effort, just wondering if anyone else went that far.?

Anyone else go farther, like sit down with a tribal elder and have a talk about this?

My chat was no huge time consumer, and I know nothing was solved or fixed by that conversation, but I learned a bit, and I hope I can continue to learn, as well as share a bit.

 I was already aware of the blatant racism, and even veiled racism, but now better understand just how subtle it can be.

 Little things, that when added up become huge things.

 Why does the grocery store call a cashier to the front when 5 non indigenous folk are waiting to pay, yet allow the line up to get to 7 or 8 when it is Tla'amin residents waiting.?---- I kid you not.

 Yet, at another store, full marks to Costco in Comox, as I waited in a line the fellow beside me started yapping about how he didn't want "those" people touching his purchases; I went and had a chat with a manager who made sure that fellow had to go through that till. As he left, with his stuff I asked him if he was going to throw  it all that out as it had been touched by 'those' people. Almost a fist fight, I think me starting with "Hey racist, are you  going to..." might have ha something to do with it.:unsure:

 

 I encourage everybody, when waiting in lines, just watch to see if people do get treated differently, and if so, how much more often than you had previously thought?

I encourage everyone to actually do something, more than just come on here. It is ok to come on here, and other sites, to discuss issues; but we all need to do more than just talk about it.

 

 

 

I've been thinking about developing a free educational resource, just not quite sure how to approach it yet. Its not directly related to residential schools, the idea is around highlighting first nations technologies, something that can be used in the K-12 system to highlight the kinds of really cool design went in to things like kayaks, igloos, pottery, etc. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
On 8/3/2021 at 3:41 PM, gurn said:

 

 

 

 

 

So, it has been a month and a day since this thread was started.

I'd wondered if the thread would make it to 30 pages, and so far it is on 13.

 

One thing I want to know, did anyone, other than me, send off an e mail expressing the dire need to fix these issues?

I'm not claiming an e mail to be a great effort, just wondering if anyone else went that far.?

Anyone else go farther, like sit down with a tribal elder and have a talk about this?

My chat was no huge time consumer, and I know nothing was solved or fixed by that conversation, but I learned a bit, and I hope I can continue to learn, as well as share a bit.

 I was already aware of the blatant racism, and even veiled racism, but now better understand just how subtle it can be.

 Little things, that when added up become huge things.

 Why does the grocery store call a cashier to the front when 5 non indigenous folk are waiting to pay, yet allow the line up to get to 7 or 8 when it is Tla'amin residents waiting.?---- I kid you not.

 Yet, at another store, full marks to Costco in Comox, as I waited in a line the fellow beside me started yapping about how he didn't want "those" people touching his purchases; I went and had a chat with a manager who made sure that fellow had to go through that till. As he left, with his stuff I asked him if he was going to throw  it all that out as it had been touched by 'those' people. Almost a fist fight, I think me starting with "Hey racist, are you  going to..." might have ha something to do with it.:unsure:

 

 I encourage everybody, when waiting in lines, just watch to see if people do get treated differently, and if so, how much more often than you had previously thought?

I encourage everyone to actually do something, more than just come on here. It is ok to come on here, and other sites, to discuss issues; but we all need to do more than just talk about it.

 

 

 

Haven't sent an email asking for reform myself. Didn't seem like my style. With my deslexia it takes me a long time to write my thoughts out properly. It's one of the main reasons I love this place so much, I can practice in a more relaxed environment.

 

Personally I took a hard look at what I could do to help in the community. I joined the First Nation Committee in my career field to help start bringing attention to barriers keeping Indigenous people from seeking healthcare. Also in the process of implementing a Orange Shirt day Initiative at the clinic for September 30th. Still need to figure out the legistics but so far it's moving in a positive direction.

Edited by shayster007
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Posted (edited)
On 8/3/2021 at 4:26 PM, Jimmy McGill said:

I've been thinking about developing a free educational resource, just not quite sure how to approach it yet. Its not directly related to residential schools, the idea is around highlighting first nations technologies, something that can be used in the K-12 system to highlight the kinds of really cool design went in to things like kayaks, igloos, pottery, etc. 

 

 

If you haven't checked this out it's a awesome resources. They do a ton of great things in this course and would be a great starting point in trying to figure out where to start.

 

https://www.ualberta.ca/admissions-programs/online-courses/indigenous-canada/index.html

 

 

Unlike the UoA course this one is not free, but has a ton of awesome content. It's something some healthcare governing boards are starting to concider making a mandatory part of continue education.

 

https://www.sanyas.ca/

 

 

Edited by shayster007
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